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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I got the bug for a 4bt swap about 10 years ago. I wanted to swap my ’01 King Ranch F150. long story short, that didn’t work out. Years later, on a friends farm, i found (2) deutz diesels. He said i could have them if i wanted, they were just collecting dust An f4l912 and a f3l912. Around the same time, i got word that my Grandpa was ready to sell his 1994 silverado. Growing up, i always wanted this truck. I bought plane tickets and we were off to pick up my truck. A GMT400 with a turbocharged, aircooled diesel. This was going to be cool.



It wasnt pretty but, it made it from PA to FL in one piece. I was ready to swap. Things didn’t go well though, we decided to move to CO and the emissions folks out there had a hearty chuckle at my plans. “There’s no way we can have this registered in an emissions area” More can be read about that at the link below but, the short of it is, i sold everything except the truck.

https://www.4btswaps.com/forum/showthread.php?36705-Deutz-F4l912-into-a-94-z71-1500

Fast forward a few years, I’ve been in CO for a while. While on a work trip a buddy mentioned that a mutual friend down in san antonio was looking to sell a high milage, om606 (turbo) w210, at a pretty tempting price. From my previous conversations with my buddies down at colorado emissions land, I knew I could swap this engine and make it road-legal. It just so happens that the 606 is capable of amazing power output (for a little 3.0L). Stock bottom ends are known to make 6-700hp .

Well, i bought it. The car made the 1k mile trip from San Antonio to Loveland without a hiccup. 275k miles on the clock, it didn’t burn any oil and averaged 32mpg cruising 70-80mph. These 606’s are tough.





Out came the goods. I kept most of the wiring harness and sensors. I wanted to make sure i had everything i could possibly need. The rest was sold off. I just about broke even on this engine. I sold a ton of parts on ebay.



Found a parts truck nearby with an nv4500 and diesel fuel tank/filler nozzle, pedals, transfer case, etc! Again, the 606 has a lot of potential. Not only do I like shifting gears, i need the entire drivetrain to be able to handle anything the 606 can throw at it. Ive blown up way too many 4l60e’s in my day and i’m not a fan of the 4l80e.


Intake valves were pretty sooty. I cleaned out the bores in the head and sent the intake manifold off for cleaning.


I thought my timing chain has excesssive stretch so, I tore down the front of the engine and replaced the chain, tensioner, and guides. Joke’s on me. After getting everything back together, I realized that i was measuring stretch incorrectly. No stretch. Oh well, peace of mind.


Replaced fuel line clips, fuel return lines, broken/missing PCV components, and painted the valve cover.


Another advantage to the om606. It’s a gorgeous engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Out came the 200hp/300tq/13mpg paperweight.


I was able to offload the entire drivetrain for $1k. I was surprised but, there’s something to be said for a setup that you can run and drive before buying. Everyone’s had “that guy” tell them: “it ran fine when i pulled it!(10 years prior)”.


I should probably take a minute here to address LS swaps. The first thing a gmt400 fanboy says when they see this swap is “cool, i guess, probably slow though, should have swapped an LS”.

I’m the first person to tell a supra, 996 911, mazda rx7, nissan 240, [enter purist car here], owner that they should do an LS swap. Life’s too short to be a purist. LS engines are awesome, especially boosted. That being said, find me an LS that makes +450 ft/lbs of torque while still getting +20mpg and making sweet, sweet turbocharged inline 6 sounds. Yeah, it doesn’t exist. When it comes to engine swaps, chevy truck guys can be some of the biggest purists out there.

Anyway, rant over, back to superior power plants.
I milled/ welded a fitting to adapt the chevy oil pressure sensor to the merc filter housing. I want all of the factory gauges to work as intended. There’s something about a swap that looks like it could have been a factory option.


Re-tapping the om606 coolant bung for the chevy sensor.


At this point i was ready to get the engine mounted. I couldn’t successfully do that without my engine and trans mounted together. I searched high and low for options here. Bob Bendsten had an adapter but, due to some unknown reason, he took his merc->GM manual adapter off the market. The only other option was to make my own. After some conversations with Bob and some mechanical engineers that I work with, I decided to wait for Bob’s new-and-improved kit. He did say that the bellhouding adapter would be the same, a 1” thick aluminum adapter. The parts subject to change would be the internal rotating assembly. So, I went ahead and ordered the bellhousing adapter.




It’s in!


Fitment:
Hood clearance is great
alternator and AC compressor are really close to the frame and/or steering box
There’s no way the front sump oil pan will fit (om648 rear sump pan/pump swap required)
Driveline angle may be affected by tilting the engine “up” to clear the alt/AC comp
Vacuum booster is contacting the intake manifold, either “trim” the booster or swap for hydroboost
The oil filter housing sits just beneath the windshield wiper motor. WW motor may need to be removed for oil changed

Otherwise… not bad! Although the om606 should be significantly longer, the accessories sit almost flush with the front of the engine. On the 350 v8, all of the accessories sat out off the front of the engine, increasing the overall length of the assembly. Fully dressed, the 606 isn’t very much longer than the v8.



Even with the rear sump pan, i still had some fitment issues. This meant chopping up my fancy new oil pan. Oh well.

 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Motor mount time!


Using some leftover steel, 1st gen dodge v8 (the 606 is nowhere near the weight of a cummins) and the Bridgeport at work, i pieced these together:



In on it’s own mounts!



You may have seen on the previous threads… this truck has some serious rust issues. I’ve decided to replace the inner fenders, outer fenders, and core support while I’m in there. The truck will be ugly for a while , and I’ll now have to do a full respray at some point but, it needed to happen.



As much as i wanted to cheap out and run the stock turbo, I only wanted to build intake and exhaust piping once. After a bunch of research, the HE221w looked like the one to have. I’ve got enough variables on this engine so, i decided to buy one new from holset. I ported the manifold outlet to match a t25 flange and welded everything up. This was a great fit.




Manual vs EDC. Earlier on in the swap, i bought a 5.5mm manual pump. These are only good for around 180hp. The stock 6mm edc pump is said to be good for 300. The cost to get a manual 7.5mm pump built is a little over 1k. The price for baldur’s DSL1 standalone ECU is around 600. With my current goals, the EDC/DSL1 made sense financially and technologically. Logging, variable vane turbo control, active boost control for wastegate turbos, meth injection control, multiple maps (flip a switch to go from a clean-burning MPG-focused map to a full-power map), the list goes on. I can’t speak highly enough of Baldur and his product. Top notch product and top notch service. If i ever go 7.5mm pump, i’ll absolutely keep it an EDC.



Wiring! Although this seems to be a daunting task for some, it’s really not that bad, especially on a truck of this age. There’s very little communication between the truck and engine so, things are kept separate for the most part. Engine wiring can be done with Baldur’s DSL1 manual, chassis wiring can be cleaned up/grafted in using factory manuals.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Hey Guys,

So, as some of you know, my last build thread has magically disappeared. I’ve reached out to admins a few times but, have yet to hear anything back. For now, I’ll start fresh where I left off. Maybe at some time in the future I’ll backfill some of my previous posts.

Anyway, I think the last time I posted I had just purchased this VW TDI. It’s been a good car but needed some maint (clutch, flywheel, pressure plate, timing belt, cam gaskets, and a whole bunch of other stuff). In the same timeframe my om642 powered jeep started having some transmission issues. Luckily it ended up being electronic but, the valve body had to come out. In the same timeframe the coolant bottle on the 996 started leaking which requires the engine to be lowered for replacement. When it rains it pours.




So that took up a decent amount of my spare time. After that I was able to get back on the swap. I was finally able to find a set of snap ring pliers beefy enough to release the snap ring on the compressor housing of the he221w. Everything needed to be re-clocked to get a proper angle on the CHRA. It was also nice to get a good look at the billet compressor wheel. Purdy.




This is the 1982 millermatic 200 that I learned to weld on. A friend moved out to CO and offered to bring it out on his uhaul. I’m pretty excited about this, it’s DC only but a real tank and was rates @ ~300a.



So begins the transmission adapter fun… I received Bendsten’s new and improved om60x -> GM Manual adapter kit. It was not cheap but, includes a new Flywheel (modified to fit the Mercedes crank pattern), friction disk, and pressure plate. I’m still not entirely sure what all the clutch/FW kit is comprised of but, it’s some sort of mix between different setups. I’m still unsure of what transmission he designed this specifically for. It’s a 10-spline input shaft so, not a t56. He also, initially, wanted to sell me a custom bellhousing, which we decided I didn’t need (already had mine from the gas ’95 donor truck)

 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Now that the adapter is done… I can confidently start cutting this truck up for a manual swap.

Cutting/drilling the 1” trans spacer I need to raise the rear of the trans (this helps me maintain the proper pinion angles)



I realized halfway through my clutch pedal install that the slave cylinder doesn’t match. Oops. The 94 has a circular hole for the master cylinder, the 96 pedal has a square slot that the MC rotates 45* and “locks” into place. Totally different but, I was bound and determined to make this setup work.

If you’re extra interested… more details are outlined here, on a website that likely doesn’t let randomly deleted threads go unaided ;)





I used a die grinder to open that “square” into a circle-like-shape until the MC could fit through. I ground off the mounting studs & mount, and transferred the firewall holes into the pedal bracket. 5/16x18 hardware will sandwich it all together.




This truck, being an auto, doesn’t have the upper clutch pedal mount bracket.


The solution to that is: find one in a junkyard, remove the dash, cut the bracket out, remove your dash, install (weld) it into your truck, then reinstall your dash. Guess what I won’t be doing.

Instead. I’m using a .250” aluminum plate sandwiched between the top of the pedal bracket and the “ceiling”(which is actually the rain tray on the “other side”). I’ll weld a large bolt/washer to hang below the raintray (and large hole in the pedal bracket pictured below) and secure the pedal bracket. Kind of hard to explain but, it’ll make sense once it’s all done.

Small pilot hole drilled for upper pedal bracket
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Cleaned up the gauges-with-tachometer, swapped odometers, and installed


Marked all of my “interference” points. I may end up having to convert to hydroboost to clear my brake booster.


Fingers crossed, this is the last time the engine and trans combo will have to come out…





After months of searching I was finally able to track down a 648 oil pump.


I needed a little more clearance in the oil pan, it also made sense to “square” this area up for easier welding/fabrication of the new sideplates.


With the new welder I was able to finish up the motor mounts



 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Time to get this trans and motor mated together.



Both adapters installed. The crank adapter is sandwiched between the OE flexplate and new flywheel. Utilizes a factory small block pilot bushing…






So, right about here’s where things started to get interesting. I couldn’t close this gap between the trans and BH spacer. This being a new design, I knew better than to force it with bellhousing bolts


I took everything apart and my fears were confirmed… You can see where the input shaft was pressing up against the pilot bushing. It had even further-recesed the bushing a bit.



Not knowing whether or not this was “as designed” I pressed the bushing in ~.250 and marked the chamfered edge of crank adapter with a sharpie. This would let me know if the input shaft is too far in and actuall contacting the crank adapter…

Yup.



I called bendsten the following Monday, we both agreed that the input shaft and adapter need about 3/8” of extra clearance. My suggestion was to remove it from the crank adapter, he disagreed and sent me a 3/8” bellhousing “spacer” instead



Here’s my beef(s) with this solution:
1. Now my drivetrain is 3/8” longer. I’ve already welded up my motor mounts at this point so, those aren’t moving. That means the trans needs to move back. If I have to shorten driveshafts (the nv4500 is already a tad longer than the 4l60), this solution becomes quite a bit more expensive.
2. Although no one will ever see this, it’s not the most aesthetically pleasing
3. I had to modify the spacer anyway to fit my slave cylinder




So… this is where I’m at with everything. I’ve been in south carolina, germany, and san antonio over the past few months so, i havent made nearly as much progress as i’d like. As soon as i get back though, i’ve got plenty of work to do.
 

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Thank you for the updates! Not sure why the mods caint find your old thread. Hope that spacer doesn't make you have to modify the driveshafts. That would up the cost and headache.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
yeah, if the driveshafts "need" to be modified, I'll pull the spacers apart, take the crank adapter to a local machine shop and have them remove 3/8" off the back side. That'll (internally) be the same solution, without the added overall length. I just want to make sure that current internal spacing works before making permanent modifications to the machined parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Just a short update:

An unconventional way to cut carpet for a manual swap but, it worked. I had the shifter location sharpie'd underneath the trans tunnel. I drilled some small holes and ran some screws up through the carpet so, i'd know where to cut. It's a pretty haggard way of doing things but, it worked... and the final product looks alright.







I've converted the truck to hydroboost. You guys may remember from an earlier post, i had interference issues with the vacuum brake booster. This was a good excuse to make the swap. I found a booster and pedal assembly in a local junkyard for CHEAP (~$80 for pedal, lines, master cyl, and booster).



While in there, i finished the install of the clutch pedal assembly. aside from figuring out what to do with the steering column/automatic shifter, the manual "swap" portion of this build is done.


Drilled and tapped the injection pump plug for a proximity sensor. this will allow me to read/log ignition timing through Baldur's ECU.


Gutted the vacuum pump and welded up the output barb. the gmt400 trucks only use vacuum for brake boost and the he221w uses a positive pressure wastegate actuator. I no longer have any need for vacuum. This could have been done a lot cleaner by machining a block off plate with the same bolt pattern as the pump but, i'm behind schedule and have way too many other time-consuming things to get done.


The oil pan is in from my buddy's welding shop and it looks great. luckily, we were able to mod the pan without affecting the pickup tube location, it all fits.


last weekend i devoted some time to removing the driver fender, and cleaning the firewall. the firewall ended up looking like hot garbage after a clean so, i ended up painting it... I wasn't planning on doing this but, i'm happy with the result.

 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
This next bit is part of this build that i’m not particularly proud of but, whatever. it's not pretty but, it should work.

After getting the engine/trans/clutch/etc back together for the hundredth time, I realized that the factory throwout bearing was nowhere “reaching” the pressure plate springs… after a phone call or two, it was apparent that i’m on my own for this part so, i started measuring.

Here’s a comparison of the who pressure plates



As you can see, the old chevy pressure plate springs stick out much further than the more “compact” Ford pressure plate springs. The difference in spring “location” is ~1.1. It’s not perfect but, i figured if i can space everything (ball stud, fork, slave cyl) out 1”, this just might work.

First, I cut the fork ball in half and welded in a hollow (to allow for grease to pass through) spacer.


cut/punched the studs out of the slave cylinder mount. Replaced them with 1” longer bolts and welded them in place



Had some old .5” thick, 1”OD spacers laying around from an old project. Perfect for spacing out the slave mount plate.


I also drilled/tapped the back of the bellhousing for an “adjustable fork stop”. Previously, the fork would bottom out on the bellhousing itself. This should ensure that the fork and TOB do not overtravel.




All put together. My only fear here is that the TOB can potentially slide off the sleeve that sits around the input shaft. We’ll see what happens.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
All back together.



Trying to get everything (t-case,trans,eng) in assembled was a horrible idea. Next time, i’ll remove the t case. Either way, it’s in!


Oil drain and feed lines ran. I need to revisit the feed line at some point. I need some sort of mount that keeps it away from touching the exhaust.



Oil pan fitment is perfect.


Clutch pedal feel is great. No binds or goofy pedal movement. Even with the pedal to the floor, i can’t feel any indication that the throw out bearing is coming off of the input shaft sleeve. And if it is, it’s retracting right back over the sleeve with no issues,


For the most part, the shifter lines right up in the factory location. It’s still a little too high though. I’m going to mill .25” off my trans mount spacer. This will further throw off my driveline angle and i may have to shim the rear axle but, ATM, the nv4500 is contacting the trans tunnel. Too high.


I’m really hoping to get this thing fired up this week.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Holy crap. I didn't know those existed. Got a part number? If this ever comes apart, it may be worth swapping.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Whelp. it's only running on 5 cylinders but, it's alive. it even moves! my crazy throw out bearing assembly looks like it might do the trick. I'm pumped.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/jswW1XDdnsnTdQtc9



hoping to get the core support and radiator in this weekend. This'll allow me to run this thing for extended periods of time and troubleshoot cylinder #1 (i think itls just a piece of junk sitting in the intake valve from when i cleaned them. we'll see.
 

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Holy crap. I didn't know those existed. Got a part number? If this ever comes apart, it may be worth swapping.
Here are a few links to the long TB. there is actually a longer one out there but I havent seen it in years. I used the long one in my monte carlo SS 6 speed swap. worked perfect.

https://www.classicparts.com/Clutch-Parts/products/430/

GM Part # 908092


Great job getting it running. I am hunting for a 606 for my next swap. Your thread is great inspiration.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Late nights and lots of fabrication. It’s been a productive couple of weeks. I'll cover the core support first:




Intercooler and piping came in. After speaking with an LS turbo swap guy, it sounded this like 32” intercooler would be a direct fit. I ordered one (and a 2.5” intercooler piping kit). When it arrived, it was pretty obvious that this would not be as simple as i was led to believe. After some more back and forth, i found out that turbo LS guy was not running A/C and was utilizing the narrow (28”?) radiator. I’m keeping my A/C and modifying my replacement (not-rusty) core support to fit my 34” rad. This means the IC piping will have to reach further out (around the radiator) and i’ll have to modify the other heat exchangers (ac condenser and power steering cooler) to fit the massive Intercooler.

First, I widened the Rad opening for the 34” IC and made/modified new brackets for the AC condenser. The condenser is moved back, right in front of the rad. There's now only about 1/8" in between the rad and condenser. A tight fit but, they don't touch. This also required removing the factory support crossbars. oh well. This also meant that the connections for the Condenser had to be "adjusted" to reach out to their near-factory location, in front of the core support. I heated them with a torch and did my best to bend them without any kinks.






next up was modifying the horn & hood latch bracket to make room for the IC. I may need to reinforce this bracket eventually, we'll see how sturdy it is once the hood's back on.




Hole saw time. I cut 3" clearance holes for the IC piping. Unfortunately, I had no choice but to hack through the two main vertical supports. i'm sure i lost some rigidity here but, any further out and the clearance holes would have come too close to the fenders and lower turn signal lights. This was a massife pain to cut as my hole saw wasnt "deep" enough to reach through the entire support. I had to cut each side individually, then finish everything up with a cutoff wheel and air saw.






The Intercooler was mounted by drilling two holes through the top of the core support. It's hung by two pieces of m8 all-thread and supported on the bottom by one of the (modified) original core support tube x-members.

Oil Cooler: I tried fitting the original cooler but, there was really no graceful way to get it into the core support. I bought Yoshifab's Merc-10an adapters and ordered an aftermarket cooler w/ 10an lines. I welded two slotted tabs to the core support for a little bit of adjustability. Again, about 1/8" in front of the intercooler. it's a tight fit but, it all goes behind the front grill without any modification (aside from the turn signal light buckets... i may run into issues with those later).


 

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Discussion Starter #19
Radiator/ heater core hoses:
Heater core hoses are a pain on the om606. the supply line pops out on the back of the head, on the intake side of the motor. The return side lives next to the water pump housing, on the exhaust side. This meant I needed to fab up a pipe that reaches behind the engine and around to the heater core / firewall ports on the passenger side of the truck.




I was able to reuse the factory mercedes rad hoses with some mods. The in/out fittings on the merc and GM radiators are the same size. I found a 1 3/8" pipe at the local hardware store to lengthen the upper hose. the lower hose stretched to fit. I probably need to lengthen the lower hose as well at some point.



Power Steering and Hydroboost:
I was able to pull most of the hoses I needed from the parts truck that the hydroboost came from. I went to a local hose shop for the mercedes power steering -> hydroboost hose. After hacking up the core support, I can no longer fit the factory PS cooler in place. Instead, I'm using the GM (internal to the radiator) oil cooler. I cut / fab'd up some connections and topped off the system. I still need to bench bleed the master cylinder but, it looks like the routing here will work.



Intercooler Piping:
I'm running 2.5" intercooler piping from a universal e-bay kit. For the hot side, the pipe has to reach up and over the top of the turbo (via a custom he221w -> 2.5” adapter). unless I modify the compressor housing, there's no great way to clock the comp wheel so that the outlet faces down. I modified the battery bracket to allow the pipe to route underneath. On the cold side, I really wanted to be able to re-use the factor EGR housing for emissions reasons. I'll have to revisit that at a later date as, there's not a ton of extra room to route a pipe into the EGR housing. I've had a flange machined and welded on a pipe to bypass the housing.




Exhaust:
This was fun, and something I had looked forward to for a while. I ordered some polished 3” 304 stainless tubing. I used pie/lobster cuts to route the v-band turbo outlet down, around the frame, and to my old 3” exhaust. After hearing it run, it’s a little on the quiet side. One of the great things about the om606 is the sound so, I may need to “fix” this in the future. I tacked everything and took the final fitted piece to a friend who’s a professional. Backpurged and all, the final product looks really good.






Cams:
I had the truck idling in the driveway (still only on 5 cylinders) for about 30 minutes. I even drove it around the cul-de-sac once. I had power steering (still need to fully bleed the system) and coolant circulating through the radiator. Woohoo! Then this happened:



More on that expensive mistake later.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Camshaft Failure:

If we were able to see my old posts regarding timing chain replacement (still bitter about that, if you couldn’t tell), we’d never see a picture with the 3 cam sprocket bolts installed…

That’d be because I never installed them. The 606 ran for a grand total of about 35 minutes with the cam sprocket only held in palce by it’s locating pin... not bad! The sprocket eventually fell off, the cams stopped motion, while the bottom end kept turning. This caused piston #1 to meet and greet with all 4 valves in cylinder 1. The outcome?

A broken intake cam (in two places)
Spun drive gear on the exhaust cam
2 dented tappets/lifters
2 bent exhaust valves
2 bent intake valves

This also means the head had to come off to remove valves, which means a new head gasket and bolts are in order.

Not a cheap mistake. All replacement parts are on order and I’m still gunning to have this thing road by the end of the year. The good news is, the top end was no match for the ~700hp-capable om606 turbo rods. At TDC cylinders 1 and 6 are at exactly the same height. No bent rods. Phew. That’s extra good news as this engine has no blowby or oil consumption. It even has factory crosshatching at 275k miles. If this thing ever bends a rod I want it to be because It’s making 5-600ft/lbs at 2kRPM. The om606 is an amazing engine… if you put all of the parts back in it.






 
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