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I am not sure that flywheel fits the spice 3053a there’s a thread here that tells you what that fella got to work but a 1000$ yikes!
If a grand scares ya, you are probably involved in the wrong hobby ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #42
I wondered around FB n the net looking at 292ci Chevy in-line 6s and Ford 300 6s. I am definitely a huge fan of inline motors. It just sucks that slant 6 is too under powered for a 1 ton. The 6ers are cheap n easy to upgrade and work on. I just don’t care for V8s. The Spicer can be hooked up to the 292 according to the artical by 4wheel magazine I think Sbc and a 3053a swap in an m715. I think I may have a lead on that bell housing and flywheel setup not sure yet. But man I would make some guys mad putting a ford or Chevy motor in a Dodge. As for me I just love old 4x4s so I’m more Brand neutral LMAO.
 

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I wondered around FB n the net looking at 292ci Chevy in-line 6s and Ford 300 6s. I am definitely a huge fan of inline motors. It just sucks that slant 6 is too under powered for a 1 ton. The 6ers are cheap n easy to upgrade and work on. I just don’t care for V8s. The Spicer can be hooked up to the 292 according to the artical by 4wheel magazine I think Sbc and a 3053a swap in an m715. I think I may have a lead on that bell housing and flywheel setup not sure yet. But man I would make some guys mad putting a ford or Chevy motor in a Dodge. As for me I just love old 4x4s so I’m more Brand neutral LMAO.
I like V8's myself, but LS-type engines are so played nowandays that I probably wouldn't use one. I'd stick with a gen 1 SBC, or a Mark IV BBC, or even a Ford or Chrysler V8. Just depends on the project and application. As for inline 6's, the AMC/Jeep 4.0 is probably my favorite. Throw a 4.2 crank in a 4.0 NVH block and you got 4.6-4.7L worth of torque-making coolness. I rate the 292 Chevy and the 300 Ford basically the same, but being a Chevy guy I'd probably lean toward the 292. Again, it would depend on the project. I wouldn't throw a Chevy motor in a Ford vehicle when there are perfectly good Ford engines to do the job. The Chrysler slant six is my second favorite inline 6. The 170 is the best for performance due to the bore/stroke ratio and balanced breathing. The 198 is ok, but I'd take a 225 over the 198 if I need a bigger slant. The main problem with the 225 is that it is so undersquare and is stuck with 170-sized valves. It makes gobs of torque for it's displacement at low RPMs, but as you noted it ain't gonna be a powerhouse. It IS technically powerful enough for a 1-ton, as long as you ain't in a big hurry to get anywhere. It's just as well that the 225 slant 6 has the breathing limitations, because the long stroke combined with only 4 main bearings equals a crank too flexible and unsupported to handle large amounts of RPM. The big counterweights on the slant 6 crank make for a seriously huge hunk of iron, but thanks to the use of hemi-sized (the old, original hemis) main bearings it's plenty stout nontheless.



225's made prior to 1977 have forged steel cranks. The 77-later nodular cast iron cranks are very strong, and I wouldn't have any qualms about building a stout 225 using the cast cranks. If you ever build a 77-later slant, be advised that the cast cranks use narrower bearings vs the older forged crank.

If you have a forged crank engine, one old-school trick routinely done back in the day was to weld the throws and regrind the crank to a stroke to 4.500" (stock is 4.125"). Punch the bore to 3.485" and use suitable pistons. The result is 260 cubic inches, 4.3 liters! That creates a slant that can make similar or a bit more power than the 90's and 2000's GM 4.3L V6, and quite a bit more torque at a lower RPM, with the right cam, intake, and exhaust. Again, the heads and little valves seriously limit high RPM breathing, so it will be done by 4500RPM, but it will pull stumps up till that point!

I have around 30k$ in my Bobbed Deuce&1/2 That I’m selling I don’t think I’m scared to spend money I just want to spend my money wisely.
Sometimes you don't have a choice. I thought the 3053a used an SAE #3 or SAE #2 flywheel housing and flywheel? Unless you get a deal on used stuff I can see the flywheel housing, flywheel, and starter costing a grand, if not more. A Chinese (spit) starter would save a few hundred.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
Ya the flywheel that fits the SAE#3 that fits the Spicer is 1000$ to as high as 1400$ Just for the flywheel 13” clutch the SAE#2 You have to have a multifuel Aluminum adapter ring reworked to fit the Cummins engine 14”clutch. The effort and expense is worth it as the Spicer is way stronger than an Nv4500 and is a fraction of the price even rebuilt. Also plenty of USA made parts. Unlike the NV4500 and it’s special gear oil. It’s just the parts to mate it is where it’s more of a pay wall. In my research no other combos will work to mate a Spicer 3053a to a Cummins. I am glad to talk about and share my ideas and research with everyone as well as get different opinions on things. I would have done the Slant 6 route if I didn’t need it to go highway speeds but I need 60 or 70mph not screaming down the road. It kinda has me all over the place thinking and researching ideas for the swap.
 

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Discussion Starter #46
I also wanted to explain why the Poly 318 has to go it would have to be torn down to convert to unleaded gas and any upgrade parts are made of unobtainium and expensive. I’m just gonna pull it n sell it and the transmission when it comes time. The axles too if it comes down to it.
 

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17.5 wheels in that bolt pattern are not very common.... 16 are very common off the old power wagons..... probably would not be hard at all to trade someone straight across for 16" wheels. .... 9.00-16 are fairly tall... change the carrier and you can put 3.54 gears in those axles ,but you will have to reuse the side gears that the axle slides into because you more likely have the coarse axle shafts. ... 8.25 20 tires would be miserable driving. .. (lumber wagon). That truck likely doesn't have power steering either. Another thing to consider is that taller tires make your brakes less effective, an area that is pretty weak with stock sized tires .......89-91 6cyl never had an intercooler , and in your application one would not be necessary. ..... the 89-91 should fit in the truck without butchering anything, but you might have to use the 89-91 radiator. ... sae housings are not as streamline as the factory housing, therefore may require butchering up your nice cab...... getrag transmission is not weak or unreliable as I tow up to 26,000 gross and don't have problems with it. .. you could get by with a 2wd version in your application. The 201 should last for a long time with only 9k on it now ,as long as you are not going to try pulling trees out of the ground or other nonsense. ..which driveshafts are under the truck now? They have used the 1310 size which are very small, or the 1410 size which is same as Cummins truck size..... if you have the 1310 joints then the driveshafts will break long before the 201.....
 

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Discussion Starter #48
I won’t know until the truck is home as far as shafts. I do intend on adding power steering. I know the tires and wheels are odd balls. I just have to find a running parts truck. I own a Bobbed deuce that has 48s with no power steering It’s a great truck but have to sell it to fund this truck project and I need something smaller at this point in time. I have nothing set in stone yet as what direction I go it’ll all come down to what I can find.
 

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Ya the flywheel that fits the SAE#3 that fits the Spicer is 1000$ to as high as 1400$ Just for the flywheel 13” clutch the SAE#2 You have to have a multifuel Aluminum adapter ring reworked to fit the Cummins engine 14”clutch. The effort and expense is worth it as the Spicer is way stronger than an Nv4500 and is a fraction of the price even rebuilt. Also plenty of USA made parts. Unlike the NV4500 and it’s special gear oil. It’s just the parts to mate it is where it’s more of a pay wall. In my research no other combos will work to mate a Spicer 3053a to a Cummins. I am glad to talk about and share my ideas and research with everyone as well as get different opinions on things. I would have done the Slant 6 route if I didn’t need it to go highway speeds but I need 60 or 70mph not screaming down the road. It kinda has me all over the place thinking and researching ideas for the swap.
Not sure why the slant 6 would have you screaming down the highway? You gear it properly, just like any engine.

I have a 4500 right now, and while it has been trouble-free so far I don't know how long that is going to last. I have the HP and torque to tackle any grade I want in 5th gear at 65+ MPH, and since the engine is screaming in 4th gear at that speed I run it in 5th. I have a splined nut lock that I built which is a copy of the Fifth Gear Repair lock, so there is no possibility of the nut backing off and causing a problem that way. That simply transfers the failure somewhere else. If the 5th mainshaft gear cannot come loose, the next things to fail is the 5th mainshaft gear itself (from heat and fatigue), the splines on 5th synchro hub, or you may clean the teeth off 3rd gear (both counter and speed gears). Another failure point is the input gear and its mating countershaft gear. Since they are loaded when running in any gear besides 4th, they accumulate the most fatigue time.

Since I know replacing the 4500 will be a matter of when, not if, I am already exploring options. Running a G56 is a possibility. There is a guy on Cummins frum who has 1.3 milllion miles on his 12V Dodge, and after going through 12 NV4500's he finally swapped in a G56 6 speed and said it has been flawless. I've heard both good and bad from others. with most bad being high HP guys. The nice thing about the G56 is that it literally bolts right in; since I have a 1-⅜" input in my 4500 and the G56 uses a 1-⅜" input as well I could use my existing clutch. The bad is that it is quite a bit longer than the 4500, and the Blazer doesn't exactly have a long wheelbase able to accommodate a long powertrain assembly. I would end up with a very short driveshaft, and no possibility of installing a crawler box if I so desired. The ZF S6-650 6 speeds used in Ford and Chevy diesel trucks is another option. Many claim it is all around better and nicer shifting vs the G56, but an expensive conversion flywheel housing would be needed and it has the same length issues as the G56.

The most likely swap suspects would be either an Eaton-Fuller FSO6406 or FSO8406, or go automatic with an Allison 6 speed. The Ally is easier to adapt to both the engine and a transfer case, and it would be easier on my bum ankle. The Fuller 6 speeds are extremely tough, and quite a bit shorter than the G56 or ZF 6, but require more work and mods to swap in and to attach a married transfer case. I'd prefer the automatic for most driving, but the manual is great off road when you want to cruise at low speed. It's gonna be a very difficult choice...
 

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Discussion Starter #50
Ya I understand completely what you are saying. I would love to put the slant in it but I’m not sure it can handle a 7000lb truck. Illl be happy if I can get 15mpg and up to 60 or 65 and not wear something out too fast doing so. I’m not a speed guy either I just want enough to make it a solid all around truck that’ll I’ll enjoy upgrading and working on:)
 

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Your project aims should be no problem. A 7000 lb truck can get 15 MPG or a good bit more depending on the engine choice and the driver. Road speeds of 60-65 MPH should be workable as well. My '90 F250 weighs a bit over 6000 lbs and I've driven it across the map weighing in at near 9000 lbs. At the 6000+ mark I got around 18 MPG with the 7.3 diesel. With 9000 lbs it got 15-16 MPG. The IH 7.3 IDI is far less efficient than the Cummins. A buddy of mine had a Dodge 5.9 and he could break into the 20 MPG area when empty and around 17-18 MPG when heavy. Main thing is keeping the engine RPM in the peak area around 1800 RPM plus or minus a few hundred.
 

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Discussion Starter #52
Ya a Diesel engine would be my first choice as far as a swap. I figured that it would do a lot better with a heavy truck than a gasser. I luckily have the luxury of taking my time making this decision and shop around for good deals. The worst part of this that I have dreaded is selling my other truck even with very specific ad description I’ve had offers for boats n Mud junkers. That is the part I hate dealing with the most. I will not cut my nose off despite my face. I just have too much to take care of between my house n this new truck. I just have no use for toys. So definitely gets annoying. Then I also get people asking me for advice on there M35a2s through me selling it that really infuriates me I’m not a free shop do your own research and open a discussion online like I am and go that route don’t contact me through a for sale ad for advice. I don’t mind helping someone but go through the appropriate channels for that SMH 🤦‍
 

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Ya I understand completely what you are saying. I would love to put the slant in it but I’m not sure it can handle a 7000lb truck. Illl be happy if I can get 15mpg and up to 60 or 65 and not wear something out too fast doing so. I’m not a speed guy either I just want enough to make it a solid all around truck that’ll I’ll enjoy upgrading and working on:)
Don't misunderstand me. While I am saying that the slant can handle a 7000lb truck, I would far prefer a 5.9 or 6.7 Cummins in that application. The slant will get the job done, but it will be very slow to accelerate (especially if the truck is loaded or hauling a trailer!) and use more fuel than the diesels. Really, the only gas engines I would consider for a truck that large is something with at least 380 cu in, and preferably a big block with 440+ cu in. It'll drink gas like it's free, but it would have plenty of power. Again, a 5.9 or 6.7 diesel is really the way to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
I have been looking at an Eaton transmission it’s an FS6005A 5 speed I can not find any information on its specs online at all. I’m just curious about it it was from an F700 and I think was in a frieghtliner.
 

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Probably need to contact Eaton. That transmission is near 30 years old. Pretty sure it used an SAE2 mount but not sure about the gear ratios. The FS6105A may have been a replacement.
 

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Probably need to contact Eaton. That transmission is near 30 years old. Pretty sure it used an SAE2 mount but not sure about the gear ratios. The FS6105A may have been a replacement.
Only Eaton trans' designated 'FSO' are OD, an 'FS' trans might not be useful.

Ed in Co.
 

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I have been looking at an Eaton transmission it’s an FS6005A 5 speed I can not find any information on its specs online at all. I’m just curious about it it was from an F700 and I think was in a frieghtliner.
It will be similar to an FS6305A, but an earlier revision as indicated by the "0" in the second number vs the "3" in the later, and probably current, revision. It is a non-overdrive trans, as are all of the Eaton-Fuller FS-series 5 speeds. Gear ratios are 7.22, 3.89, 2.22, 1.39, and 1.00. Torque rating is 660lb-ft.
 

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I got a Eaton 4205A that I pulled from my 4bt and was thinking of using it till I found out its a direct 5th. Strong trans but no OD. To bad you are not closer, its just sitting in my tent garage getting tired of tripping over it lol.
 

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I don't think any frame strengthening would be needed even is utilizing the engine center mounts. I have a one ton frame, but I am using the standard frame-size engine mounts that would be used for a SB, BB, or 6.2 diesel. On top of it, my tube motor mounts are fairly minimalist and none of the material is heavier than 1/4". The tube used in the mounts is 1-½" x .120 wall 4130. The frame itself has a material thickness of around .240". Even with a 12V sitting atop it and spending plenty of time getting bounced around off-road as well as a LOT of on-road miles, the frame and mounts are perfectly fine. I think a lot of guys grossly overestimate the weight of these engines and/or the strength required of the frame and motor mounts.











You do need a decently robust and rigid motor mount though:

When installing the 6.9 I had to box the frame from the mounts to front crossmember, which I also had to remove and replace with one I made. Like most all older vehicles it had the flywheel housing & frt crossmember mounts. Had no room for a crossmember. Made a set of mounts before the box and it twisted the double frame. Took another piece of power wagon frame split it down the middle stuffed it inside the frame left to right & right to left then welded it back together.
 
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