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1972 F250 4x4, 78 d44, np205
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, I’ve been collecting parts to transplant a 4bt and wanted to start a build thread for the benefit of others and myself since I have no background with diesel and I’ve received some good advice from others so far.

I found a package deal of a non running 4bt on a 95 dodge nv4500 drivetrain.

I’m going the long route and going through everything for reliability as I like the piece of mind knowing what I have got. Expensive education.

It was a dodge 2wd nv4500hd so to keep driveline angles better and maintain the divorced setup to the 205 I swapped the short 2wd Chevy mainshaft/housing/5th gear and went through replacing synchros and bearings using the Allstate gear kit with Koyo bearings which sound to be on par with the timken taken out. It got a new 2nd gear and dampener yoke and speedo/output bearing sleeve from torque king. I like that 5th gear issues are not an issue with this design as the yoke holds the spacer and 5th gear on. I used the 95 dodge shop manual for rebuild instructions and specs. It seemed a bit more detailed than the torque king manual which did have some good diagrams and tips.

I will get some pictures up!
 

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1972 F250 4x4, 78 d44, np205
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thanks Mauser48, I found a lot of good info from the members on FTE and fordification as well as the ford truck shop manual.

131249


There was a month wait to bring the block and rotating assembly to the machine shop. Two weeks ago I dropped the block off and the Cummins b series shop manual with sticky notes in for specs. Wishful thinking, I suppose, that the manual will be consulted but he’s done a few 390’s for my uncle which run well and he’s in a no-nonsense agricultural area, so I suppose that’s my piece of mind that it’ll be done right.

131250


The engine was without a data tag but was a Case designation off the IP. #3piston was melted and walls scored so will probably be bored .020 over standard.

Should I be sure to order automotive IC pistons because this was a construction, probably not intercooled engine, or just order pistons off the 9043 number on the piston face? There were three rings on each piston. The engine had a bunch of different stuff, school bus paint, dodge black, then Cummins beige, so it might be a big mix of stuff needing sorted through.

I look forward to hearing what other bump and dent side members’ experience is. I see a few 6bt bumpsides and dent sides with nv4500’s but it seems like there are mostly zf5 4bt bumpsides.
Sam
 

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Beautiful truck. Absolutely love a bumpside on bias plies. My 4bt is going in my 95 f150. I almost sold it for a bumpside but the f150 is such a good candidate I couldn't get rid of it.
 

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1972 F250 4x4, 78 d44, np205
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Beautiful truck. Absolutely love a bumpside on bias plies. My 4bt is going in my 95 f150. I almost sold it for a bumpside but the f150 is such a good candidate I couldn't get rid of it.
Mauser48, It was a decision without major reservations to go with the 4bt (instead of 6bt) because I've found a number of 67-77 4bt builds where the owners have not said they are starved for power, and many they say they'd do it again. That, and I already completely went through the dana60 rear and 78 dana44. I didn't want to again spend the time and money for a dana 60 up front and probably something more stout in the rear. I probably spent $1500-2000 per axle in bearings and new parts/gears. With a 6bt I might have to again chase a beefier drivetrain to support the 6bt weight, HP and Torque, and I almost never tow.

The hard part was that the gentleman I bought the 4bt from was offering a complete 2003 dodge 2wd 5.9L pickup with a getrag. I hopefully won't be kicking myself down the road for not going with that but it seems like if I get the bases covered well enough there should be power on the table along with the mileage with this 3.9L making the swap worth it for wheeling and long distance traveling.

Reason I say all this is I bet your 95 f150 is probably the perfect size for a 4bt, not too big, not too small AFAIAC.

I'm going to do it this way, someone chime in if I'm wrong here: piece together to the CPL.

It's missing the data tag, but from piston #'s and injection pump, it's a CPL 0730, details: another 4BT engine identification Thanks Levis and Char1355 for helping out there.

So, I don't want to rebuild the engine to the previous CPL 0730 specs, but with CPL 857 (4bta ve, water aftercooled) or CPL 986 (4bta ve, air to air). Thanks Crewcab59 for those CPL's from post on 4bt. I went to a local diesel supply , they said pistons part #3802160 will be the correct bowl size pistons for CPL 857, part #3802248 for CPL 986. I was going to find a new VE pump because the brackets I have are VE.

So, I'm going to piece together to the CPL 857 or 986. Seems like doing the water aftercooled because I'm running a factory AC in there and fitting in the intercooler seems like a complexity to avoid running the aftercooler.

Recommendations on air-air or water-to-air?
Should I piece together to CPL?
 

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1972 F250 4x4, 78 d44, np205
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I found a 'good deal' on a block I couldn't pass up... It says QSP recon block. There's cross hatch (maybe as a clean it up and put it back to work measure). Each cylinder measures 4.033". Will bring it to the machine shop to use the better of the two.

131263


131264


Does anyone see being able to put the radiator on the back side (farther back), then intercooler between radiator and ac condenser? Speculating in the wind here, as having the part in hand is always the surest way to know for fit, but not sure about after or intercooler yet in this stage.

131265
 

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As for building the engine, you don't have to adhere to specific pistons for specific CPL. Cummins changed the piston designs numerous times even in the same CPL. Most of that was smog related. Just have to be sure the combustion bowl is correct for your injectors. VE pumps used a 155 deg spray angle which is a more open bowl. As to whether to use an aftercooler like the CPL 0857 or and air to air intercooler, that is sort of your call but here's some things to consider. If you did the aftercooler I'd consider using 2 radiators. If you use the engine radiator your temp will be limited by engine coolant temp which will be in the 160-180 deg F range or higher. All modern systems use 2 radiators and a separate circulating pump for the aftercooler. Other issues are cost and clearance to objects on the firewall such as brake master or windshield wiper motor. Unless you can find good used parts, the aftercooler setup can get into a good bit of money. There were 2 different aftercooler units available. One shown below is Cummins TB9397 and that one probably costs over $1000 for all the parts, Another issue to be considered is whether you live in a cold area and need an intake heater for a starting aid. There is one available for the aftercooler shown in the second photo. That thing will set up back over $500. Don't know what your plans for the turbo on the engine but one of the HX30W's is a good choice. There again, the turbo used with the aftercooler usually has slip connection on the compressor outlet like in the third photo. Now the other side of the coin is the air to air type. Probably 99% of our guys use that. There are many style units available and the big factor is cost. On that one the turbo would usually be the one with a detachable elbow like was used on CPL 1839. As for the size of the unit the best rule is go as big as you can fit. The one used on the Ford 7.3 is sometimes used. If you look at one of those be sure it is the all aluminum version. The one with the plastic tanks don't have a good reputation. See photo below. Another thing you may need to consider is your radiator. The 4bt generally runs cold so oversized radiators are not needed. Yours may be fine. One thing I noticed is your power steering pump is a Saginaw unit which is exactly what was used on the 4bt. Along those lines you will need to decide whether you want vacuum assist power brakes or hydroboost. If you stay vacuum then you'll need a vacuum pump. There were also several types of those available.
 

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VE engines used both 145 and 155 pistons.

A good choice for pistons is the 89-91 Dodge piston with the upper ring lands relieved.

I think I've mentioned before I have done both 4BT's and 12 valves into Bumpside 4x4's. IMO, the only advantage the 4BT has is fuel economy. You can't possibly beat them for that.

The 12 valve is 1/4 the price to do, fits better and makes great power mildly tuned. 4BT power is abysmal stock, but turned up to 150+ HP they're plenty peppy. Main difference is how that power is made. 4BT will spend almost all of it's time above 2000 RPM. 6BT can set you back in the seat when you punch it in 5th at 35 MPH. 4BT has nowhere near the non-boost torque so driveability suffers. Granted, I have put 100's of thousands of miles in the driver's seat of 4BT powered rigs and I have devolved to choose power and path of least resistance over economy and complexity.

My favorite 4BT swapped rig was an 87 F-150 SWB 4x4 with M5R2 I built. Everything fit and worked like it was made for each other. It was light enough to be quick with the 4BT.
 

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Not sure if this will help or not, but this is Frozen Boost water aftercooler setup on my 1995 Bronco. That wrapped "thing" in the middle is their type 10 watercooler. It's wrapped in R-6 insulation and foil to reflect the heat from engine and exhaust manifold below it (behind the a/c compressor). Water to Air Intercoolers
Then there are 1/2" heater hoses going down to Bosh Cobra 12V water pump installed on the plastic inner fender. Water to Air Pump 0392022002 and from there down to heat exchanger type 118 Air to Water Radiator. That exchanger has 3-12V fans on the manual switch in cabin.
And there's a filler neck to fill it with coolant of course. It is pretty much separate cooling system. The hear exchanger is on angle below main radiator. I can send you pixs if interested. There are gauges to monitor air temp before and after water cooler to monitor the efficiency of the system. Based on this calculator intercooler efficiency calculator - racingcalcs the efficiency is on average 60-75%. If it too hot outside (in Las Vegas) like right now the efficiency drops.
131281
 

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Snugfletough, a 6bt is a very tight fit into a '72 Ford. That engine bay is no where near as long as later models but it probably has been done. If it's 1/4 the cost to do a 6bt that would mean about $30,000 or more to do a 4bt. Don't think that quite adds up.
 

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67-72 Ford, actually all the way to 79 is exactly the same under the hood, the frame is the same in the front, the cab floor and firewall are nearly identical- These engine bays are exactly the same length as a 1st gen dodge is. Using a 91.5 to 93 Dodge for a donor absolutely everything fits from the intercooler back with no compromises.

There is no compromise except for modifying the engine crossmember for a 6BT.

I say 6BT fits better because of the way it is packaged. Overall, the 4BT has everything on it crammed into too tight of a package. The turbo is into the firewall, the timing housing fights the steering box, all kinds of things are compromised on a 4BT because it has all the same bits scrunched up into a shorter package.
 

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1972 F250 4x4, 78 d44, np205
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Char1355, Thanks again for the tip on injectors matching pistons. Mark at Dieseltuff said the same thing.

I believe the air-air intercooler will fit where the radiator currently is, then I'll have to fabricate a support for the radiator where the fan shroud is now. The Condenser stays where it is. Hard to know for at this point but it seems air-air is cheapest, provides the most power, and is simplest. Thanks for the tip on the 7.3 PSD intercooler.

I know theres a Dodge Wabco 414 001 0126 saginaw power steering/vacuum pump that should plug right in:
131287


It could conflict with engine mounts but not sure yet. I'm pretty happy with my brakes now, using disc front from the Dana 44 and drums rear. I don't see any need to switch over to hydroboost at this point.
Sam

As for building the engine, you don't have to adhere to specific pistons for specific CPL. Cummins changed the piston designs numerous times even in the same CPL. Most of that was smog related. Just have to be sure the combustion bowl is correct for your injectors. VE pumps used a 155 deg spray angle which is a more open bowl. As to whether to use an aftercooler like the CPL 0857 or and air to air intercooler, that is sort of your call but here's some things to consider. If you did the aftercooler I'd consider using 2 radiators. If you use the engine radiator your temp will be limited by engine coolant temp which will be in the 160-180 deg F range or higher. All modern systems use 2 radiators and a separate circulating pump for the aftercooler. Other issues are cost and clearance to objects on the firewall such as brake master or windshield wiper motor. Unless you can find good used parts, the aftercooler setup can get into a good bit of money. There were 2 different aftercooler units available. One shown below is Cummins TB9397 and that one probably costs over $1000 for all the parts, Another issue to be considered is whether you live in a cold area and need an intake heater for a starting aid. There is one available for the aftercooler shown in the second photo. That thing will set up back over $500. Don't know what your plans for the turbo on the engine but one of the HX30W's is a good choice. There again, the turbo used with the aftercooler usually has slip connection on the compressor outlet like in the third photo. Now the other side of the coin is the air to air type. Probably 99% of our guys use that. There are many style units available and the big factor is cost. On that one the turbo would usually be the one with a detachable elbow like was used on CPL 1839. As for the size of the unit the best rule is go as big as you can fit. The one used on the Ford 7.3 is sometimes used. If you look at one of those be sure it is the all aluminum version. The one with the plastic tanks don't have a good reputation. See photo below. Another thing you may need to consider is your radiator. The 4bt generally runs cold so oversized radiators are not needed. Yours may be fine. One thing I noticed is your power steering pump is a Saginaw unit which is exactly what was used on the 4bt. Along those lines you will need to decide whether you want vacuum assist power brakes or hydroboost. If you stay vacuum then you'll need a vacuum pump. There were also several types of those available.
 

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This vacuum/PS unit must be supported. Here is a link to my pictures of the home made bracket Scroll down to Post #4:


Russ
 
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1972 F250 4x4, 78 d44, np205
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The NV Trans is buttoned up. Everything always takes twice as long as I think. Best time to work on stuff is late at night after everyone is in bed with NO DISTRACTIONS (y).

Most everything came out in good shape. 2nd gear got replaced because of worn syncro teeth. I took the main and countershaft to a local gear shop to have them remove and install some of the bearings, as having the $100 one-use tool was not a possibility.

I got the kit from Allstate, the parts seemed good quality. I called ahead to ask what bearings came with, Koyo bearings which sound to be on par with Timken.

This started as a Dodge NV4500HD 2wd with the long slipjoint tailhousing. This was an early 95 trans and I could tell because it had steel spacers vs. later teflon (as per 95 dodge shop manual). Has the early shift cover design.

I bought a bunch of tools for this job like the HF bearing splitter. There were a few tough snap ring operations and I found this wilde tool g705-b duck bill snapring plier worked well. I actually put some cheater pipe on it for the big snap ring, then used a second pliers to keep it going on straight.
131289


For better intermediate shaft to the divorced np205 I put in the Chevy 2wd tailhousing and 1350 dampener yoke. I put in the Chevy 20.25" 2wd shaft and new mainshaft/countershaft 5th gears. I replaced all the struts and springs and it seems to shift more crisply.

131288


I was trying to figure out to get the 5th bear and then speedometer spacer/output bearing race pressed onto the mainshaft since those two are a press fit and I didn't want to crunch up the bearings in the case. I'm green at this stuff and I don't know what I can get away with so I follow the dang manuals to the T not knowing any better. I tried the oven trick on 5th/output spacer, heating the oven to 250 for maybe 20 minutes. I was all set with the input shaft off, end of the mainshaft supported on a block, ready to persuade them on but after the oven they simply dropped right and completely on. This version doesn't have the 5th gear problem because the yoke presses onto the spacer which presses onto the 5th gear.

131290


I wasn't completely sold on how 5th syncro gear is held onto the countershaft with that thin snap ring. I read on torque king's website that 5th synchro gear is a loose fit onto the countershaft and bought the snapring from them because the allstate one was the wider one. I think the NV is basically an old design constant mesh transmission with 5th gear added on as an afterthought.

I went slow and lubed stuff up with the redline mt-85. I got the shim kits and got the counter and main shafts set at about .0025" play which is what many have been recommending as the specs say .002-.006 or something.

I put the 1-3/8" input shaft and housing on because the old input was shot. There was a bunch of paint on the input housing so I lacquer thinnered and wire wheeled most of it off.

Shifts good through all the gears at this point but too early to tell how it'll run in the truck. Going to bag it, move it out to the garage, and store it. Everyone lifting this kindof thing with their legs like in a squat or deadlift, not their back? I'm usually all about using mechanical advantage like hoists and lifts.
Sam
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Snuggletough, Yo you have a part number for the dodge pistons? On the 6bt vs 4bt thing, you have the experience to know what works. I suppose since this would be the first diesel 4x4 I've owned I could set my expectations accordingly with the 4bt having known no other. If I was driving a dodge or powerstroke around all the time I'd probably be thinking different. I tow barely at all. I believe I have realistic expectations with the way this will work.

The only way I'll learn if the turned up but reliable 4cyl is going to work is to find out myself, which is probably the more expensive route if it sucked and I had to go with the 6cyl. Worst case scenario it's lacking, pull the 4cyl, sell it, and plug in a 6cyl into the dodge setup I have going on from the adapter plate on back.

Main thing I'm held up on 6bt now is all the fab work to get the condenser/IC/radiator/hoodlatch/fans/hoses in front of a 6bt in this engine compartment. I could do the fab work but it takes me friggin forever. That and I don't want to spend the money/time for a d60 front for the weight and redoing suspensions for the 6bt and finding a heavier rear end and axles. And mileage. I would say if time and money were no object I'd go 6 cyl.

This sounds stupid of me to justify not going that route and I realize 6bt into a 67-77 is most common. I'm in a vacuum on this stuff but there seem to be a fair amount of guys out there that seem to have successfully done 4bt's into 3/4 (and higher) ton vintage ford trucks. I know I can't trust everything I read on the internets but these have at least shown me it can be done and not be a waste of time underpowered. Here's a few bump and dentside I've looked into. Let me know if you guys know of any more 4bt (or 6bt) ford builds I should check out. I get alot of ideas I put down in my notebook reading other guy's projects.

on Youtube:
4bt: MrBigKRob
4bt: CE Smith
4bt: Rusty Junk Exhibition
Brandon8968ford (6bt but with chevy short tailhousing nv4500)

Forum Builds:
4bt: Kladd’s yet another bumpside f250 4x4 build
4bt: MrBigKRob 71 F250 4BT Cummins Work Horse: Just doing a little work - The FORDification.com Forums
Bessy turns oil burner on FTE (6bt but NV4500)
eggman918
averagef250

80’s F350 (this is a good no-nonsense one, puts a 4bt in a f350, everyone says he should put a 6bt in)
4bt 1972redneck Uh-Oh! I Just Bought A Cummins... - Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums

VE engines used both 145 and 155 pistons.

A good choice for pistons is the 89-91 Dodge piston with the upper ring lands relieved.

I think I've mentioned before I have done both 4BT's and 12 valves into Bumpside 4x4's. IMO, the only advantage the 4BT has is fuel economy. You can't possibly beat them for that.

The 12 valve is 1/4 the price to do, fits better and makes great power mildly tuned. 4BT power is abysmal stock, but turned up to 150+ HP they're plenty peppy. Main difference is how that power is made. 4BT will spend almost all of it's time above 2000 RPM. 6BT can set you back in the seat when you punch it in 5th at 35 MPH. 4BT has nowhere near the non-boost torque so driveability suffers. Granted, I have put 100's of thousands of miles in the driver's seat of 4BT powered rigs and I have devolved to choose power and path of least resistance over economy and complexity.

My favorite 4BT swapped rig was an 87 F-150 SWB 4x4 with M5R2 I built. Everything fit and worked like it was made for each other. It was light enough to be quick with the 4BT.
Milan65, thanks for the information on your water to air. It appears as though there's a certain amount of complexity involved in getting the extra cooling system in there. Are you using the standard intake cover and am I not seeing yours having that air-water intake part? Also, Did you use a high-mount AC bracket?
Thanks again

Not sure if this will help or not, but this is Frozen Boost water aftercooler setup on my 1995 Bronco. That wrapped "thing" in the middle is their type 10 watercooler. It's wrapped in R-6 insulation and foil to reflect the heat from engine and exhaust manifold below it (behind the a/c compressor). Water to Air Intercoolers
Then there are 1/2" heater hoses going down to Bosh Cobra 12V water pump installed on the plastic inner fender. Water to Air Pump 0392022002 and from there down to heat exchanger type 118 Air to Water Radiator. That exchanger has 3-12V fans on the manual switch in cabin.
And there's a filler neck to fill it with coolant of course. It is pretty much separate cooling system. The hear exchanger is on angle below main radiator. I can send you pixs if interested. There are gauges to monitor air temp before and after water cooler to monitor the efficiency of the system. Based on this calculator intercooler efficiency calculator - racingcalcs the efficiency is on average 60-75%. If it too hot outside (in Las Vegas) like right now the efficiency drops. View attachment 131281
 

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FWIW at least to ME it was the weight that tipped the scales towards the 4BT not the issues with stuffing it into the Bump's engine bay.
As I sit now I'm carrying ~ 4.500# on the front axle that is the 4BT's added weight the Crewcab and winch/bumper...For me keeping weight off the nose was worth it.
The 4BT is "easily" able to fill the shoes of the 6BT in stock trim, now there will be a increase in cost of the engine build and I'm guessing that I will not get as long of a service life from the 4 but I can't yet speak to that I can say that with the compounds once I got the charge air system to hold 40psi in the summer heat the 4BT has acted just as a Cummins should.
The passenger side of the engine bay gets really crowded really fast and I ended up making new inner fenders to add some volume, a plus with the 4 is that you can get it to sit pretty low and well back helping with CG and front/rear weight distribution. As my rig sits now it's 55/45 front to rear unloaded and 50/50 with a 3/4 ton in the bed.

One other thought having driven my rig for oved 30 years most with a well built 390 optimized for towing the 4BT at the 200 tune was able to out work the 390 it replaced and I would add that the 4 was well beyond the Bump's design limitations where GVW and CGVW are concerned....$.02
 

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Snuggletough, Yo you have a part number for the dodge pistons? On the 6bt vs 4bt thing, you have the experience to know what works. I suppose since this would be the first diesel 4x4 I've owned I could set my expectations accordingly with the 4bt having known no other. If I was driving a dodge or powerstroke around all the time I'd probably be thinking different. I tow barely at all. I believe I have realistic expectations with the way this will work.

The only way I'll learn if the turned up but reliable 4cyl is going to work is to find out myself, which is probably the more expensive route if it sucked and I had to go with the 6cyl. Worst case scenario it's lacking, pull the 4cyl, sell it, and plug in a 6cyl into the dodge setup I have going on from the adapter plate on back.

Main thing I'm held up on 6bt now is all the fab work to get the condenser/IC/radiator/hoodlatch/fans/hoses in front of a 6bt in this engine compartment. I could do the fab work but it takes me friggin forever. That and I don't want to spend the money/time for a d60 front for the weight and redoing suspensions for the 6bt and finding a heavier rear end and axles. And mileage. I would say if time and money were no object I'd go 6 cyl.

This sounds stupid of me to justify not going that route and I realize 6bt into a 67-77 is most common. I'm in a vacuum on this stuff but there seem to be a fair amount of guys out there that seem to have successfully done 4bt's into 3/4 (and higher) ton vintage ford trucks. I know I can't trust everything I read on the internets but these have at least shown me it can be done and not be a waste of time underpowered. Here's a few bump and dentside I've looked into. Let me know if you guys know of any more 4bt (or 6bt) ford builds I should check out. I get alot of ideas I put down in my notebook reading other guy's projects.

on Youtube:
4bt: MrBigKRob
4bt: CE Smith
4bt: Rusty Junk Exhibition
Brandon8968ford (6bt but with chevy short tailhousing nv4500)

Forum Builds:
4bt: Kladd’s yet another bumpside f250 4x4 build
4bt: MrBigKRob 71 F250 4BT Cummins Work Horse: Just doing a little work - The FORDification.com Forums
Bessy turns oil burner on FTE (6bt but NV4500)
eggman918
averagef250

80’s F350 (this is a good no-nonsense one, puts a 4bt in a f350, everyone says he should put a 6bt in)
4bt 1972redneck Uh-Oh! I Just Bought A Cummins... - Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums



Milan65, thanks for the information on your water to air. It appears as though there's a certain amount of complexity involved in getting the extra cooling system in there. Are you using the standard intake cover and am I not seeing yours having that air-water intake part? Also, Did you use a high-mount AC bracket?
Thanks again
There's zero complexity for air to air system. Water to air system is complex. The system efficiency and subsequent engine power enhancement is the key. As for the air intake this is what it's used:
131302

Air compressor mount is in house fabrication, but generally the high-mount bracket will do the same job.
Let me know if you want more info/pictures. Milan
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Russ, thanks for the link. Were all those vac/ps units the same? I’ve looked at two, one on a 6 the other on a 4. Both had Wabco 414 001 0126.

There’s a nos on ebay, I figure after core cost and vac rebuild kit and new Saginaw box (which sounds hard to pinpoint a source), it could get into a good bit of money, and then the brackets.
Sam

This vacuum/PS unit must be supported. Here is a link to my pictures of the home made bracket Scroll down to Post #4:


Russ
 

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Russ, thanks for the link. Were all those vac/ps units the same? I’ve looked at two, one on a 6 the other on a 4. Both had Wabco 414 001 0126.

There’s a nos on ebay, I figure after core cost and vac rebuild kit and new Saginaw box (which sounds hard to pinpoint a source), it could get into a good bit of money, and then the brackets.
Sam
My 4bt came out of a Ford/Grumman bread van - no power steering and no power brakes - 4 speed manual brakes. My vac/ps pump unit was sourced from a 6bt Dodge (found it laying in the corner of a friend's shop). When it started leaking steering fluid, I replaced it with a new Dorman branded unit (no longer available). I had no luck Googling Wabco 414 001 0126

Russ
 
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Dodge used 3 different power steering/ vacuum pump units on their trucks. The very early ones used a dual diaphragm vacuum pump arrangement. Those have a bad reputation for bearing failure and you don't want to mess with that one. The other 2 used the Wabco pumps. Those pumps came in 3 sections in 1994-1995 and 2 sections in 1996-2002. Here's a link to Gould Gear and Electric showing the proper rebuild procedure for these pumps. They make the best rebuild kits and their instructions are absolutely first rate. Dodge changed to an electric vacuum pump in later years because this mechanical type was overkill just to operate a few vacuum accessories. In the last few years the mechanical was used the trucks had hydroboost brakes so the power steering pump reservoir is different on those. This video is 1 hour but worth the watching.
 
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