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Saw this thread over on Compd. http://www.competitiondiesel.com/forums/showthread.php?t=180405

Going to do this to my Dakota alternator, getting the external regulator or pcm regulator to be consistent has been driving me crazy over the years lol. I've boiled a few batteries and don't want to wreck my Optima.
 

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Saw this thread over on Compd. http://www.competitiondiesel.com/forums/showthread.php?t=180405

Going to do this to my Dakota alternator, getting the external regulator or pcm regulator to be consistent has been driving me crazy over the years lol. I've boiled a few batteries and don't want to wreck my Optima.
I have had the same problem with my damn chrysler alternator, the regulator not being consistent. It drives me insane. I've been considering moving to the mid-mount AC setup so I can switch to a chevy alternator.

Just ordered one myself. Thanks brother bounce
 

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The link went to a regulator that is for 90A....my alternator is more than that......how well does it work in the higher amp service?
 

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No idea. Could prob call and find out though. I'm sure my alternator puts out more as well, but I'll never be using max output on a continuous basis. Most work my alternator will do is recover the battery after starting.
 

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Having been in the alternator repair business from the late 80's through the mid 90's I give you folks a semi educated opinion. I have used and still have some remaining Transpo alternator components. What I am seeing is a redesigned bolt on regulator similar to the ones they sell for agricultural and industrial use. These were usually rated at 14.2 volts in order to prevent overcharging of an electrical system that usually ran 8 hours to continuous duty 24 hour service. Examples would be industrial ac generator sets or air compressors that had been converted from generators to more commonly available automotive based alternators. Most automotive regulators that Transpo sold back then were preset to 14.7 volts. These original conversion regulators eliminated the need to duplicate the automotive designed circuits from which they came. These had an average life expectancy of only a few years however they were cheap, usually around the $20 price range. The stub leads duplicate the original or an earlier triggering version that was used. Mounting the regulator at the alternator has a few draw backs as GM found out over the years. The main culprit is heat which has a direct effect on solid state component devices. GM regulator failure was the most common failure in 90 percent of the GM failures that I repaired. The Ford and Chrysler charging systems of that era that mostly used external regulators which had a much lower failure rate than the GM's. Dodges alternators usually ran until the brush springs contacted the slip roll rings on the rotor. The GM's advantage with the SI series was that I could take a failed one in hand and have it fixed and tested within 20 minutes due to the design.

Transpo makes a good product, or at least they did when I was involved with their products. Maybe technology has overcome the heat issues by now that plagued the internal regulators from the earlier years. I personally think that the automotive manufacturers moved the regulator from the alternator location to the ECM was to eliminate the internal regulator heat factor and to cut wiring costs. The downside was that when the regulator now in the ECM failed you ended up spending more money to replace the ECM than just the costs involved in replacing the regulator as would have done in the past.

I still will also say that there is nothing wrong with the usual Dodge charging systems design that used the external regulator EXCEPT for failure in the worn out wiring harness due to their age, contamination, solder joints, deteriorated connections, rusted ground connections between the engine and chassis to body, broken wires from vibrations, etc. I think the problem arises from exceeding the vehicle manufacturers general life expectancy of a 10 years average. A few years back I pondered making a replacement regulator harness that would use a fender mounted Dodge regulator. I dropped this idea due to both my age and product liability issues that could arise from misuse or improper installations.

I have also had a case where a brand new battery was defective. This put a constant load on the charging system which in turn caused the alternator to run at high output. This caused the alternator to overheat which took out two regulators. This was on an internally regulator GM S10 charging system. I incorporated my test charging system with a different battery and the overheating stopped on the spot. The owner returned the battery and sourced a replacement from a different source. This cured the problem immediately.

In the past there were usually two different regulators for the same style of charging systems based on amperage. The term style relates to the interchangeability of the mounting and connections used in the system. There was some wiggle room on the ratings however if you used a lighter rated regulator you generally had a 50/50 probability of a return within a couple of years. The cost difference was less than $2 so it paid to just use the heavier rated regulator in all the interchangeable regulators.
 

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BobS I have and old 1969 Ford diesel tractor 3500 and the alternator has a big volt reg. box on the firewall that I say smoke coming from it. is there some simple external reg. that I can install and run power direct to the battery for charging? thanks ED
 

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BobS I have and old 1969 Ford diesel tractor 3500 and the alternator has a big volt reg. box on the firewall that I say smoke coming from it. is there some simple external reg. that I can install and run power direct to the battery for charging? thanks ED
You need to first find out what caused the regulator to smoke. Check the wiring harness for a rub through the insulation to ground.
 

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Most times, the simple Mopar 2 wire regulator will work fine. I use one on my 2001 Dodge Cummins, after the ECM based regulator fried my batteries. 2 years on it so far.

Ed
 

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BobS, I agree that the factory system was good, but I see the value in this unit for conversions. I've got a dodge/chrysler alternator in my Land Cruiser, so I'm thinking this will be perfect.
 

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for you guys looking at the picture shown---the black wire DOES not get attached to that screw----the black ground wire is attached under the screw that holds the plate in position----look at the crappy hand drawn picture in the box with the part.....there you go.....
 

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for you guys looking at the picture shown---the black wire DOES not get attached to that screw----the black ground wire is attached under the screw that holds the plate in position----look at the crappy hand drawn picture in the box with the part.....there you go.....
Can you elaborate on this? I went and attempted to install this regulator today but only was able to get the alternator to provide the field voltage that I was supplying from IGN switched power.

I used the pictures in the thread above as a reference.
 

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I just looked at the damn diagram this morning. I see what you're saying now savoy. Can't believe I missed that yesterday, and I wired it up in two different alternators!
 

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i did the same thing---wired 2 like the posted picture---no volts---after calling in like a retard and the guy explaining that black wire was the ground---then relooking at the hand drawn diagram--realized the mistake---ground wire moved---volts are happening at a regulated pace.....
 

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i did the same thing---wired 2 like the posted picture---no volts---after calling in like a retard and the guy explaining that black wire was the ground---then relooking at the hand drawn diagram--realized the mistake---ground wire moved---volts are happening at a regulated pace.....
My next fear was that I would have mistakenly fried the regulator, but sounds like there's a good chance that didn't happen. Thank you sir :cheers: Will install and report back later tonight.
 

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Khaos and savoy, boy do I owe you each a beer. She's wired up correctly and putting out a beautiful (measured) ~14.5v. No more flickering lights or BS external regulator!! Thanks guys.

This is the correct way to wire the regulator up:



One IGN power to the orange wire terminal, positive out to the battery and you're done!!



That tiny regulator replaces this garbage.



Thanks again everyone!!!
 

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we just did the 3rd unit today---boy is happy----next victim 50 hudson 4bt----cant believe the guy that posted up the original wrong puicture hasnt got dogged out yet.....
 

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I'm considering creating an account on that site just to correct him! Either way, thanks for setting me straight.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
My kit just showed up and I'll be doing my alternator soon. Thanks for the pics GLTHFJ60!
 

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Not a problem. It shouldn't take you more than an hour from driving into the shop to driving out. Super simple project.
 

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About 5 years later, it looks like the regulator shit the bed. Alternator quit charging.

Going to open it up and have a look see, but bought two new regulator units from the site above just in case. Only $5 more for the same part I bought 5 years ago, not too shabby.
 
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