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Discussion Starter #381
I believed the turbo oil inlet lines were the same for the Holset HX30W. Looking at post-https://www.4btswaps.com/threads/dumb-question-about-hx30w-oil-supply-line.107079/ char1355 mentions 12 types of this same turbo. I am adding pics of mine to hopefully find out what fitting I need for the supply line. The oil supply line looks like a male 3/8 NPT fitting.


Oil Supply Line.jpg Holset Turbo Information.jpg
Holset Turbo Information.jpg
Turbo Oil Inlet.jpg
 

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A couple of observations. The turbo (Holset HX-30) has a 2-1/2 inch outlet. The intercooler has a 3-inch inlet and 3-inch outlet. I ordered the air intake plate which came in and will allow the mounting of the Cummins horn 3918530 which is still on its way. I am assuming the Cummins inlet horn is 3 inches as well (thoughts?) I also noted the oil supply line from the filter housing does not fit this turbo and appears to be a size larger than the turbocharger accepts. I thought this was a direct hook-up in place of the stock turbo (More thoughts).

Is the intake horn 3 inches?
What size oil line fits the HX-30 turbo?

Thanks,
Tim
The intake horn on my 1998 12 valve is 3".
 

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The coupling on air intake elbow 3918530 should be 3".Air connections on the Dodge intercoolers were 3" as well and so was the piping. Dodge turbos also had 3" outlets on the 12 valves. Now, your HX30W 4040353 is the one with the 44mm inducer so it is the standard frame HX30W. 3" air inlet and a V band outlet which fits the 2.5" 90 deg outlet elbow. The elbow part is 3918686, clamp number 3918951, O ring seal 3918952, and 1/8" pipe plug 3008465. See drawing below. You'd just use a 2.5" to 3" transition hose to couple to the intercooler plumbing. Oil inlet and drain should be the same size as an HX35W. Only the Super HX30W has different fittings. The oil feed hose needs a male/female adapter to mount it to the turbo. It's the exact same fitting as the one on the oil filter plate. That is Cummins part 3918687 which includes O ring part 3037236. There is also a conical copper sealing washer that goes between the hose and the fitting with is part 3924389. See diagram below. If you need part numbers for the oil drain parts I have a list of those too.
 

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The intake horn on my 1998 12 valve is 3".
All 1994-1998 & 1999-2002 dodge cummins used 3" air intake horns. Just 2 different configurations/styles.
 

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Discussion Starter #386
This air horn is from a 93 12V. Found out that the air horn is 2-1/2 inches. this will alter my piping size from 3 inches to 2-1/2. I will have to use boots that reduce the Intercooler (which are 3 inches inlet and outlet) to reduce down. The elbow for the turbocharger compressor discharge is 2-1/2 inches as well. Here are the pics.
Intake Horn and Heater.jpg Inlet Air Horn Size.jpg Intercooler.jpg
 

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Wasn't aware that the early intercooled elbow was 2.5" The P pump 4bt used that style elbow and it was 2.5". The 6bt part is 3918530 and the 4bt is 3927106. I believe the difference in them is the one you have is a lower profile for using the grid heater where the 4bt type is a bit taller. You have the option as to which end you put the adapter coupling. You can run all 3" pipe and put the adapter at the turbo and intake ends or 2.5" Pipe and the adapter at the intercooler connection. Sort of a toss up.
 

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Discussion Starter #388
Agreed. It is a toss up. I have only decided on the 2.5 inch for room issues as it takes up less space. But you are right, it is a coin toss. And really the 1/2 inch is negligible.
 

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Well, I agree the 2.5" pipe takes up less room and likely cost a little less than 3". You may get a fraction quicker boost since there is less pipe volume to fill, but that may not be measurable. On the intercooler side, a 2.5" x 3" 90 to fit there probably is no more than a 3" x 3". On the pipe are you going to use plain steel, or aluminum, or really get fancy and do stainless?
 

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Discussion Starter #390 (Edited)
Aluminum. I have been eyeballing a set of pipes/hose/clamps on eBay. In consideration of the cost; the intercooler was given to me by my son. I will use radiator paint and turn in flat black so it is not so apparent behind the grill. The piping will be black as well. The heater/inlet horn was about $180.00 (that is with tax and shipping). The reducers with band clamps were $46 (two separate shipments though as I did not know I would need the second until I measured the intake horn yesterday). The piping kit is about $150.00 (would be cheaper but I wanted upgrade from the standard 1.58mm to the 1/16 or 2mm pipes). So, looking at around $400.00 to add an intercooler.
 

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You did OK. Aluminum will probably shed more heat which is a good thing. I don't know if you plan to have the intake heater operational, but you'll need the relay set and wiring harness for that.
 

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Discussion Starter #392 (Edited)
Any drawings and Ideas on a wiring harness for the heater? Any electrical drawings as whole? Saying this, I am figuring out how to hook up electric fans, how to wire the KSB. The starter, alternator and IP shut down seem fairly simple. Looking at the KSB, I believe that would be on a relay as well. That is supposing the temp probe grounds when the proper temperature is reached. which will shift the relay to power 12v to the KSB.
 

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For my grid heater I used a 200 amp continuous duty solenoid from a golf cart application that is controlled by a momentary contact switch mounted in my dash.
 

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Discussion Starter #394
Funny, I have the solenoid from my glow plugs which may suffice. I have that hooked to a momentary switch on my dash board as well. Might be a match. The 6.2 diesel that is currently in the truck will not start as of this weekend. The IP died. I was able to position the truck in my backyard to pull the motor and start the conversion. Hopefully, I will start this coming weekend.
 

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I initially tried a glow plug solenoid IIRC it was a NAPA part and rated at 85 amps it did not last too long and froze up in the on position which caused many headaches......$.02
 

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Discussion Starter #396 (Edited)
Not sure what mine is rated at. It is the original 6.2L diesel solenoid. I will have to look at it more closely and do some research.

Update at 5:00am the following day. The 6.2L glow plug solenoid is 100 amps. Now to fined what the draw of the heater is.
 

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On the Dodge grid heaters there were 2 different systems. The first one used 2 relays wired to 2 different segments of the grid. The truck would activate one or two relays depending of engine temp. They later changed to a single relay setup. I have one of the dual relay harnesses. Not sure if it has all the wires but I'll look. Haven't looked at it in a while. Those connect direct to the batteries and have a fusible link in line in case of failure. The Dodge relays aren't terribly expensive. Dorman part for the replacement is 904-308. In the $40-50 range. You'd just need to decide how to control the relays. Could just be a push button switch. You probably don't need them on more than about 10 seconds. That grid pulls a lot of juice. 3rd photo show the relay unit. On your KSB, which type do you have? Early models have the wax motor type like in the 1st photo below. That one only requires a wire that attaches to the injection pump solenoid. The second version is a solenoid type. That one requires a temp switch that is mounted in the intake plate or a coolant port in the head. That switch turns it on if the temp is low enough. See 2nd photo. On that one you have a hot wire from an ignition switched point to the temp switch and then to the solenoid KSB. On the solenoid type you often see engines with it disconnected. The reason is likely they found out that replaceable solenoid part is $216. It's a Bosch part.
 

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Discussion Starter #398 (Edited)
Great information char1355. I have the wax type KSB. On the picture of the wax type KSB on your post the two wires coming from the KSB; Is one from the ignition and the other going to the injection pump solenoid?
I was looking at the amperage draw on the heater. One website had a guy who remarked the draw of the heater is 205 amps, while another(video below) ran a test
and showed the peak amp draw at 225 and then settled to 215 amps. The current 6.2 Chevy glow plug solenoid is 100amps. To answer the question, I will control the heater with a momentary switch on the dash. I live in the deep south, so I do not expect much use from it. I will replace my solenoid with a 200amp version as well.

I checked my heater elements and found two separate grids. I have a few pics to illustrate a dual element Intake Heater.

Dual Element Intake Heater.jpg Intake Heater Dual Element.jpg Dual Element Close Up.jpg
 

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I think the relays are 100 amp White Rogers. Model 120-901 has a bottom mount and the 120-907 has a back mount.
 

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Yes, that creature sucks a lot of juice. It is actually an item not required for starting unless the the temp get to 20 deg F or lower. Like the KSB, it was more of a smog related item. Now, on the wiring I had to do a bit of reading to figure that out and still don't have all the answers. Here's what I found. The wax motor KSB which is the early type does have a control switch which is mounted in the head coolant port near the back on the driver's side. The info on our site states that there is a jumper wire from the pump solenoid to that switch to power it when the ignition is on. Then a wire runs from that switch to the wax motor KSB. I haven't found a true wiring diagram to verify that. I do have a Cummins one for the solenoid type and I haven't given up on the other one. If the info on our site was correct that doesn't explain the second wire. One possible is it's a ground but I don't think so. Do you have a friendly Dodge dealer near by? If you could find a wiring diagram for the very early 6bt it may have the wax motor type. Also, do you have the serial number of your engine. I might find an answer on quick serve. I don't like to give up on something until I can verify a correct answer. Enough junk info out there without me adding more. One thing I do know is the 2 types of KSB's operate in reverse. The wax motor type is always normally on until 12 volts are sent to it to turn it off. So, if left disconnected your injection pump timing is advanced 5 deg. On the solenoid type it is normally off unless 12 volts are sent to it. It's switch which is in the intake plate is set at around 95 deg to turn off. So when the ignition is first turned on, 12 volts got to the KSB to advance timing and when the intake temp gets high enough the switch turns off. That info makes sense even to my poor brain. Just for info below is the Cummins diagram for the solenoid KSB. It is simple and easy to understand. I want to find one for the wax motor type.
 

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