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Discussion Starter #1
Just starting a project...4BT into my 1952 Willy's truck.

Old
Motor: F161 Hurricane
Trans: T-90 [3 speed]
T-case: Dana 20
Axles: Front - Dana 25 [5.38]
Rear - Timken clamshell [5.38]

New
Motor: 1987 Cummins 3.9L
Trans: Dodge NP435
T-case: Dodge NP205
Axles: Front - Dana 44 [4.10]
Rear - Dana 44 [4.10]

Questions:
#1 - What kind of adapter do I need to bolt up the NP435 to the Cummins? [I have the original bell housing that came with the NP435 transmission]
#2 - The 4BT I have came out of a step-van and has a T-19 4-speed transmission bolted to it now. I do not want to use the T-19. Would it be easier to adapt the T-19 bell housing to fit the NP435?

Both of these questions may have been asked and covered earlier in the forum history, and I do not want to re-hash older posts. If this subject is covered, than please say so and I will mine through the forums to find it. IMG_1909.jpg
Happy to be here and still energetic about the swap! Thanks.
 

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Here's a full page of "gearing" questions for the 4BT. The 1:1 final gearing found in the T19 and the NP435 along with the 4:10 axle ratio limits the top speed to 55 mph. That's OK for a in town truck but if you want to venture out on the open road it's going to be tiring very quickly. You want to gear the 4BT for about 2000 rpm @ 70 mph.
You'll need a transmission with a OD, NV4500, M5R2 or something similar.
 

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Did your 1987 4bt come with a flywheel and an aluminum adapter plate (flat plate, about 1 inch thick)?

If you have the adapter plate, determine what the bell housing bolt pattern is. Hint: in that year, General Motors (Chevy) were mostly automatic transmissions, the GM flywheel is hard to to find (translation: Very expensive).

My 1986 4bt was in a Ford chassis, Grumman bread truck (still using the Grumman shell as a storage shed). The bell housing pattern is "Late Windsor". I have over 70K miles on a M5R2 transmission (newer F150). It bolted up, still using the same clutch that came with the 4bt. I DID have to fabricate all the hydraulic clutch parts. And about every 3 years, remove the transmission to replace a leaking hydraulic slave cylinder.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the response. My engine did come with an attached T-19 4-speed transmission. When I pulled the transmission off, I discovered that there is an adapter plate that is bolted directly to the back of the block that is 2"thick. I do not know how to identify/determine what the bell housing pattern is. Is there a location on the housing that will have a data plate, or will it be cast into the housing somewhere? I do not have a great picture of the bell housing, but when I get onto it this weekend, I can snap a photo and throw it on here. IMG_2123.jpg IMG_2124.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ed,

I picked up a narrow front Dana 44 from underneath a late 70's Wagoneer. It measures exactly what my current axle width is now [I believe that the previous owner swapped the front axle out with a wider track] and with that Wagoneer axle, I am going to disc brakes [front and rear].
 

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That looks line a Ford Bellhousing pattern, same pattern came on my 4bt,

Google: "Ford late Windsor bellhousing bolt pattern" for more information
 

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This may or may not get you thinking and modify your plans, but I just built a T19 using a Ford bellhousing, Ford case, International gears, and Texas adapter. This lets me run a Jeep D20 behind a 302 with no aftermarket parts.

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