Ford 6.9, or 7.3 bellhousing bolt pattern dimensions
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Thread: Ford 6.9, or 7.3 bellhousing bolt pattern dimensions

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    Default Ford 6.9, or 7.3 bellhousing bolt pattern dimensions

    Hello to all
    I'm in the process of making a 6bt adapt to a zf 5 speed and would like to know if anyone can point me in the direction of a drawing showing the dimensions of the bolt pattern on the rear of the ford diesel. The pattern used in the beginning of the 6.9 idi to the 7.3 power stroke used up into the early 2000-2001 models or when ever they stopped putting in the 7.3 and went with the 6.0. I understand that I can buy one of these at destroked and will if necessary. I just thought I would give this a shot since I have the metalworking tools to do the job. I also need to do this to two vehicles and it would be worth while if I can get the plans together.

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    The bare minimum machines to make an adapter plate like this are also used to get the dimensions off the parts you're copying.

    Dowel pin and starter location is critical.

    If you actually need 2 of them give me a call. I make the 5.9 Cummins to 7.3 pattern plates that use the 6.0 PSD starter (no bellhousing cutting). If you were in a position to buy two adapter plates I can do two for a deal that would probably make you reconsider even thinking of doing them yourself.

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    I have been able to measure all of the locations for the adapter using the milling machine and center guage. I'm close to making a plan but I'm looking for a way to measure the crankshaft position in regards to the dowel alignment pins

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    The crank center relationship is easiest to measure from a bare ZF transmission case or old 6.9 T19 bellhousing.
    There are other ways to do it if you don't have those things, basically you will need to attach the IH adapter to a block and then fix the crankshaft location on the adapter using another part (made by you) that fits the crank flange and bolts to the adapter plate. Or pay a metrology company to give you point data for the parts using their CMM.

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    The 6.9 and 7.3 are International engines. There was an adaptor used to mate them to the Ford transmissions used in Ford applications. Find one of these at a junkyard.
    True self-esteem comes only from what your dog thinks of you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 69rambler View Post
    The crank center relationship is easiest to measure from a bare ZF transmission case or old 6.9 T19 bellhousing.
    There are other ways to do it if you don't have those things, basically you will need to attach the IH adapter to a block and then fix the crankshaft location on the adapter using another part (made by you) that fits the crank flange and bolts to the adapter plate. Or pay a metrology company to give you point data for the parts using their CMM.
    Clever indeed!
    I had not thought of that one. So, I should turn a piece to fit over the crank then bolt it to the adapter. Once mounted to the adapter I can measure it on the mill.
    Thanks for the good idea 69rambler

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    Machinist is an improvised trade, you can do a lot with a little if you have the mindset for it.

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