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Discussion Starter #61
Got the chance to spend a solid ten hours in the garage today. Here is my favorite part so far:



No more EEC wires! :)

I've spent at least 15 hours working on the wiring and I still have many more to go. But it's moving in the right direction... slowly, but surely.

When I started removing the transmission/transfer case, the first thing I did was remove the rear driveshaft. The flanges had only three of the four bolts installed and only one was tight! I'm surprised I didn't notice more driveline vibration. I took this before I removed anything:



I won't be removing the transmission and transfer case as an assembled unit again, it was a bear. But I got it out, and here it is:



I noticed something odd on the front of the Dana 44 TTB. The first pic is the passenger side and the second is the driver's. Does anyone have any idea what these are?





I thought at first they were adjustable steer stops, but the threads don't go through the radius arm. They just thread in to the nipples that are welded on the radius arms. I can't figure out what they're for.

I've got to do some figuring as to how exactly I'm going to mount the DOM crossmember to take the weight of the front of the 4BT. I'm thinking about installing a removable crossmember in front of the steering box. (Please excuse the third grade Paint photo editing. I am not an artist.)



Recommendations welcome on the DOM crossmember.

Here is where the Bronco sits now:



I've got the next week off. We're heading up to the Tacoma area for Thanksgiving, but I should have a few days between now and then to get more done.
 

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"Does anyone have any idea what these are?"

They look like shock adsorber mounts to me. Possibly for an option for double shocks...
 
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1989 Jeep Wagoneer, 360v8, 727, stock for now,
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"Does anyone have any idea what these are?"

They look like shock adsorber mounts to me. Possibly for an option for double shocks...
Thats correct.
 

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they are for the bronco coil towers that use dual shocks. No worries anyway since you are doing a SAS!
 

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Discussion Starter #65 (Edited)
I ran some errands yesterday so I didn't get anything done in the garage. This morning I reorganized the garage bay that the Bronco is in. I threw away a bunch of stuff I had accumulated over the past three years and moved some other stuff that didn't need to be in the same bay. I still need to move the DT360 and Eaton 3053A out of this area to make some more room, but for now I'm ready to get some work done.

This is where I started this afternoon. I took this picture because the track bar bracket that is bolted to the engine crossmember is actually a Ford product.



After a couple hours of work, I got the Dana 60 out. (Pneumatic tools are the best thing since Adam met Eve!) Now the F350 looks stripped:



Here is where the D60 ended up for the evening:



Soon I'll have an 8-lug Bronco!

While I was out running around yesterday, I picked this up:



It's the same model as one I used over the course of six months four years ago, drilling well over 1000 11/16" holes in 2" pipe, and I didn't have any problems with it. It's not the milling machine I'd prefer, but it should serve me well for the next five years or so.

I finally got the Bronco stripped down as well:



Today was a good day.
 

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Discussion Starter #66 (Edited)
Started out this morning with the Dana in this condition:



Cut this off:



Did a lot of grinding, and now it's in this state:



A blank slate for a custom-built coilover setup. I'm looking forward to this!

I noticed there is about an 1/8" of play in the stub shafts and main axleshafts on both sides of the pumpkin when you grab the ujoints and twist forcefully... hopefully it's nothing a simple rebuild can't fix.
 

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Always nice to start with a clean slate. You might not have to fabricate you spring mounts. There are probably several companies who make them already. Your upper spring mounts look like they had the provision for the dual shocks if you're so inclined. With that axle under there you could even think 6bt. Of course the auto transmission would have to change. LOL.
 

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Discussion Starter #68
With that axle under there you could even think 6bt. Of course the auto transmission would have to change. LOL.
I actually have a complete 6BT out of a 89 Dodge W350. But this Bronco is going to stay 4BT-powered. I won't need any more power than what this li'l 4-banger is going to put out.
 

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Discussion Starter #70
Not for the rest of the year.
I talked to the guy who I'm buying the Sterling from a couple of weeks ago; he lives in Bend, OR and is working outside. They had just gotten a foot of snow, so he had been set back in his project. Long story short, I will be picking up the Sterling and Dana 50 sometime in early January.
Plus, the wife and I are pretty busy for the rest of the year with the holidays.
This project will be moving ahead in earnest starting in 2016. We have a busy year planned and I need to get this finished because I have some other priorities I will need to be focusing on.
 

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Discussion Starter #71
I can't believe it's already the end of February... I must be getting old.

I picked up the 10.25 and D50 from Jack, the guy from Bend, OR. He had a NICE 1997 F250 SuperCab that he had swapped a Cummins and Dana 60 in to. We had both been bitten by the diesel bug, so we chatted about diesels and Fords for a while.

He pointed me to www.carrickcustoms.com Jack is a young guy and this was his first diesel build. John Carrick guided him along with his Cummins swap. After poking around on his website and seeing some examples of his craftmanship on Jack's F250, I'm considering ordering his steering kit for the D60 going in to my Bronco. I'd prefer to buy local.

I also picked up a new fuse box for the engine bay off Amazon. It's a Blue Sea Systems marine 12VDC 12 circuit with cover model 5029. If you're looking for a fuse box for your engine bay, it's a pretty nice piece.

Other than that, I haven't made much progress. The wife and I have decided to move to Portland within the next few months (we both spend a couple hours a day sitting in traffic and that is getting OLD), so there probably won't be a whole lot of forward momentum on this Bronco for awhile.
 

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Discussion Starter #72
I just found this while browsing around over on FSB and want to save it for future reference:

Well, since I have a pre-1992 Bronco, my VSS is run off of a mechanical speedometer/odometer cable attached to the transfer case tailhousing. The Speed Sensor located in my rear differential is soley for 2-wheel RABS.

1992 and later Broncos changed to use the rear differential Speed Sensor as a combination 4-wheel ABS and VSS Sensor as they upgraded to an electronic speedometer/odometer. This would be an issue that could be overcome with an after market transfer case yoke mounted Speed Sensor, such as the new Brea Auto Electric unit as referenced in my previous post.





I have not yet decided whether to eliminate my RABS as of yet.

Here are pics of the Currie 9" Race Ready Rear End installed in a Full Size Bronco which I have been refering to:



 

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Discussion Starter #73 (Edited)
H2 wheels

I left this thread on a "wanting to move to Portland; will be busy for a few months; no time for Bronco project" note. Well, the wife and I searched for the last month and a half fairly diligently. Long story short, this is not a market we're interested in.

In the evening a couple of Saturdays ago, we found a house we liked, so on Sunday morning we drove by it. We really liked it, so we called the listing agent to see if we could schedule a walk through. We left a voicemail, and she called us back about an hour later. (At this point, the house had been on the market less than 24 hours.) She told us the owners already had two offers and would be making a decision Monday evening. We hadn't even met with the mortgage loan officer at our credit union to get pre-qualified yet, so we passed.

Curious to see if the house had sold, we looked at the listing on Zillow Tuesday evening. The sale price listed was $41K over the asking price! Undeterred, last weekend we met with a realtor to look at a couple of houses. Both were old, overpriced and virtually all of the work that had been done on both places was hacked together. The realtor had a family thing she had to go to, so she left. Jenn and I looked at one more house. It was literally about 80 feet from one of the local Interstates. To say it was noisy is an understatement. :rolleyes: So yeah, not the time to buy.

The good news is, I now have time to get back to my project!

I picked these up a couple of weeks ago:



They came off a 2004 Hummer H2. They're 17X8.5 and have a 8X6.5 lug pattern. I think they look pretty good... but the hub hole is not big enough for the rear Sterling 10.25 that's going under this Bronco:



I read a thread (on FTE maybe?) about a guy using a dual-flute carbide bit on his router and removing enough material to fit over the hubs of the Dana 60s he had on his truck. I followed his advice and this is what I ended up with:



Problem is, the hub on the Sterling is bigger. So, I called up a machinist buddy of mine and did this yesterday:



And here is the finished product:



Well, not exactly. You can see how the chrome is pitted and oxidized. I plan on getting these sandblasted and powder coated black.

I have read about guys running these wheels on leaf sprung D60s under their F350s using this technique, only to have backspacing clearance issues. (The tires contacted the leaf springs at full lock on the steering wheel.) Fortunately, I will have a coil sprung D60, so I don't think I will have that problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #74 (Edited)
More D60 work

I've decided to use a ground-up approach to this build: start on the axles and work up. The last time I updated progress on the D60, it looked like this:



I spent some time yesterday and this morning working on it, and now it looks like this:



The kingpins are going to need to be replaced, here's the passenger side:



Driver's side:



And here is one of the king pin bushings:



I don't know exactly what material this is, but it has NO place in my front axle. I'll be replacing them with Reid Racing bronze upper kingpin bushings.

For those of you who haven't had the opportunity to yet tear in to a Dana 60, here's a picture of the driver kingpin to give you an idea of the beefy nature of these axles:



I read that the axle tubes have a 1/2" thick wall. :eek: I can say without a doubt, assembled this axle was retardedly heavy. Now that it's basically stripped (except for the ring, pinion, spider gears, some bearings and the yoke) I can move it without slipping a disc.

Here's the diameter of the passenger axle shaft:



Compare that with the passenger stub shaft:



I have concluded that it's time for a full-on, bad-ass SAS rebuild. Here's a teaser:



Stay tuned.
 

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Discussion Starter #75
H2 wheels

Before I dropped the wheels off at the powder coaters this evening, I snapped a couple of pics:



It's kinda hard to tell, but the hub actually flares out to a slightly larger diameter beneath the face of the wheel. I turned these on the lathe to a hub diameter of about 5 1/16". As you can see, it is a pretty good size. Much smaller and they wouldn't fit:



I went to America's Tire and bought new chrome lug nuts. I'll paint the axles once I get them rebuilt/customized, so the Sterling hubs will look a little better. I read somewhere that the offset on H2 wheels is about 1 1/2" less than ideal for these Fords. Once I get the tires mounted on the wheels and the whole assembly mounted on the axles, I'll determine if spacers are a necessity. If they are, I'll get some.

Once I got to the powder coaters I talked with the shop manager for a few minutes. He thought the wheels might not turn out perfect (because of the pitting and oxidation, which was fairly significant). We agreed to use a three-step coating process; one coat of primer and two of color.

My standards are not stratospheric; I'm pretty confident I'll be happy with the finished product. They will DEFINITELY look better than they do now.
 

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Used a 4' 1" drive breaker bar to remove Kpins. And a cable comealong. Put about a 4" arc in breaker bar and smacked the drive end with a brass hammer. Popped off easily. Previously was using a Bosch 1" drive electric impact supposedly rated at 1100ft/lbs. Didnt budge.
 

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The powder coaters around here use some sort of phosphoric acid coat first, color next, clear last. Worked well for me on slightly rusted steel wheels.

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter #78
Used a 4' 1" drive breaker bar to remove Kpins. And a cable comealong. Put about a 4" arc in breaker bar and smacked the drive end with a brass hammer. Popped off easily. Previously was using a Bosch 1" drive electric impact supposedly rated at 1100ft/lbs. Didnt budge.
I've read plenty of accounts of guys trying to use an impact gun. Seems like not much happened except a lot of noise was made.

The best tip I've read is using a cut-off wheel on a 4 1/2" grinder to notch the kingpin above the C, all the way around the base of the kp. (Don't get into the hex area with the cutoff wheel or you'll break the kp when you take it off.) Then crank a little torque on to the kp and it should come out fairly easily. I haven't tried this yet, but I've read it in multiple threads, so I assume it's true.

The powder coaters around here use some sort of phosphoric acid coat first, color next, clear last. Worked well for me on slightly rusted steel wheels.
I didn't mention this, but the guy at the powder coaters brought this up. He said the correct way to remove chrome plating is to take it to a chrome shop and have them dip it in a chemical bath. It will completely remove all of the chrome. Then, bring it to a powder coater and have it coated. The disadvantage is, it's expensive. (This is what he told me, and that makes sense.)

So, I opted to just have the wheels sandblasted and coated. I'll post photos of the finished result. I don't expect perfection. As long as they look pretty good I'm okay with it.
 

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I've read plenty of accounts of guys trying to use an impact gun. Seems like not much happened except a lot of noise was made.

The best tip I've read is using a cut-off wheel on a 4 1/2" grinder to notch the kingpin above the C, all the way around the base of the kp. (Don't get into the hex area with the cutoff wheel or you'll break the kp when you take it off.) Then crank a little torque on to the kp and it should come out fairly easily. I haven't tried this yet, but I've read it in multiple threads, so I assume it's true.
I have done this and it works but takes time and you have to be careful not to damage the "C" what works better is to run a bead of weld around the pin just above the "C" and the heat and contraction from welding will loosen it.
 
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Discussion Starter #80
Got the powder coated H2 wheels back!

After a bit of a delay, I have some good news:



The wheels were dusty when I picked them up. I wanted to blow them off with some compressed air once I got home for the picures. I looked around and realized I don't have a blower attachment for my air compressor. So I just wiped them off with a linty-ass rag I had laying around. That's what you're seeing on the powder coating in the next two pics:





In the next two pics you can see what the wheels will look like on the Sterling. The hub will be painted so it will look mo' betta.





I am very pleased with M&M Powder Coating in Vancouver, WA. I did business there six or seven years ago when it was under different ownership and management. The current general manager, Scott, is a pleasure to do business with. These wheels do not look perfect under close inspection, but considering what I had when I started this process, I am more than satisfied with the finished product. Once they're on the BKO, from three feet away they will look good. I can't ask for more than that.

I highly recommend M&M Powder Coating to anyone in the Vancouver/Portland area looking to get something sandblasted or powder coated. I will definitely do business there again. :)
 
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