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OK guys i know i ask a lot of really weird questions but i'm sum what new do building a truck from scratch. I have a early bronco that will end up being my daily driver but the on road to off road ratio will be 90 % on 10 % off. What type of paint should i use on the axle's? I don't want the paint to hold to much heat in that the axle will over heat. I want some thing that wont chip easly or scratch. Do you guys have any good ideas?
 

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endura.... tough stuff, I used this stuff to paint an 87 blazer that was used mostly to play in the bush, but the guy wanted paint that will last... this is the stuff. Nasty stuff though, if you use it, make sure to wear an air supplied respirator. Really nice finish, single stage or base/clear.

http://www.endura.ca/

there's also POR15 great stuff also, again, nasty to spray with, very thick. Dries flat so if you want a nice finish, you must topcoat it. This stuff will STOP rust!

http://www.por15.com/prodinfo.asp?grp=1&dept=1
 

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POR15 is rediculously expensive and hard to topcoat with anything down the road.

I use urathane equipment enamal for chassis. Equipment enamel is cheap, it's made to be tough as nails and not as glossy. I use Cloverdale Clovathane myself. I have stuff that's been used hard and sat outside for a decade with it and it still shines. My trailer's painted with it. It's held up to tires burning out on it. That's good enough for me!
 

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indeed, por15 is not cheap, but it will last forever, and you should stick with a por15 topcoat if you do use it.

endura is an industrial urethane designed for the toughest applications, big rigs, heavy equipment, airplanes, etc. Will be high gloss though as will all acrylic urethanes unless you add a flattening agent.

Either way, stick with the durable acrylic urethane. If you go with an acrylic enamel, lacquer, or alkyd enamel, keep in mind it won't last. (ie. tremclad, rustoleum)

Clovathane is a good, inexpensive acrylic urethane that will give you a nice glossy finish. Don't forget to prime first!

Best of luck with the project :beer:
 

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The equipment enamel is good, but use the hardner that is optional. It will help with durability. I also like the ceramic engine enamel for axles. It is also very durable.
 

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Here is how I do all my trucks;

Blast with Black Beauty to a bright shiny steel
Coat with Pickle X-20 www.picklex20.com
PPG, MP-170 Epoxy Primer
PPG, MOA Hardened Chassis Black #93000 finish is a satin black

The resulting finish is hard, withstands chips, is durable. Everything exposed to road slop gets the PPG MOA.

Line-X is going to be a Mess. Since its textured, dirt is going to fill the texture and you will have to work on it with a brush to get clean.

Powder Coat will chip under the truck exposed to flying rocks etc.
When it chips, water starts under the powder coat and eventually it will start to rust. The rust moves along and pushes up more powder coat.

I have a Powdered Coat Buckstop www.buckstop.bix Front and Rear bumper on my CTD Ram. Its 4 years old and peeling and rusting. As soon as I get some wiggle room in building, I want to Blast off the Powder Coat and treat as mentioned above. Now, if it does get paint damage, its a easy repair.

Paul
 

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I am using Oil based Tractor Paint Enamel. Gloss Black. With the primer they also sell, it looks good enough for an axle. You just brush it on. It is on the cheaper side of everything I do. I have tried a few other brands, but nothing as expensive as POR 15 as the rocks/mud/dirt just scrape away anything that is on the axles.

Repaint is easy. Just brush on another coat. Blends fine.
 

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Here is how I do all my trucks;

Blast with Black Beauty to a bright shiny steel
Coat with Pickle X-20 www.picklex20.com
PPG, MP-170 Epoxy Primer
PPG, MOA Hardened Chassis Black #93000 finish is a satin black

The resulting finish is hard, withstands chips, is durable. Everything exposed to road slop gets the PPG MOA.
I recently coated a new Strange 12 bolt rearend for my 95 Z28 using OMNI (lower cost PPg brand) epoxy primer and OMNI black urethane. The rear was rust free as I worked on it with a cup brush for hours.

I checked the www.picklex20.com website and found the product appealling. I think I will try it when I repaint my utility trailer.

I had not heard of the MOA Hardened Chassis Black #93000. Is it urethane based? Does it require a specific hardner and reducer?
 

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I've had good luck with Hammerite paint.

Both the suspension parts on my old Toyota and my new Jeep have been painted with Hammerite and I've never had any issues.
 

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I've had good luck with Hammerite paint.

Both the suspension parts on my old Toyota and my new Jeep have been painted with Hammerite and I've never had any issues.
That is what I used to use. After about two years it will start to flake off in large patches if scratched. My Willys Pickup and my Willys Wagon both were painted frame and axles with the stuff.
 

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I recently coated a new Strange 12 bolt rearend for my 95 Z28 using OMNI (lower cost PPg brand) epoxy primer and OMNI black urethane. The rear was rust free as I worked on it with a cup brush for hours.

I checked the www.picklex20.com website and found the product appealling. I think I will try it when I repaint my utility trailer.

I had not heard of the MOA Hardened Chassis Black #93000. Is it urethane based? Does it require a specific hardner and reducer?
First, on Pickle-X 20;

I use Pickle-X 20 on every bit of blasted bare steel in my trucks. I have had my Carryall, Power Wagon and M37 sitting blasted, coated with Pickle-X 20 for over a year in my shop, prior to prime and paint with no surface rust starting on the blasted steel. I also spray/wipe a coat on all 'new' steel I buy be it sheet or dimensional stock, it stays as new, rust free. Also removes mill scale. I am sold on the product. Keep in mind, you CAN NOT prime with a self etching primer, it will destroy the Pickle X protection. You MUST use a Epoxy primer. Pickle-X 20 comes in Quart Spray Bottles or gallon Jugs. I gallon will totally cover a Pickup inside and out with some left over. 1 Gallon covered my Carryall which is about the same surface area as a Suburban. I use old Spray Nine containers to shoot the Pickle-X 20. When applied to shiny blasted steel, when dry the steel will turn a Flat Finish. If Pickle-X 20 finds any rust, when dry the surface will be a brown/yellow color....this is normal.

PPG, MOA Chassis Black, also called Frame Black # 93000 is a MOA Modified Alkyd Enamel designed for use in manufacturing and industrial applications. MOA can be applied with or without hardener. MOA is RTS, (ready to shoot) out of the can, thinning up to 10% may be done with MR Reducers. Hardener is MMA 531 Acrylic Hardener. PPG has now replaced the MMA 531 with ALK 201 hardener, same mix ratios. Recoat is before 6 hours or after 30 hours to 4 days.

Compatible Substrates among many, PPG MP-170 Epoxy Primer

Ask your PPG Supplier for P Sheet # OB26 (3/98) MOA for full use details.

Paul
 

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that chassis saver looks promising. looks like theres a distributor about 30min drive from my place. do you topcoat it?
You only have to topcoat it if you care about it changing color. The pigment is UV sensitive, so the gloss and satin black will change to charcoal overtime from being exposed to the sun. The aluminum one doesn't change much.

Keep in mind this stuff does not have much of a shelf life once you open the can, about 3 months max. So buy just enough for the job.

On another note, if I'm wanting a Epoxy Primer...PPG DP90. Nothing else!

I've attached the Psheet for MOA...talking to my PPG guy he did say that MOA is now on the discontinued products list???
 

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I use POR-15. The stuff is incredible!!! ROCK hard. I've tried other supposedly durable paints suggested by people over the years, and nothing comes close. As long as the surface is clean and has texture (surface rust, blasted, coarse sanded, etc.), it will bond extremely hard. Over a year ago I painted a little patch on our shop floor near the overhead door, right where every vehicle's tires will go over it, just to show my boss how strong it is. After several cars a dayt for a year, its still black and hasn't come off.

Jim
 

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I'm sure there are other good products out there other than the POR15 I used. Pauls trucks (Paul in NY) look first rate, and it looks like he's built enough vehicles that he has probably tried quite a few products, so the products he suggested are no doubt good.
The statement that POR15 dries to a flat finish isn;t true, not in my experience anyway. It dries glossy. They do produce a finish named "chassis black" that dries flat, but it is a topcoat for those wanting to duplicate some factory finishes on frames. The manufacturer of Por15 suggests a topcoat for surfaces that will be exposed to direct sunlight, as it is UV sensitive.
I can;t speak to the durability of other mentioned coatings as I haven't used them, but Por15 is "tough as nails". I sprayed the frame of my 72 Bronco, the complete underside of the body, and the backside of all exterior panels. The axle housings were brushed (done at a later time, and I didn't want to mess with the spray equipement) The frame I topcoated with their "Chassis Black".
 

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i am galvanizing my frame what should i paint it with?
I just went through that. Had the frame hot dipped and then painted it. You cannot paint it with an oil based paint, it will delaminate later. If you want to go the real cheap way and don't mind if it chips later use a latex house paint, Home Depot has a Behr nano paint that is supposed to be good. If you want to spend some bucks like I did go with an epoxy primer followed by a urethane top coat, it will last forever. Did this on the frame, axles, springs, etc. What ever way you go you will need to etch the galvanized to get good adhesion. Since my buddy owns a couple NAPA stores I went with Martin Senour. Degreased with Kleenz EZ, etched with Iron Etch, primed with DTM 3.5 VOC Epoxy primer followed by Crossfire HS single stage Urethane enamel black. You need a fresh air respirator system if you go this route. I'm putting the axle shafts in the front end right now, I'll have some pics in a couple days of the rolling chassis. Check out my pics on this build titled "4BT in a '90 f150" in the buildup forum.
 
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