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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just wanted to share what I’ve gotten my self into . So far the body was off frame . I made some support for it and managed to get the engine to fit so far .
Wheel Tire Vehicle Car Automotive tire
Motor vehicle Gas Auto part Machine Engineering
Tire Land vehicle Wheel Vehicle Car
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The engine weighs about 750 pounds.
I was going to try a 12 v 6 cylinder but I quickly realized that was no good
 

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I'm just going to add . WHEN I DID MY 4BT INTO MY 72 Bronco. I was so worried about how heavy the BT was . & all I'd read, I now believe the weight problems where written by folks who have not done the swap yet..
Like one guy on here years ago was telling us about his fuel mileage. Then about a year later it came out .. His BT HAD NEVER RUN. So he was just making it all up. No wonder his was getting in the mid to upper 30's.
& Mine gets about 12. on my farm.
... But I pulled a stock 302 from my Bronco & I did replace my front coils with Rancho's supposed to be 2 inch lift.
My BT rides as nice as my gas did. No stiff bounce really all I want from my BRONCO.
.... & REMeMBER those old Rat Rods are supposed to be Raked In the FRONT.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I can see a lot of cracking and breakage in the frame on this one in a while.
I didn’t mention that it is an aftermarket new frame .
Boling brothers is the brand it’s a fully boxed 2X4 frame.
Still think I’ll have problems?
 

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I didn’t mention that it is an aftermarket new frame .
Boling brothers is the brand it’s a fully boxed 2X4 frame.
Still think I’ll have problems
Time and use, misuse and abuse will tell. Being a boxed frame will help for sure. I find it's a tough choice between welded assemblies and riveted sub assemblies. I have a 91 W350 that I would say may have been one of the trucks used in the commercial where they dropped the truck into the screen for the commercial. My frame was fractured on the drivers side where the shock bracket was attached. It was also shattered behind the adaptor bracket for the steering gear, like window glass. Someone had made a poor attempt to fix it with washers and plates bolted in. It took me a lot of skilled welding to repair it and it has lasted for 26 years now and I have rolled the truck once, jumped it in ditches, pulled double wide mobile homes and goose neck trailers loaded with big round bails, back hoes, log skidders, pulled logs from forest to saw mill, even use it to transport a dead 3 axle full sleeper Freightliner to a dealership for repair up and down 10% grades on a 100+ mile haul. Frame hasn't broke yet. I couldn't tell if your frame was a box or channel, I did a restoration of an old 29,A back in the early Y2K but I don't recall if the frame was a box or channel now. From what I can see in the photos is you have a driver side engine support near the bell housing and on the pass side it is towards the front. Obviously you are using an auto with a support in the rear? Probably be good to go. The only thing that I would be concerned about it the issue of breakage at any of the welds. As you have the driver side support directly welded to the frame, I would consider this and any other attachment to the frame rail like this to be the weak points. I would have made a piece of steel that would straddle the rail and spread the load over a larger area and instead of welding a continuous bead, do it in shorter welds with space between the beads. This would reduce heat stress and with the piece straddling the rail, if a crack developed it would have to travel through none stressed frame areas and as you have it now, if the weld fractured, it could allow the engine to drop through the frame where as a saddle would continue to hold the engine in place even if the weld failed. Not too late to change it. By the way that old 29 A was still in the hands of the original owners wife at 94 waiting to go for a final ride in a parade while she was still alive, her husband bought it on the day they married, brand new! You don't hear or see about stuff like that very often. During the restoration process she came to the shop one day and was depressed to see things moving along slowly getting worried she wouldn't live to see the day she could ride in it again. I asked her if she wanted to hear the engine running as at that time I had it on a stand still working on a few details and assisting the body guy with metal replacement. She left the shop in better spirits then when she came in after hearing it run. That car had been sitting in the farm lot for like who knows how many years and the chickens had been using it as a roost and nesting box. I also had a 37 Chevy Deluxe Coupe with a built BBC427 4bolt block,TH700 and narrowed 9 inch. The car got finished by the body shop and driven a short time and the guy was so scared of the engine, he had it pulled and put in a SBC. It won a best engineered award at several shows with what I had done with the BBC and all the drivetrain and exhaust with heat shielding and mandrel tubing all the way, but after that was pulled out I heard it was. sold off and a lot of changes were made to it that didn't match my work or the work it had originally. I had to do a lot of work to the back of the body and when it was done it looked a lot like a 69 Olds 442 below where the bumper used to be, I didn't allow for a rear bumper in the metal reworking, close everything off, it looked a lot better that way. I fabbed up a steel fuel tank and installed it in the original location and had the fill port in stock location too. Later the guy had that removed and installed a crappy plastic tank under the trunk that hung too low and the neck was inside the wheel well and a PIA to get to with the tires he put on. You dam near had to jack up the frame to fill it. Some people just don't get it. I quit doing stuff like that for people because they just don't understand how much work it takes and think time and labor should be free.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Time and use, misuse and abuse will tell. Being a boxed frame will help for sure. I find it's a tough choice between welded assemblies and riveted sub assemblies. I have a 91 W350 that I would say may have been one of the trucks used in the commercial where they dropped the truck into the screen for the commercial. My frame was fractured on the drivers side where the shock bracket was attached. It was also shattered behind the adaptor bracket for the steering gear, like window glass. Someone had made a poor attempt to fix it with washers and plates bolted in. It took me a lot of skilled welding to repair it and it has lasted for 26 years now and I have rolled the truck once, jumped it in ditches, pulled double wide mobile homes and goose neck trailers loaded with big round bails, back hoes, log skidders, pulled logs from forest to saw mill, even use it to transport a dead 3 axle full sleeper Freightliner to a dealership for repair up and down 10% grades on a 100+ mile haul. Frame hasn't broke yet. I couldn't tell if your frame was a box or channel, I did a restoration of an old 29,A back in the early Y2K but I don't recall if the frame was a box or channel now. From what I can see in the photos is you have a driver side engine support near the bell housing and on the pass side it is towards the front. Obviously you are using an auto with a support in the rear? Probably be good to go. The only thing that I would be concerned about it the issue of breakage at any of the welds. As you have the driver side support directly welded to the frame, I would consider this and any other attachment to the frame rail like this to be the weak points. I would have made a piece of steel that would straddle the rail and spread the load over a larger area and instead of welding a continuous bead, do it in shorter welds with space between the beads. This would reduce heat stress and with the piece straddling the rail, if a crack developed it would have to travel through none stressed frame areas and as you have it now, if the weld fractured, it could allow the engine to drop through the frame where as a saddle would continue to hold the engine in place even if the weld failed. Not too late to change it. By the way that old 29 A was still in the hands of the original owners wife at 94 waiting to go for a final ride in a parade while she was still alive, her husband bought it on the day they married, brand new! You don't hear or see about stuff like that very often. During the restoration process she came to the shop one day and was depressed to see things moving along slowly getting worried she wouldn't live to see the day she could ride in it again. I asked her if she wanted to hear the engine running as at that time I had it on a stand still working on a few details and assisting the body guy with metal replacement. She left the shop in better spirits then when she came in after hearing it run. That car had been sitting in the farm lot for like who knows how many years and the chickens had been using it as a roost and nesting box. I also had a 37 Chevy Deluxe Coupe with a built BBC427 4bolt block,TH700 and narrowed 9 inch. The car got finished by the body shop and driven a short time and the guy was so scared of the engine, he had it pulled and put in a SBC. It won a best engineered award at several shows with what I had done with the BBC and all the drivetrain and exhaust with heat shielding and mandrel tubing all the way, but after that was pulled out I heard it was. sold off and a lot of changes were made to it that didn't match my work or the work it had originally. I had to do a lot of work to the back of the body and when it was done it looked a lot like a 69 Olds 442 below where the bumper used to be, I didn't allow for a rear bumper in the metal reworking, close everything off, it looked a lot better that way. I fabbed up a steel fuel tank and installed it in the original location and had the fill port in stock location too. Later the guy had that removed and installed a crappy plastic tank under the trunk that hung too low and the neck was inside the wheel well and a PIA to get to with the tires he put on. You dam near had to jack up the frame to fill it. Some people just don't get it. I quit doing stuff like that for people because they just don't understand how much work it takes and think time and labor should be free.
Very in depth reply, thank you for sharing your knowledge. Sounds like you have put some time in !
This is my first build so I’m learning as I go and hope not to be working backwards.
As far as the transmission, it’s a manual 4 speed T19 from Borg Warner . It’s what was in the Bread/ box trucks. Hope it will like the torque..
Thanks for your recommendations on strengthening the mounts ..
 

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The T19 has no problem with the torque. Main issue is the lack of an OD gear. If you have a high enough rear axle ratio that won't be much of an issue as this isn't a very heavy vehicle. Need to calculate with your tire diameter and work out the ratio so the engine is operating in the 1700-2000 RPM area. That is where it will put out the most torque and give the best fuel economy. You can rev higher to shift gears but the ideal sweet spot is around 1800 RPM.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The T19 has no problem with the torque. Main issue is the lack of an OD gear. If you have a high enough rear axle ratio that won't be much of an issue as this isn't a very heavy vehicle. Need to calculate with your tire diameter and work out the ratio so the engine is operating in the 1700-2000 RPM area. That is where it will put out the most torque and give the best fuel economy. You can rev higher to shift gears but the ideal sweet spot is around 1800 RPM.
Thanks for the info, and I completely understand. I need to do the math to figure it out. Luckily I need a rear end!
 
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