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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Bored this morning so I decided I'd start my build thread-I'm wanting to make it a pretty pic-heavy thread because that's what I like to see...
My first project was a 1967 Caprice 4-door (got a family so with road trips a 4-door is a must) that I was going to drop a B3.3T into...


Well, I got into the project car and there was a lot of cancer in the C-pillar-too much for me to be able to fix. Somebody years ago had seen the rust, put fiberglass on the outside and inside of the rusted metal, and just put the vinyl back on the roof to call it good...it felt solid but once I got the vinyl off it was all eaten up.

I waited a couple of years for the body shop (a hot rod shop that could actually re-create the metal) to get around to my car and it never happened. We moved and at the new house we're not allowed to have a non-running car parked outside for more than 30 days, and the garage was still full of boxes from the move, so I sold the Caprice (but was unable to sell the engine).
The next Christmas, my wife asked me what I wanted for a present and I told her garage space for a project car. She said okay and I started looking. I've always liked the looks of the stepdown Hudsons...there's something about them that I really like. I looked for months and finally found one that was only about 3 hours away and got it...This is the Hudson as I got it home


 

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Discussion Starter #2
I spent the first year with disassembly, marking everything for inventory, a lot (more) research, and making decisions on what I wanted to do...I still have the Cummins, but I found an old air-cooled Deutz with an automotive IP for a decent price, it runs well, so I bought it to use instead of the Cummins.



 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks to school, then a back injury, then surgery/recovery, then all this COVID stuff (I'm a paramedic so I COULD still work-IF I hadn't messed up my back-again), and then getting caught back up with everything else just before Christmas, I've spent a lot more time having to do more research on the Deutz, seeing if the Deutz would even FIT in the Hudson (it does, but it's tight-pics below), then re-planning everything else mechanical about the build (seeing what parts I could still use, what I would need to do different, how things would need to be done differently), getting more parts, and cleaning/painting...I'm still not completely done, but getting a lot closer. Just got through ordering adapters to mate the Deutz to the transmission and to get this massive powerplant/transmission mounted. Waiting on those now...


 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
The car is a 1952 Hudson Pacemaker sedan...from the firewall back it's basically a Hornet, the difference is 4 inches less car forward of the firewall and 4 inches less bumper in the front/rear. I'm using a Deutz F5L912 from a 1981 Iveco Flatbed, a T56 from a '94 F-body (.74 and .5 OD ratios), and the front/rear suspension from a Jaguar XJ6.

The Deutz fits, but barely...BUT weight-wise, even the little Cummins was pushing it for the stock suspension. I decided on using the suspension (front and rear) from a Jaguar XJ6 series 3 because it could handle the 800 extra pounds of engine/transmission I'm adding in the front and it has IRS in the rear, which I was going to have to modify anyway (and in the course of research found out it will fit with relative ease into the rear of a Hudson stepdown) I found them on the book of faces, bought them, and commenced to tearing them apart (both to rebuild and to make em a bit prettier). The differential is out for rebuild and has taken a lot longer than I expected, but it wasn't something I was willing/able to tackle...I can tear stuff apart a lot better than I can get it together...




 

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Discussion Starter #5
As always, the build isn't going to progress very quickly...Life always seems to somehow get in the way, be it a broken foot (2019), a broken back (2020), not having enough of either time or money (when I have one I don't have the other, lol). I'll be posting as I get stuff done so it will likely be weeks between "look at what I've done" update posts...I'm hoping that finally posting a build thread will provide a kick in the ass for me to get stuff done more quickly than I have been so far...
Merry Crisis and a Happy new fear!
 

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I love the build!
I have been toying with the idea of swapping a diesel into my great grand fathers 1940 Buick Limited.
I have used the Jaguar XJ suspension and love it!
I am excited to follow along
 

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Great project. One thing about the Deutz you don't need a radiator. If you live in an area where you might need heat you can either do a small diesel powered heater which is kind of pricey for the good ones or plumb an oil cooler into the cab and use it for heat when needed.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'm still not completely sure which way I'm gonna end up going for heating the cabin...A diesel fired heater provides nearly instant heat but the cheapest I've seen are running at least $400 with most being in the 6-700 range and I'd like to save my change for other parts. I think I'm probably gonna end up just running engine oil through the heater core-I'm probably going to use a VintageAir system (I'm in the Tulsa area so a heater and A/C is gonna be a must); I'm guessing I can do that but haven't read into it very much. I learned that the Iveco trucks had the A/C compressor mounted to the frame in front of the engine...I might end up doing the same unless I have space available to build a bracket for the compressor.
I've been worried about driveline/suspension/brakes so far so I haven't really looked much past that except when I got bored and ran out of work to do (usually either out of money or the weather's not good enough to spend time in the garage).
I've learned that when I try to think everything through and plan out everything ahead of time, I end up feeling overwhelmed, the whole thing ends up stalling out for a bit, and I end up having wasted a lot of time because I end up changing one thing and everything else changes. If I just focus on the next step or two I end up on top of things a lot better and end up getting stuff done. Case in point: I was originally going to use the Cummins B3.3T until I found the Deutz...Once I bought the Deutz I had to go re-figuring things out.
Right now, I'm waiting on the Salisbury differential (basically a Dana44) to get done so I can put the IRS cradle back together. Once I get the cradle re-assembled I can get the brackets on the car, get the cradle mounted, and then I can see what size wheels I'll use. I don't want to have to carry different sized wheels so I'm going to have to get the suspensions on (front and rear) then see what size wheels fit. I want to be able to change a rear tire without dropping the whole cradle and make sure the fronts don't rub when turning. If I have to, I might end up running different size wheels/tires front to rear and just use a small spare. I might end up having to shorten the half-shafts, but I'm really not wanting to do that...I had some ideas on how to do that, but I'm not really sure how well anything like that would hold up in the long-run...
My ideas:

 

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Discussion Starter #10
With the added weight of the Deutz and the T56, the front of the car is going to probably be 700+ lbs heavier than it originally was so the Hudson suspension wasn't going to cut it. The Jag front suspension will handle the extra weight and has the benefit of having 4 piston disc brakes and power steering. But I still have to supply pressure to power steering and vacuum to the brakes. I bought an Isuzu alternator with a vacuum pump to use with the Cummins, so I was thinking I would just make a bracket to fit it to the Deutz and the Deutz had a power steering pump already in place...or so I thought. When I removed it to rebuild and paint it, it wasn't a steering pump, it was a gear driven vacuum pump. My Deutz guy Clarke informed me that Deutz did make a gear-driven power steering pump that fit in the same place on the engine. He looked around a bit, made some calls, and found one that he's sending me. So now I'll have pressurized fluid for power steering and a Hydroboost... which will be the next step in the process after the suspension is mounted.

Which leads me to the question of what is the "correct" order of operations for a project like this? This is my first major car project...all my other projects have always just been fixing or improving something that's already in place. In the GTO (2006) is was replacing the suspension parts, a tune, upgrading the clutch, replacing the driveshaft with a one-piece, adding a hidden trailer hitch, and cosmetic stuff. In the Mercedes Bluetec it was another hidden hitch, a tune, fixing the exhaust (gutting it and adding a spare tire where it should have been instead of the exhaust aftertreatments taking up the space), more cosmetic stuff. In the Jetta (still under the VW emissions coverage so it's not tuned/deleted-yet) it's been a navigation system/back-up camera and a lot of sound proofing. This is the only car I've ever "built" so I'm kinda lost as to what the order of operations should be...what I am thinking is;
1. Suspension-getting front/rear mounted
2. Wheels-getting the correct size/offset
3. Brakes-getting the Hydroboost/pedal installed, lines in place, and the parking brake in working order
4. Getting the engine/trans mounted and the driveshaft made/installed
5. Steering components-column, plumb power steering, wheel installed
6. Clutch, pedal, and lines- setting it up and getting it functional
7. Fuel tank/truck pan/hidden trailer hitch (all between the rear frame rails...not one piece, but all together)
8. Fuel lines in place
9. Wiring harness
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
... WOW THAT OLD DUETZ SHOULD push that old boat around the block.
I'm hoping, anyway...the Deutz originally powered an Iveco 16ft flatbed with a GVWR of 22,000 lbs, it won't be a racecar...but it won't be a slug in a sedan that only weighs 4k lbs.
.I think the Cummins will be able to make more hp (with mods), but the Deutz (still naturally aspirated, for now) has a little over 200 ft/lbs available at idle with a peak torque of 220 ft/lbs @1450 rpm. It has a pretty flat torque curve through about 2400...hp is rated at 99/2800rpm.

Clarke told me that it'll take a turbo and with an intercooler, the power can be reliably increased by about 50%...the biggest plus for me was the overall simplicity and reliability of the Deutz-there are engines that have been run under full load at 2400 rpm for tens of thousands of hours without being cracked open. The Germans made this thing to be uber-reliable...they also engineered it to be able to be overhauled in the field with hand tools...I can replace an entire cylinder (head, cylinder/liner, piston/connecting rod) in frame with hand tools. There's also the sound...not quite as aurally pleasing as the Detroit 53 series, but I like the sound of the air-cooled Deutz-it sounds like a tractor at idle, like a semi mid-range, and it thunders like a B29 at higher RPM...
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Well, I got the last of my adapters in on the 30th but I woke up feeling bad with a fever so I called into work. Had to go get tested for Covid and Flu A/B-Diagnosed with Covid. Felt kinda bad and really tired the last couple of weeks so I didn't have a chance to do a lot. Today was the first day I felt alright so I got out for an hour and a half or so and got the adapters mounted and torqued down. I still need a few bolts to get the trans secured, but I'm a little bit further than yesterday, which is what matters, I guess ...I'll get out and find the bolts tomorrow so I can get the trans mounted then I can finally see how the engine/trans looks when they're together!


 

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Discussion Starter #14
slight price difference...I'm still mulling over how I want to do it...I like the idea of nearly instant heat, but I'm leaning more towards a traditional heater core so I have an easy heater/AC system, I'm planning on daily driving this thing so an AC here is a must (Tulsa area), I'm just not sure if I can use engine oil through a heater core...not really sure why I couldn't, but haven't read up on it much yet.
When I got the engine, it was on a crate. I ran the engine number and was able to find out it was from an Iveco flatbed and had a Fiat trans with it. It had a vacuum pump on it that vented into the front casing (drains into the oil pan)-I'm not sure what it went to originally, but I'm wondering if I can use the vacuum pump to pull engine oil through the heater core. I tore the seal on the front while disassembling it-I can replace it based on size, but otherwise it looks like it's in really good condition-the plastic vanes are nice and smooth, they move freely in their slots, the plastic is all intact. Would it damage a heater core to have oil pulled through it?
 
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