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Discussion Starter #1
First off, many thanks to all the contributors on this forum that helped me in my initial research, planning, and tracking down of components to start this project. :)

This is my 4th restoration project (1965 cobra-jet powered T-bird, 1995 Honda CBR, 1979 Formula Thunderbird being the first three) and I am excited about the 4bt, I miss my old 97 Cummins Ram and my old '78 Ford, so finding a way to marry my two loves in one package sounds like gravy to me!!!

This project started life as a 1977 Ford F-150 with a 390, NP435, and NP205. I have just finished blasting and coating the frame, my motor showed up today (thanks mrander) and I'll be ready to get some real work done soon (It's much more fun putting it together than taking it apart)

Setup will be:
4bt Cummins, P7100 low mount turbo.
Intercooler
NV4500 from a Dodge Cummins
NP205
Ford 9" rear
Dana 44 front
Bulletproof Steering components
Hydroboost braking
33" tires, 2" lift
Custom flatbed
Urethane coated body panels, inside and out on everything.
Dual Electric Fan
Modern split bench seat
38 gallon main tank, 20 gallon saddle tank for those long weekends in the hills
Tentatively a water/meth injection set-up, still debating this one

Pics to come when my hands are not so greasy.

Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter #4

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What's your back up plan for when the Dana 44 with 33" tires goes out to lunch?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
What's your back up plan for when the Dana 44 with 33" tires goes out to lunch?
Drop the front driveline and unlock the hubs. ;)

I'm not worried about it, the truck will mostly be a highway cruiser with the majority of 4 wheel drive encounters being on the snow and ice. Maybe a couple long weekends in the mountains, fire service roads mostly.
 

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Lol, great reply!

Seriously though, you really should consider a ZF5 instead of the NP435. I had a NP435 and it was painful to drive on the highway. Since I put the ZF5 in, now it is great on the interstate!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Lol, great reply!

Seriously though, you really should consider a ZF5 instead of the NP435.
I've got an NV4500 out of a Dodge Cummins 4x4 and an adapter into my NP205, I will miss the gear whine of that NP435 though....probably wouldn't be able to hear it over the sound a 4bt anyway.. :(
 

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So far I love my 79.

I agree with David and install the zf. I have no trouble with my t-18/435 but having a OD will help greatly when on the highway.

My truck has been upgraded with a rear dana 60 and the dana 44 upgrade to 8-lug outers.

If you would like any information, please let me know.

Below is the link to my build thread.
 

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I've got an NV4500 out of a Dodge Cummins 4x4 and an adapter into my NP205, I will miss the gear whine of that NP435 though....probably wouldn't be able to hear it over the sound a 4bt anyway.. :(
With the proper sound proofing, the 4bt isn't that loud inside the cab. I have to open windows to hear the exhaust on my truck. I can hear the turbos, but they sound way better when the window is open!!! BTW, wicked swap. Need to see some pics.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Here are some pics of what I've done so far:

1. The truck as I purchased it
2. The frame as finished and coated, plus steering from bulletproofsteering.com
3. The 4bt cleaned up and detailed; black and silver
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Pulled my 4bt off the crate yesterday, bolted up the flywheel housing and the flywheel from South Bend Clutch. Painted my bellhousing and worked on fabricating a new transmission mount.

Here are some pics to share:

1. 4bt swinging on the chain
2. NV4500 on the bench
3. South Bend flywheel
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Quick update with a few pictures:

1. Cab on it's back with the underside sanded, degreased, primed, and coated with rubberized undercoating from Rustoleum. No rust so far, and hopefully it will stay that way.

2. My workbench with my np205 exploded all over it. You might notice the gray looking paint on the gears, that's not paint, it's actually Dow Corning 3400A. 3400A is a thermo-set resin, baked on to the parts at 400 degrees, and it contains massive amounts of MOS2 and graphite. If the oil film were ever to break down under extreme pressure between the gear teeth, this coating is so smooth that under the microscope it is about as flat as can get. The Molybdenum Disulfide acts as a solid lubricant and will prevent wear on the gear faces. I also coated the bearing races, yokes, and shift rails to help make life easier on the seals.

3. Don't flame too hard, this is my first ever fabrication job (other than brackets and other chintzy things). I have my passenger side frame stand done and it is built like Mack Strong.

That's the news, is this project over yet?
 

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i've already seen some people using carbon-coating (diamond-look carbon) and ceramic powder coating to act as a solid lube... but what about this 3400a? maybe cheaper than the ceramic and carbon stuff...
 

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Discussion Starter #16
i've already seen some people using carbon-coating (diamond-look carbon) and ceramic powder coating to act as a solid lube... but what about this 3400a? maybe cheaper than the ceramic and carbon stuff...
3400A runs about $150 a quart....you could probably coat about 10 transfer cases with that amount and still have some left over. The tedious part is the labor, every surface needs to be sandblasted with 80grit aluminum dioxide, phosphate blast is recommended for extra adhesion but as long as the parts are completely dry and you are in a low humidity area, it shouldn't be a problem. The issue is making sure you are careful in clearance areas, this stuff is resistant to pretty much every chemical out there except the solvent Dow Corning makes, so if you get too thick where it shouldn't be, it takes a lot of sanding to clean it up. I used an airbrush and was getting about 40 micron per coat, but on my roller bearing surfaces I still had to do a bit of 'working in' with a piece of scotch brite to get everything to fit nice.

I'm not too familiar with using ceramic or carbon as a dry lubricant, I would suspect that it is more of just a physical barrier to wearing the metal surface than it is a lubricant. 3400A uses alot of MOS2 and graphite as the lubricant, these are proven solid lubes that you'll find in a lot of extreme pressure lubricants. Dow is working with GM on this technology to design an engine that will not require oil; biggest drawback so far is that oil disperses a massive amount of heat away from friction surfaces, and in internal combustion engines heat is a killer, as of yet they haven't figured that problem out.
 

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I'm not too familiar with using ceramic or carbon as a dry lubricant, I would suspect that it is more of just a physical barrier to wearing the metal surface than it is a lubricant. 3400A uses alot of MOS2 and graphite as the lubricant, these are proven solid lubes that you'll find in a lot of extreme pressure lubricants. Dow is working with GM on this technology to design an engine that will not require oil; biggest drawback so far is that oil disperses a massive amount of heat away from friction surfaces, and in internal combustion engines heat is a killer, as of yet they haven't figured that problem out.
graphite actually is carbon... btw the idea in these carbon and ceramic coating is to create a protective shield to reduce friction, just like any liquid lubricant does, but they're not actually intended to replace liquid lubricants as they don't have the same heat dispersive features...
 

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This should be pretty cool, I want to see it sometime!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
graphite actually is carbon... btw the idea in these carbon and ceramic coating is to create a protective shield to reduce friction, just like any liquid lubricant does, but they're not actually intended to replace liquid lubricants as they don't have the same heat dispersive features...
Well, graphite is an allotrope of carbon; just like diamond and lonsdaleite are the same base material (carbon) but with a different molecular structure. The coefficients of friction for graphite compared to base amorphous carbon and diamond on steel with dry surfaces are fairly vast (µ-.1 graphite/.14 amorphous carbon/.15 diamond). I'm not too versed on the carbon coatings you are referring to (weather you meant diamond, amorphous, graphite, or other) but there are definite advantages/drawbacks to each.

Turns out that the lubricity of graphite is mostly due to the air and moisture that is trapped in between it's thin leaf like layers; when I was working at NASA-JPL we worked on a project where two plain bearings had to be lubricated when the space shuttle doors were open, and our testing in vacuum conditions actually put graphite on par with normal carbon because no air/moisture was available to penetrate the graphite layers. I think we ended up using a flouro-silicone grease in that application.

Even then, a hydrodynamic lubrication condition (with oil/grease/water/glycerine/etc) is far superior to any solid lubricant because that film has the lowest friction coefficient, and exactly as you remarked it carries away tremendous amounts of heat from the friction zone. When the pressures are intense enough to create a boundary condition between the substrates though, it never hurts to have a solid lube to protect the substrate.
 

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More pics folks!!!

1. Got the NP205 bolted up to the NV4500 and the drivelines in as well.
2. A close up of the NP205, had to re-drill the crossmember for the transmission mount as well as modify the mounting for the transfer case, but it fits well and it's snug in the cradle now. Also had to modify the crossmember with a BFH to give the transmission enough clearance to wiggle.
3. Top view of the fun, man it feels good to unhook the engine crane and not have anything hit the floor.
 

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