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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an 02 F150 with the 4.2L V6 and a M5OD-R2 with 3.55 gearing. I would like to get some info on what it would take to swap a 4BT in. Will a M5 bolt up to the 4BT and can it handle the engine with an upgraded clutch? What all would be needed in order to get the engine running (ie fuel pump, wiring, I'm guessing an intercooler). I'm just not extremely familiar with engine swaps into modern (computer controlled) vehicles so how would the computer that's in the truck need to be hooked up to keep my gauge cluster from becoming a christmas tree? Would I be able to remove the computer period? Things like that. Any help would be appreciated.
 

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I always thought that the computer would have to be eliminated. is your cluster analogue or digital?
 

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There is a great article of a 4BT cummins going into a 1500 chevy in the December 2010 issue of Diesel World magazine. This truck just swapped the sensors from the old V6 engine into the 4BT and then just extended or shortened wires as needed. The crank position sensor had to be moved to a custom machined balancer and the same with the speed sensor in the transmission. The 4BT now uses the alternator from the old engine that was in the truck before it but with custom brackets.
I also want to do this swap for better mileage into my 2003 F150 when my 4.6L V8 wears out. It doesn't look like it is going to happen anytime soon because it has 135,000 miles on it and still runs great!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's not only the better mileage I'm after but also the ability to actually tow a decent trailer with an upgraded clutch. Now the question is, did they use an ISB or a AA? I know somewhere around 2003 Chevy started using electronically controlled throttles, making an ISB a better option while Fords didn't get the electronically controlled throttles until the 2004 models. Im just ready for a Cummins and am really curious to see how a 4000lb truck would react with a 4BT after seeing how my father's 8000lb Mega Cab gets 26MPG with a 6BT ISB while it is completely stock.
 

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my dakota weights in at 5000lbs. The 4bt has no problems pushing my truck around. Although my 4BT isn't stock anymore lol!!! Now, when it comes to 4BT swaps in newer trucks, only a handfull have been done and retained the stock computer. Don't know if any have been done in newer F150's though. If you can put all the sensors from your original motor onto the 4BT and have them send the right signals back to the computer, you should have no problems. If it's something you want to do, start digging up wiring diagrams and read to see how the electrical side of your truck works. My dakota is probably simpler then your F150, and I spend weeks looking at my trucks wiring diagrams and researching how everything worked together, and then some of it was trial and error once I got the motor in and running in the truck.
 

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Your in trouble there, old boy. The F150 never came with a diesel and you're not allowed to put an older engine into a newer truck. Ask me why I moved to Kentucky. You need to go with a newer diesel - an ISB Cummins maybe or an older Ford diesel truck for a 4bt. Find out what NCDOT says - if there is a way. By the way - I took my 84 Ford F150 with the EPA F5L 912 Deutz to town and back today and it feels like flying. Can't believe it's 100 hp.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Your in trouble there, old boy. The F150 never came with a diesel and you're not allowed to put an older engine into a newer truck. Ask me why I moved to Kentucky. You need to go with a newer diesel - an ISB Cummins maybe or an older Ford diesel truck for a 4bt. Find out what NCDOT says - if there is a way. By the way - I took my 84 Ford F150 with the EPA F5L 912 Deutz to town and back today and it feels like flying. Can't believe it's 100 hp.
See Texas has no diesel emissions. I am planning on running the 4BT, not the ISB. The rule on engine swaps for me is that the engine has to have all the emissions from what it came off of. Being an engine before DPF, all I need is a muffler. However, this probably means disabling the check engine light or rewiring it as a overheat light or something. And actually the F150's did get 4BT's from the factory, they were only sold in South America though.
 

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See Texas has no diesel emissions. I am planning on running the 4BT, not the ISB. The rule on engine swaps for me is that the engine has to have all the emissions from what it came off of. Being an engine before DPF, all I need is a muffler. However, this probably means disabling the check engine light or rewiring it as a overheat light or something. And actually the F150's did get 4BT's from the factory, they were only sold in South America though.

Howdy Tex, was talking to the guy from NC, as I said talk to "NCDOT" and my post was right under his last one. 4bts in South American vehicles are irrelvant to a discussion of US/EPA requirements, however much we envy them or would like to get ahold of them. Federal requirements (EPA) still demand an engine of the same year or newer and that the truck originally had a diesel. Correct me if I'm wrong.
 

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Your in trouble there, old boy. The F150 never came with a diesel and you're not allowed to put an older engine into a newer truck. Ask me why I moved to Kentucky. You need to go with a newer diesel - an ISB Cummins maybe or an older Ford diesel truck for a 4bt. Find out what NCDOT says - if there is a way. By the way - I took my 84 Ford F150 with the EPA F5L 912 Deutz to town and back today and it feels like flying. Can't believe it's 100 hp.
I was pretty sure that that would be the case.But , am interested in any info on the conversion of newer vehicles.
 

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Federal requirements (EPA) still demand an engine of the same year or newer and that the truck originally had a diesel. Correct me if I'm wrong.
I think that's a part of California emissions (which other states can adopt), not Federal. I'm not sure about the legal differences between emissions and inspections laws......... as each state does has different inspection laws, but there are only two sets of emissions rules....... CA and 49-state.

.....or it could be one of those convoluted no one really knows, different answer depending who you ask situations.
 

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See Texas has no diesel emissions. I am planning on running the 4BT, not the ISB. The rule on engine swaps for me is that the engine has to have all the emissions from what it came off of. Being an engine before DPF, all I need is a muffler. However, this probably means disabling the check engine light or rewiring it as a overheat light or something. And actually the F150's did get 4BT's from the factory, they were only sold in South America though.
the 4bt had been a factory option to southern american f250sd, f350sd, f550 and f550sd... f150 had been fitted with brazilian mwm engines (early ones were 226-series, then changed to the 4.10 and later ones came with the 229-series), but the '97 model year had the option of a 2.5L mercedes-benz engine for 2wd versions... before the f150 be phased out in brazil for the '99 model year, the f550 had been offered with both 4bt and mwm 229 engines while the f150 was offered only with the mwm except some export versions fitted with the cummins but these are extremely rare...
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Howdy Tex, was talking to the guy from NC, as I said talk to "NCDOT" and my post was right under his last one. 4bts in South American vehicles are irrelvant to a discussion of US/EPA requirements, however much we envy them or would like to get ahold of them. Federal requirements (EPA) still demand an engine of the same year or newer and that the truck originally had a diesel. Correct me if I'm wrong.
Emission equipment is regulated on newer vehicles. Texas gassers are inspected for emissions equipment to make sure they are there. A few counties in the state actually test for emissions. I know for a fact in Texas, you can replace a gas EFI system with a carbureted system as long as all the emissions equipment is on and working for that particular engine ie, the equipment a production vehicle with that engine left the factory with for that model year. Diesels in Texas are emissions exempt however. As far as the EPA is concerned, diesels burn much more efficiently than gassers, they just like to pump out soot.
 

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As far as the EPA is concerned, diesels burn much more efficiently than gassers.
not just this is true, but also diesels tend to have less failures due to low-quality fuels and can be used with real environmentally-friendly alternative fuels like wvo and wmo, avoiding them to be disposed inappropriatedly in the environment, reducing risks of soil and water contamination...
 

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Hey dlcoffey, there is a guy on here who did a 2003 expedition. I think he had a ring machined for the tach sensor. I am going to do a 2000 Expedition and I would bet that the f150 is very similar to the Expedition. Do a search for CR Magruder and send him a PM. Could you post up pictures of the engine compartment? Is your F150 4 X 4 by chance? I would like to see your motor mounts if you used an automatic transmission 4R100 model, Thanks
 
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