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Been doing some reading on these engines. Seems to me that this could be a real quick solution to alot of problems. If this engine can meet the new Tier III emissions then that would be a hell of a start to getting it legal even though it is an off road engine. The emissions papers will carry alot of weight at the DMV and maybe even with the local legislature.

If it comes down to it, get an emissions test on the old engine and get one on the new 3.3. Take this with you and you will have a leg to stand on. To me haow could someone refuse an engine swap if it has less emiossions than the one it replaced.

With some more research, Cummins might just have a winner here. Just like the 4BT swap into the bread trucks.

Kind of makes me wonder about the Big Three. Cummins has the solution now and they can't get on the ball until 2009?


Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Did a little more research on the emissions thing and found out that a system has benn developed for the diesel that cuts NOx emissions by 90%. It in Europe now. Anybody want to guess on the chances we'll see it here?

Mike
 

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Are you talking bluetec urea system? I've been to M A N and Mercedes in Germany and seen this system on the assembly line. I've also talked with the lead Biodiesel engineer for Mercedes. He says running Bluetec they can actually improve the fuel economy of their engines. Because bluetec is capturing NOx they can increase cylinder temperatures and thus efficiency. It's a neat idea but it's an expensive system and you have another tank full of something else you have to buy.
 

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Urea is used in utility furnace applications to reduce NOx (among other places). Google "SNCR".

selective non-catalytic reduction

Urea vaporizes, breaks down to ammonia at high temp, reacts with NOx, makes N2 gas and water vapor. Also releases ammonia vapor (unreacted). FYI, urea is corrosive, particularly to carbon steel.

And yes, we all make urea every day. The stuff used in industry is synthetic, made from what else ... petroleum or nat gas!
 

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anybody know what they charge to refill with urea, just figuring they will probably try to jack the price even higher than they charge farmers. Because 46-0-0 (urea) is usually less than 50 cents a pound of actual N so about <30 cents/lb of urea, assuming the max amount they would put in at a time would be a 55lb bag, it should be cheap. Although I would assume they would make it so you have to use their "special" type of Urea. It's just so damn expensive because of the amount farmers have to put on and it is even cheaper in the US than here in Canada.
 

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Just double checked and the system is called bluetec but the urea is called AdBlue.

From a website in Europe:

"The cost of AdBlue varies depending on where and how you buy it. AdBlue is not taxed like diesel (although VAT applies), and normally costs about half of the price of diesel. In most driving conditions, the cost of AdBlue will be more than offset by savings on diesel fuel consumption."

also

"As a rough rule, average AdBlue consumption will be about 5% of diesel use. Therefore for motorway driving you will use about 1.5 litres per 100 km."

www.findadblue.com
 
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