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Tom, this 2012 picture is all that I can find, don't have a clear memory of the details 8 years later.
129891

Turbo was clocked so that the drain was down. Drain tube (in the block) was rotated toward the turbo. Drain tube (from the turbo) was cut back, and a length of hose connected them. The hose has to stand up to high temperature oil - I think that I sourced the hose from a Cummins parts house west of Phoenix, AZ - not totally sure that my memory is correct... I vaguely remember that the diameter of the drain tubes was not a size that I could find locally. I do remember fiddling with both drain tubes for a while trying to get a good alignment.

Russ
 

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If you are using the standard low, rear turbo manifold the oil drain tube should be part 3912592 which is #6 in the diagram. That part number is now 3918670. About a $100 part.

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Cut the tube and weld it in the correct orientation. That or remove it for a longer flexible drain.
 

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Discussion Starter #424
I do not believe the turbo drain hose is that part number. But might be the one I need. This had the manifold which held the turbo at a slight angle and supported a baby H1C (I believe). I like the way Russ's picture shows the lower tube clocked to about 10 pm. Mine is high noon. I would like to clock as well but am afraid of breaking the seal in the block. Not sure I could ever reseal it correctly. How did you clock and reseal?
 

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A CPL767 that had that weird manifold with the compound tilt used oil drain part 3906663. That's the one you have now. Kind of pricey if you had to buy one. About $150. For the standard rear drop manifold it uses part 3912592/3918670. That one is spec'd on engines with either the small H1C or HX30W.
 

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... I would like to clock as well but am afraid of breaking the seal in the block...
Do not understand... The turbo is mounted to the exhaust manifold - Use a fresh gasket between the turbo and the intake manifold.

I just jack the halves apart a few thousands, gently tap it around to where I want it, and tighten it back up. This way, there is little danger of damaging the internals.

129898

Pulled a turbo out of storage and made a quick mock-up picture. This is a 105 HP turbo, the exact turbo in the picture in the above post.

The 4bt now has a 120 HP turbo (thanks scout4bta) - it was rotated with the same procedure (and 10MM bolts).

Trying to drag up old memories, I got the idea on this website over 8 years ago.

Preparation: Remove turbo and stand it on the workbench, hot side down. Block it up, so it can not fall over and hit the floor - had a close call....

1. Remove the 4 hot side bolts

2. Remove the locking clips

3. Soak the joint with a penetrating oil - Aerokroil is my preference - maybe overnight and another soaking won't hurt...

4. & 5. 10 MM bolt and washer placement must clear the joint and push against the 4 bolts on the cold side. SAE bolts should work, I just know these Metric bolts work - they have the tool marks from this job.

6. Tighten all 4 bolts to "snug".

7. Work a tighten pattern, each nut a couple of flats at a time - suggest 1,3,2,4 - the idea is to extract the turbo halves a few thousandths, with out jamming the joint sideways. The halves do NOT get separated. Another squirt of penetrating oil...

8. Gently rotate the halves to the desired position

9. Install locking clips, and use the same pattern to draw the halves back together.

Tomorrow, I will be away from the computer for a couple of days - got a minor surgery - send me a message if you have any questions.

Russ
 
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Discussion Starter #427 (Edited)
Worked on the drain tube tonight after work. applied some heat and clocked the drain tube which appears to be pressed in the block. Cut and bent the drain tube which comes from the turbo. Now that I have clocked the lower block drain tube it is solid but will move left to right with force. This left me wondering if they were pressed or glued in somehow.

Turbo Oil Drain Solved.jpg Turbo Oil Drain Solve1.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #428
Russ, the clocking of the turbo would not align my drain pipes. The clocking I was talking about was the drain attached to the engine block. The turbo is new so clocking it is relatively easy. The pipe drain on the block wasn't so easy. I tried to heat and bend the lower drain pipe out. After the heat, the pipe was able to be clocked. I can still turn the pipe in the block with force. I hope it doesn't leak. That is what I was referring to. I am not sure if it was pressed into the block or glued with some type of sealer.
 

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That looks like it will work. The drain on my engine block did not want to rotate - thought I was going to crush it...
 

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Yes, that turbo drain pipe in the block is a very tight fit. It's basically pressed in just like the oil dipstick tube. Some of the later model drains that has flex piping had 2 O ring seals instead of that press fit.
 

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Discussion Starter #431 (Edited)
A quick update: I ceramic coated the exhaust manifold, oil drain tube, the turbine housing of the HX-30 with Cerakote Glacier Black. I ceramic coated the compressor, center housing, and wastegate actuator with Cerakote Glacier Silver. This was my first experience ceramic coating anything, so I enlisted a bit of help with the application. I found the hardest part was cleaning the parts sufficiently to complete the coating. In the end, I am happy that I did it and would have no issues doing it again. I did sandblast the parts and used brake cleaner and acetone to clean the surfaces. I ran into an issue with the sandblasting and would recommend changing the blast material (to new blast media) before you start the final prep.

Ceramic Coated Exh Man and Turbo.jpg Ceramic Coated Turbo Charger.jpg Turbo Drain Line.jpg
 

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Looks nice. One thing. You may not have wanted to ceramic coat the center section of the turbo. In that area you want the heat to get out, not stay in. That is where the bearings are. The exhaust manifold and turbine housing you want to keep the heat in because that's the energy that drive the turbo.
 

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Discussion Starter #434 (Edited)
Started the 4BT for the first time today. Oil pressure jumped to 50 psi at idle. 60 psi when revved a bit. I wanted to post the video, but the site does not support mp4 extensions and I am not sure how to convert for this site. The engine ran well. I do have a small bubble that occurs at the base of the number 4 injector every few seconds. (injector seal?) I had another at the base of the head gasket (close to the number 2 cylinder on the exhaust side) the size of a pinhead which surprised me as I was running without coolant for the first start. My neighbor believes it will seal once the engine gets warmed up enough. Kind of scary thinking about all the work that went into the engine. New head, block surfaced, new head gasket, and I was careful when putting the head on the engine block. Torque was completed (with oil on the threads) in accordance with the instructions.
 

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Oil pressure sounds fine. Stock relief valves are set at 65 PSI. That bubble at the injector does sound like it may not be sealing good. The small leak on the head gasket would concern me more. Did you use a Cummins brand head gasket? Definitely need to keep an eye on that one. Are you running without coolant? You do not want to do that for any extended time.
 

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Discussion Starter #436 (Edited)
The engine was running momentarily to ensure it would start and no leaks could be verified. I did use Cummins parts and will keep an eye on the head gasket going forward. The engine started up after proper bleeding of the fuel system and ran great.
 

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Bubbling at the base of the injector:

This injector needs to be rebuilt. It's leaking between the halves. Have the whole set rebuilt.
 

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Discussion Starter #440
They are rebuilt injectors. Picked them up from NASCAR Mark. Albeit, they have been sitting in a bag for over a year. Can that make them go bad? And the bubble is on the outside of the hold-down nut.
 
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