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Discussion Starter #1
I have read in a couple of places that there were two "qualities" of the 7.3l built - one used in pickup trucks, vans and SUV's and another built for heavier purposes. The first is supposedly good for +-200K miles, the second for about half a million. I can't find the original page. When I search on this, I find no such information. Do you know anything about it?
 

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I've been driving one since 1989. Had a 6.9 before that. Don't know of any heavier parts on the 7.3 as far as block, crank, etc goes but it could be. The turbo models did have some different parts such as pistons and rings. If properly cared for the pickup truck engines would go a half million. My current one has 322,000 on it. One mistake some made was trying to put a turbo on the non turbo engine without changing the pistons and rings. That was pretty much a guarantee for failure.
 

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As I recall the 94 turbo block was strenghtened, as well has heavier rods and I believe wrist pins. Probably other things as well. Don't know about the ones in heavier trucks. I do recall they used a different pump on some or maybe all. It's was a inline pump such as a p pump or bosch ape as found on Mack's. I wouldn't overboost regardless of block.
 

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There are many variations of the 7.3L. The idi non- turbo are mostly the same. Then the first di turbo motors used pump- line- nozzle and were similar to the international 444 motors. The blocks were not interchangeable with the previous 7.3. Then in 98/99 they upgraded again with the hoop and piezo injectors making it a quasi common rail system. I think you could interchange blocks with the previous 7.3L but obviously the heads and everything else were totally different. Even the latest 7.3L had changes like the type of injectors used, and the metallurgical change of the connecting rods. As far as what international was doing with their 444... I don't know. I think they mirrored the injection systems but there were front dress changes that made them a little different. As far as reliability goes, obviously properly taken care of and not abused any of them can go 500k without a problem. I've never heard that the industrial motors lasting longer but they were de-rated from their Ford counterparts. I believe the internal parts are the same on all.
 

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The only ones I've had experience with are the IDI non turbo engines. There was an IDI turbo for a short while. The DI engines were the Powerstrokes and those are different animals.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
What was the first year the 7.3 had "electronic junk" on it? or has it always had some? I am looking for an f450 flatbed to use in an RV conversion. I know that there are box trucks that will give me the same utility, but I have never seen a box truck that is 4x4, unless it was a custom conversation. A large number of the flatbeds are 4x4. Some people put 6BT's in these when the 7.3 gives up the ghost but I would like to ride the wave of the 7.3 until it dies. I prefer engines without electronics - I know they don't have quite the same fuel economy but they are cheaper to fix and maintain. I would, however, like to put an allison 2xxx in the truck and some point, which requires electronics :(
 

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What was the first year the 7.3 had "electronic junk" on it? or has it always had some? :(
My understanding: from the first Powerstroke motor, the 7.3s had computer-controlled injection. That was 1994 or 1994.5 or so.

And, all of the IDIs were, basically, mechanical.

Roy
 

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Irhunter, I believe you're correct there. My shop manual shows 3 different 7.3's in 1994. There was an IDI, IDI turbo, and a DI that year. The DI would have been the electronic Power Stroke. In 1995 it only shows the DI engine.
 

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All the IDIs had rotary Stanadyne injection pumps...from the first 6.9 to the turbo 7.3. One of their few, IMHO, weak points. It seems common for guys to need pump rebuilds in the 100 to 150k range. But, no electronics there.

The first Powerstrokes ran electronically-controlled hydraulically-powered unit injectors.

I have never heard of anyone converting the DI motors to run an injection pump.

Roy
 
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