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Can't help you much more, you are building a motorized sound system - I build trucks...

My 1962 Volvo has a voltmeter in the dash (all aftermarket and/or home brew). The charge lamp is under the hood. A proper value resistor can be substituted for the charge lamp - The info is out there somewhere on the internet.
 

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It's a bit of an oddball, but have a look at the 17si alts that were used on the CUCV's and other medium-high amp demand vehicles. Some of the 17's have 24VDC regulators and others have 12VDC regulators. The pivot boss fits where a 10/12si will fit, but the single ear is a bit further out so some adjustment of that bracket will be required.

As a rule I stay away from outer limit hopped alternators and prefer to fit one that is stock or nearly stock output that meets the needs. Alternators at the outer limits of the what the design can handle are expensive, short lived, and temperamental beasts.
 

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Why so many Amps? Do you intend to use the alternator to arc weld?

I'm a 78 year old retired electrical engineer - having trouble with the need for that much power... Maybe you need to add up the amperage requirements for headlights, air conditioning, fans, audio gear, etc

Up front - I am running a stock 94 Amp Delco 12si in a 1962 Volvo - When the air conditioner is running on a hot day, 2 fans on the radiator, an electric water pump and 2 fans on a heat exchanger - And what ever power that the air conditioner requires. I do understand using the "big hammer" - The "Sledge hammer" might cause more problems that it solves...

This alternator was a direct bolt and plug in replacement for the previous Delco 10si (the 1962 Volvo originally had a generator). I bought a brand new Duralast # 7294-3N (1984 Camaro 5.0L 4BL OHV HP 8cyl) from Autozone.

As far as the "W" terminal for a tachometer, find a diesel General Motors car or truck that has a dash tachometer - then look up the alternator for the "full dress" model and verify the alternator "W" terminal and the Amperage output. AND beware, you will have to switch over your original alternator pulley. AND most likely, the signal output will indicate a wrong RPM due to the pulley ratios changing (i.e. the pulley on the gas motor will be a different diameter than the pulley on your diesel motor).

Got a $95 alternative tachometer:


It has a sender that clamps onto an injector line and senses the injector pulse. Gives a digital RPM readout and does NOT require calibration. My Tiny-Tach is now in the second truck, over 70,000 miles, never failed me. After a month or so, you will be driving by ear and will hardly ever look at the tach.

Russ
I have a tiny tach which I've had for 10 yrs in two trucks. Worked well on my 6.9 idi till I replaced it with regular tach with flywheel pickup. On the 5.9 it will lose pickup and not work when I let off on throttle for some reason. I replaced it with a speedhut which you calibrate. This is a 96 12v from a bus and it has no provision for a pickup(was on flywheelhousing) For pickup I replaced my harmonic balancer with the (94 up ?) with two notches Made a bracket added the two wire magnetic sensor from the bus. I used the tiny tach to calibrate the tach. It's an option if you need a tach pickup
 

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I have a tiny tach which I've had for 10 yrs in two trucks. Worked well on my 6.9 idi till I replaced it with regular tach with flywheel pickup. On the 5.9 it will lose pickup and not work when I let off on throttle for some reason...
The tiny-tach scenes the injection pulses on an injector line. When you let off the throttle, the engine is coasting and there are no injection pulses.[/QUOTE]
 
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I figured as much but it didn't do that on the 6.9. Thinking maybe injector pressure low, but runs well enough to suit me. More trouble than it's worth to me to pull and check. Thought of trying the transducer on the other lines to see if it made a difference but likely never will.
 

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If it's the nature of all these engines it's useless as it is constantly changing. Every time you let off the throttle. Changing gears its unreadable
 

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It's likely the governor shutting fuel off completely, whether or not thats the nature of the beast, don't know. Would help mileage and this thing gets good mileage.
 

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Well guys I am needing an alternator that will handle an electric fan a Stereo system and a CB radio I have the serpentine belt 4bt from a P30 van.
How many amps do you need? This is what I am running:





240 amps and Made in USA. What more could you ask for?

How about 12 rectifiers instead of the usual 6:



This is what the back looks like with the cover on:



The "S" terminal is the remote sense, "L" is the lamp output, and "W" is a phase output which is used for a tach. The large "-" and "+" terminals are self explanatory. The case of these alternators is not grounded internally, so the "-" terminal must be connected to ground.

Here's some literature: https://elreg.com/wp-content/uploads/pdfs/AVI160 Series Alternators Brochure.pdf and https://www.prestolite.com/literature/alts/PP1261_12V-AVI160_Series_Sell_Book.pdf.

Mine is direct mount, but a J180 hinge-type mount is also available. Since OE J180 brackets are available for the B series (see char1355's post, which is post #3 in this thread), that would be the best bet if you lack fabricating skills and/or tools. I got the direct mount because I was able to buy a pair of them for about half the price of a single new one.



Actually, both of these alternators were new, but they had been damaged in storage. The rear plastic cover was broken, and some of the stator solder terminals were bent. I priced out parts, and even if I needed to replace the rectifier it would have still been a smokin' deal. As it turned out, the rectifier assemblies were fine. I didn't even bother straightening the bent terminals. All I ended up needing were two new covers (don't remember the cost, but they were cheap) and a pair of pulleys (these alternators come without pulleys). I don't know if this was the best Ebay deal I've ever scored, but it's definitely gotta be in the top 5 :cool:




I've had this alternator on my truck for 4 years now, and I can't say enough good things about it. It runs noticeably cooler than the smaller CS-130 alternator that it replaced, and voltage output is a rock-solid 14.2V regardless of load.

Needless to say, these aren't alternators you throw away or trade in as a core on an Autozone alternator when they wear out. You either send it to a shop to be rebuilt (with OE Leece-Neville parts), or you buy the parts and do it yourself. The only parts that are likely to wear out are the bearings, slip rings, and brushes. All easy to replace. The only bad aspect of these alternators is their price. For whatever reason, the 240A units are MUCH more expensive than that 210A versions. The 210A version isn't exactly cheap, but it's a good price for what you get. The aftermarket "hi-amp" alternators that are rewound on a small frame (and only make their output with a tiny pulley and when spinning the snot out of it, and then they overheat rapidly) cost more than these, and aren't nearly as beefy, robust, and reliable. Sometimes the rewound units cost MUCH more.

If you need more than 160A but less than 200A and want something a bit more palatable price-wise, then the AC Delco 28si units (made in Mexico) is a good option. They are available in 160A, 180A, and 200A versions. They aren't as beefy as the Leece AVi160 series, but they also aren't as expensive! If 140-160A is enough, the Motorola-type alternators are worth looking at. They are common, and good remans of US-made cores are readily available. Good used ones are easy to find as well, and often for a very good price. If it's really cheap but needs new bearings, brushes, and slip rings, and you have a good automotive alt and starter rebuild shop where you live, then buying it and having it rebuilt is another option. They're old-school, but that's actually a good thing; they are a tough, proven, reliable design. Millions of class 4-8 trucks and pieces of heavy equipment have run and still run these alternators, so there is no shortage of new, used, remans, and cores out there. Just look around for a 160A version, again assuming 160A is enough for your needs. A typical series number for a 160A version is 110-555JHO. Those series are commonly called "triple nickel". The part number for a Leece Neville 110-555JHO is 8LHA2070VF. Watch out if you're shipping online as a lot as the inexpensive new ones are universally Chinese clones. I'd rather have a good remanned US-made unit vs a new Chinese one. But that's just me ;)
 

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Yes, those are serious alternators. Those are typically found on ambulances or emergency vehicles. Also expensive if you went out to buy new ones. Max, how big is the charge wire you're running and what kind of protecting circuit? 240 AMPS recommends 2 gauge wire for under 5 feet length. Fusible links seem to stop around 140 AMP but there is a CBBF Battery Fuse that goes up to 300 AMP. I looked up the A160204 which is the J180 mount 240 AMP and it's around $450 plus you need the mount, pulley, and wiring. About $600 total on the high side.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
I picked up an AC Delco CS144 140amp 4 wire on eBay from a private seller Remanded never used still in box.It will charge at 90amps @ idle and I can upgrade it to a dual rectifier at a later date. I read the 1 wire CS144 doesn’t charge as high at idle I’ll just need to buy the plug with the resistor in it.
 

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I guess you have a couple chores to do now. First find an 8 groove pulley since that one is probably either the 4, 5, or 6 groove. That one is supposed to be a 17mm bore and I found one store that has an old style 8 groove which uses a 17mm tapered insert. Here's a link to that. Part # 241276 8-Groove Alternator Pulley for GM & early Ford alternators with 17mm shaft Also found the Cummins part number for that one which is 3908560. Here's a cheap ebay listing for that one. 8 Groove Serpentine Belt Pulley Fits Cummins 12SI Delco Alternators 3908560 | eBay Of course you could always get it from Cummins for around $100. LOL. If your engine is from a P30 the bracket may be correct. If you have the old alternator you may just swap pulleys too unless you'd like a nice shiny new one.
 

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I did some research on it and it should work in stock form for now one company online sells a rear case upgrade to a dual rectifier. If I’m not mistaken this alternator is brushless and supposed to charge good at idle.
 

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There are companies that offer other size pulleys to increase idle output. Don't believe any of those came in 8 groove.
 

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I used one from here for mine, comes with a tapered sleeve that grips the shaft. On a Ford knock off alternator.
Cheers Steve
 

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How many amps do you need? This is what I am running:


240 amps and Made in USA. What more could you ask for?

The "S" terminal is the remote sense, "L" is the lamp output, and "W" is a phase output which is used for a tach. The large "-" and "+" terminals are self explanatory. The case of these alternators is not grounded internally, so the "-" terminal must be connected to ground.
After seeing this, I happened to see a 210 amp one on the bay. (60$) I got it and am making mounts currently. (This sucker is heavy) What is "remote sense"? Do I have to hook this up? The lamp is for warning light? So can I just hook up + and - and tach?
 

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Discussion Starter #39
If it’s a 4 wire you’ll have to get the plug with the resister on it or a warning bulb from what I read you can’t use an LED bulb. You’d have to post a picture of it. I don’t have the knowledge to help you yet as mine won’t be installed till after I start working on all my wiring.
 

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Yes, those are serious alternators. Those are typically found on ambulances or emergency vehicles. Also expensive if you went out to buy new ones. Max, how big is the charge wire you're running and what kind of protecting circuit? 240 AMPS recommends 2 gauge wire for under 5 feet length. Fusible links seem to stop around 140 AMP but there is a CBBF Battery Fuse that goes up to 300 AMP.
I am using AMG/MEGA style fuses. Click on this link and scroll down almost to the bottom of the page for Eaton Bussman AMG offerings, and this link for the Littelfuse MEGA versions. They are interchangeable. They are a standard stud-mount fuse, available in 80 to 500 amp sizes. Both manufacturers, as well as Bluesea and others, make mounts for them. I use the Eaton HMEG holder because I liked it better than the Littelfuse version, but they all work. I don't fuse the alternator output, just the battery supply to the rest of the vehicle. When I relocate my batteries to the back of my truck, each battery will have a 250A fuse close to the positive terminal, with just a stub cable between the battery terminal and the fuse holder (too short to touch any grounded areas). The alternator is inherently current limited, so if you have big enough cables you might get some cool arcing and such, but they wont overheat.

When you think about it, there is no practical way to fuse the alternator output. What size do you use? Anything below the alternators max output will blow if you put a large load on the system with the alternator charging (i.e. a winch with a heavy load on the top layer of cable), while any fuse larger than the alternator's output will never blow because the alternator's electronics limit the output current. The only things that need fusing are the batteries themselves. Size the fuses for the maximum output current that should ever be drawn from the batteries. That would be 250A or possibly 300A per battery for a dual battery system on a truck with a winch. Without a winch, 150-200A per battery should be fine. On a single battery system with no winch, a single 300A fuse should be plenty for the starter. In fact, 250A should be fine, but I like a little extra headroom. Obviously the cables need to be large enough to pass the fuse's rated current without much voltage drop, otherwise their insulation will go up in flames while the fuse never blows. I wouldn't use a winch on a single battery unless it's a group 31 or larger, and then you would need a 500A fuse with big-ass cable.

I am running 2ga cable everywhere. The alternator to right side battery length is about 20" or so. After that, it splits and 2ga goes off to the left side battery, where it meets a junction block. From there, a 2ga goes off to the battery and another 2ga goes to the starter. There is no fusing on any of the heavy gauge stuff. It all relies on Adel clamps preventing the cable from rubbing on anything. Not ideal, and I plan to fix that soon. I want a fuse on each battery. My system fuse is a single 150A AMG/Mega fuse, and from there a single 4ga carries current to an underhood junction block. From there, a couple branches carry current where needed, with each branch being protected with fusible link wire. I want to eventually replace the fusible links with medium current fuses.

One often overlooked thing is the sense wire from the battery to the alternator (if used). This needs to be fused at the battery. It doesn't carry any current, so a 2A fuse is plenty. If the tach output on the alt is used it needs to be fused or current limited with a resistor right at the alternator's tach output terminal.

I looked up the A160204 which is the J180 mount 240 AMP and it's around $450 plus you need the mount, pulley, and wiring. About $600 total on the high side.
Yeah, they ain't cheap if you have to pay full retail on them. OTOH, if you need it, then you need it. If you don't need it, there are less expensive, lower amp options available for sure. I wouldn't have gotten these if I had to pay full boat for 'em. I just ran across 'em and they were being offered at a very good price, so there was no downside.
 
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