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Putting a 4bt with VE pump into a 2000 3/4 ton Dodge chassis for my 1950 Flat Fender Power Wagon. Been thinking of replacing the pipe from the Turbo to the intake with a barrel style air to water intercooler. They're not too expensive, it would be a fairly easy to setup and I'm thinking it would be better than no intercooler at all. It's a base engine and I'm not looking for any major power gains from it. If I do install it should I supply water to it from a port by the top of the engine where it's heading to the radiator or from the bottom where it's coming back from the engine. TIA
 

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Like the guys are saying, a water aftercooler is more efficient using a divorced cooling system. The OEM Cummins units used engine coolant but were only adding 15 HP to the engine. If you do that type system there were specific ports on the engine used for that purpose. Here's the diagram showing where the cold supply and return goes. Hose #1 is the cold feed coming off the block behind the water pump. The return #2 runs to a fitting in the head which is pressed in. If you do a divorced system you want the cooling radiator to be as large as you can fit without major surgery. Currently, the only regular pickups using such a system are the Ford diesels. They are running over 400 HP and the radiator is over 4 feet wide. It's bigger than the engine cooling radiator. For a circulating pump, the one from a Mustang Cobra is very popular because they had a water intercooler. On those Ford trucks they had a belt driven secondary water pump.
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No real argument with that idea. You can look up the Ford Mustang intercooler pump on the net. You'll see the OEM version and copies. Prices range from about $80 to $180. There are also some upgraded models which are a good bit more expensive. Here's one site that shows a couple versions. Intercooler Pumps
 

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I used a Bosch unit. It looks very similar to the mustang. I currently have my water/air plumbed through the radiator. It makes a difference, but I can’t say it works great. Probably needs its own rad.
 

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I got water to air after cooler installed in my Bronco. The unit is from Frozen Boost and it is using Bosh 12V pump. 1/2” radiator hose in/out. It has rather large radiator under the engine radiator with 3 - 12V fans on it on the switch. It’s a separate circuit with heat exchanger above the engine. 3” in 3” out. Also hooked up to dual temp gauge to monitor efficiency.
 

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I got water to air after cooler installed in my Bronco. The unit is from Frozen Boost and it is using Bosh 12V pump. 1/2” radiator hose in/out. It has rather large radiator under the engine radiator with 3 - 12V fans on it on the switch. It’s a separate circuit with heat exchanger above the engine. 3” in 3” out. Also hooked up to dual temp gauge to monitor efficiency.
And how does it work? Any comparison to a air to air?
 

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Comparing air to air and water to air units is kind of hard. According to all info I could lay my hands on, the water to air is the most efficient at removing heat. With that it must be engineered for the engine to achieve that goal. Must remember the one Cummins used on the 4bt was only for a 15 HP increase. When they went up another 10 HP they changed to air to air on the P7100 engines. Now the same 130 HP engine with the P3000 pump got water to air. Of course, the marine 4bt's were all water to air but there you had unlimited cold water. Cummins had 2 different models of their air water to air unit and not sure how they compare in efficiency. The main issue has always been cost. Below are photos of the 2 styles of 4bt units and one marine type. The first one you can buy for around $250, the second one is around $350, and the marine one is $1695. That's just for the bare unit. When you add the circulating pump, radiator , and plumbing it gets kind of costly. One I thought was nuts is the marine unit. The install kit for that one which is just plumbing and brackets is $2295. Those pipes must be made of gold. LOL.
 

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The water/air heat exchangers can be quite efficient and that makes them quite compact. But that's only one part of the system. You need another water-air exchanger to take the heat back out and it's the combined result of both that matter.

Overall I don't think anything can beat a full frontal air/air exchanger.
 
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