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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
I have a 1996 Dodge 2500 Regular Cab long bed. Under the hood is a 5.2 (318). Hopefully not for long. I have about two months of down time because I am losing my license so time is not going to affect this. I have heard a 12v will bolt right in with no conversion plates. Basically what I am asking is what will I need, weather Electrical, or drive train, and suspension. And what that's in my truck now can stay. I understand there are many threads like this for 1500's but I haven't seen any for a 2500 with a 318. Or if there is a thread somewhere some one could redirect me to that would be great.

Vin# is 1B7JF26Y2TJ101065
 

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You'll need a transmission capable of handling the Cummins 6BT torque, 47RH [not up on the numbers anymore] or NV-4500 or Getrag. There's a Cummins adapter plate needed between engine & trans far as I know, not positive. Mopar may have switched to an SAE pattern on the later trucks to save overall assembly line costs. The diesel will need way more clutch than found in a gasser manual trans, say a 13.5" instead of 9"-10", plus a roller pilot bearing.

You would want to duplicate the electronics of a mid-90's Cummins Dodge in your truck so various computers & systems function, not that hard from what I hear because Mopar looked ahead on this.

There's quite a difference in weight so you might need to beef up front springs. A 2500 will have heavier springs than a 1500 but doubt they're identical to Cummins springs. Air Lifts are great there, both front and rear.

A diesel's torque can be pretty hard on rear ends, don't know what you've got, a corporate rear or Dana or what, may be enough. Also need heavy duty U-joints like 1350's or 537x.

Diesel requires larger fuel line, at least 5/16" but you can use the current 1/4" gas line for the diesel's required return line to tank. Tank has to be cleaned of gasser rust & residues before use as diesel. Entire exhaust is different, gasser is too small, won't work. You'll need diesel motor mounts. Current radiator probably okay as diesels don't need so very much cooling. There's no vacuum in diesel engines so some systems may require a vacuum pump/power steering pump to adapt, stock on CTD trucks.

If your current engine is a Magnum they or the parts like heads & injection fetch a strong price, could recoup some expense. Look in the Tech Sticky and the FAQ Sticky for valuable info, also Build section.

Personal STRONG suggestion: Adding your considerable labor to above obvious expense, sell your truck, buy a beater CTD with fairly low miles and fix it up over time exactly how you want it. You'll be WAY ahead financially and have far more time to enjoy, plus no bloody knuckles & Chiropractor bills.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you very much! How can I find out what rear end I have? And what year and model parts truck should I be looking for? I also want to stick with an automatic transmission though what would you suggest?
 

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To find what axle you have go to a search engine and type in '1996 Dodge 2500 rear axle'. The year and model parts truck depends on what features you want, as in which Generation 6BT and which injection pump. Simplest is best with least electronics, easier swap, others want a later pump etc. I suggested some trannies in first sentence in my first post.

I'll also suggest you might take another look at my last sentence I wrote above, could save you a whole bunch of money, time, troubles, labor etc.

Check out the Build threads for ideas, and check out the Tech Stickie and FAQ Sticky in Tech Section and Performance section for much specific information on components. This is one huge site with archives going back for years so it's a great place to educate yourself on doing a Cummins swap.
 
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