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Discussion Starter #1
it passed! haha. I started it yesterday when it was 29F out, went to start it today and it took some cranking but it started with no block heater at 18F. Good thing to, i had to get to work and it's my DD right now... I will be getting a new block heater and a timer very soon. Not sure what else to help her start on these cold mornings.

I have no grid heater, just a nice strong battery...
 

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Same here, it was 23F this morning, and it took about 3 or 4 seconds of cranking for it to kick and run, and it was noticeably slower turning over. No half-running tho, just nothing to running on all 4. Lets me know that the compression is close to the same on all 4 holes, at least.

Usually, in warmer weather, it fires and is running after maybe 2 revolutions.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
in warm weather mine fires almost instantly.

It let out a pretty big cloud of smoke, but didn't smoke at all once it was running for a couple seconds.
 

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I wondered how mine would start this morning at 19 below. I did not test fate, my trucks stayed in the warm shop. The Ram CTD sits out side plugged in ha ha

Paul
 

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Eather??

It is about the same weather here, and I have found since the injector change m 6B does not like to start below 30 degrees.....lots of smoke and big smoke rings floating throught the neighbors yard while cranking. Plugging it in is perfect, but what if I am not at home?

Is it a cardinal sin to use a tad of either to fire it? My dad used tons of it on tractors and farm trucks, but I know alot of people frown on it. I was thinking about installing a petcock after the filter so I could juice it a tad on cold mornings if I am away or dont get it plugged in.

What are you guys thoughts?
 

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I guess if you had to.....

Buy the stuff from John Deere. It was more expensive but more pure and wasn't as harmful to engines. The wal-mart and Pyroil stuff is all garbage.
 

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Maybe you should try playing with the timing?
Timing advance would likely make it worse from what I have read....it is still stock right now. The injectors are just a little different than the ones that were in it. The old ones were 5 holers and the new ones 4.....I suspect that could be effecting the cold starting. I actually did not realize I had 5 holers untill I cleaned them up, or I would have had them rebuilt instead of getting new ones.
 

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All of the carnage and drama that I have seen blamed on using starting fluid can be directly traced to its misuse or an inferior product. It is absolutely acceptable and recommended to PROPERLY use a high quality starting fluid in a metered quantity. Do not use 100% ether (the cheap stuff on the shelf at the convenience store or discount parts store) It has little or no upper cylinder lubricant and even a little too much of it can wash the cylinders dry to the point of seizing the engine. I prefer John Deere starting fluid because of its superior lubricating properties. If you choose to use starting fluid, it is critical that any glow plugs, grid heaters, or the like be disabled as the starting fluid will flash instantly upon contact with the heat source, likely causing a window in the block, broken crank, stretched head bolts, etc. Also bear in mind that starting fluid is intended to be a STARTING AID, not fuel in a can. In other words, it is intended to promote the combustion of diesel fuel, not replace it. Running the engine on straight starting fluid is asking for trouble, so don't do it unless you're trying to start a pulling tractor. These B series Cummins engines, given enough cranking time, will start without any aid at all at very low temps if they are healthy and right, but I prefer to get the engine running as quickly as possible with a minimum of cranking, especially if it is very cold. On my rig, I use an electric setup (30 series John Deere tractor) with the nozzle pre turbo. I crank the engine for a second or two with the throttle wide open to assure the presence of fuel in the combustion chamber. Then, with the throttle at or just above idle, I resume cranking, touch (not hold) the button to inject starting fluid into the intake stream, and the engine starts instantly. This arrangement and procedure has yet to fail to produce a running engine at temps well below -20F and -50F wind chill. If it will crank, it will start. All that having been said, I still feel that the best option to assure cold weather starting is the use of a block heater, and I do use mine whenever possible. At my place of employment, however, that option is not available, so the use of starting fluid is the only contingency plan.
 

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It is about the same weather here, and I have found since the injector change m 6B does not like to start below 30 degrees.....lots of smoke and big smoke rings floating throught the neighbors yard while cranking. Plugging it in is perfect, but what if I am not at home?

Is it a cardinal sin to use a tad of either to fire it? My dad used tons of it on tractors and farm trucks, but I know alot of people frown on it. I was thinking about installing a petcock after the filter so I could juice it a tad on cold mornings if I am away or dont get it plugged in.

What are you guys thoughts?
I used to have a John Deere, JD350B Dozer. It had a place where you could screw a can of either. Then on a cold start you would push a button and a pre measured shot of either was dispensed. I dont know about cummins ?

Paul
 

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my service manual for 92 dodge doesnt recommend useing any starting aid.

The actual reason is because when the grid heaters cycle on it could ignite before it gets into the cylinder.

if you dont have grid heaters I dont see a problem with using any starting aid.

just a thought
 

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Boy, you guys don't know what cold is. Mine got a real test this morning, and again tonight. This morning it was -18 f. and my wife tried starting it, and failed. No fault of the Cummins, my original 8 year old Durango battery is junk. I put jumpers on from our Cherokee, and used a booster pack to jumper the grid heater for 20 seconds or so (I don't have the heater wired up yet) and it started right up. I let it warm up for 20 minutes while I got ready for work, and I actually had heat on the way (after a couple miles of driving...idling took the chill off the interior, but it sure wasn't warm yet). All I had hook up last night was the oil pan heater. I need to get the block heater and grid heaters wired up.

I did have a fuel issue at lunch time (just a little below zero then), which was caused by water in the fuel. Damn place I filled up at last night must have had some in it. I added Diesel 911 before I left work tonight (-10 when I left) and it was fine on the way home. Tomorrow morning is supposed to be quite cold again, so I'm just going to jumper the grid heater before trying to start it.

Overall I'm very impressed with it's cold weather manners. I'm sure once I have all of the little detailed wired up it will start in any weather.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #13
good to hear!

my main issue is the way it's wired. If it doesn't start right away the coil power turns off and the fuel solenoid turns off.... i jumped the fuel this morning and was able to start it relatively easily.

no oil pan heater for me...

tried to get a block heater, but advance said they didn't have one...i think they do, they just didn't look correctly.
 

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Wd-40

I've had success using WD-40 to start diesels. I remove the air filter and spray a little into the air intake while cranking. The propellant provides the boost for starting and the oil supplies cylinder lubrication.
 
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