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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gentlemen,

I'm thinking about mounting an A/C compressor on the drivers side, next to the first valve cover. It would be powered by it's own v-belt from the fan drive pulley. I have the pulley that mounts to the fan drive, and I have space on the drivers side to mount a bracket for the compressor. From what I have read, other vehicles have used this location to power a vacuum pump. This is in an 87 Jeep Grand Wagoneer that I use as a daily driver. I still have some of the original hoses, and heat exchanger, but I tore out most of the stuff when I put in the 4bt, including the controller. The A/C system did not function.

So my questions...(keep in mind I have never worked with A/C at all:) 1) Will that belt have enough traction to power an A/C compressor? 2) How do I go about choosing what compressor I need? Looks like Sanden is the go-to, but how do I go about choosing a specific model? 3) To what extent are A/C parts compatible? How do I go about getting a system (on somewhat of a budget) that can work together? Should I go to a junkyard and gut everything from one vehicle, or are the systems pretty interchangable? 4) Anybody have a PN or anything for a bracket I can use to mount the A/C

I really appreciate any thoughts you guys have on this. I'm pretty ignorant on the subject! :rasta:
 

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Man i feel what your oing through, i dont have a # but i have seen them on Gallions which are minature cranes. hope it helps you out and maybe you can help me out.
Tomarrow i'll look closer and see if i can help out a little more..
 

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Make sure you have the hood clearance. Some Sandens have twin V belt clutches.
 

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If you set up the pulley to get enough wrap on both the drive and driven pulleys, then yes, a single v-belt will provide plenty of traction.

Does your vehicle have a factory option condenser and evaporator? I'd go with that, then the factory compressor as well if one was offered.
 

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Good questions. #1. A single belt is plenty adequate to pull a AC compressor. Just need plenty of tension so it doesn't slip. #2. I'd stay with the factory style unit that came on that vehicle. That way, if you ever need repairs you're not dealing with something odd. O'Reilly's auto parts site shows the SD709 as the factory compressor for your vehicle. Here's a link. http://www.oreillyauto.com/site/c/d...ck=Search_02645_1182350_-1&pt=02645&ppt=C0354 #3. You can source parts from other vehicles and even mix and match as long as they are compatible. I generally shy away from salvage yard AC stuff. Rebuilt parts and new hoses are not that expensive. #4. Hold onto your drawers because the factory bracket is not cheap. A Case 580M backhoe uses that same style compressor. Here's a link. http://www.colemanequip.com/Case-58...R-CONDITIONING-COMPRESSOR-nZV9/?#partdiagrams If you add up all the required pieces you'll be somewhere in the $600 range. Most guys design their own. You don't see a lot of backhoes with AC on them and that would account for the extreme cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I really appreciate the help.

Redheadbronco- Good point. I just went out and measured the clearance, it's about 8 1/2 inches between the mount point and the closed hood. From what I've read most of the Sanden compressors have a 5 inch diameter, so things should fit as long as I take that into consideration while mounting.

Ralph- Man. That is a beautiful engine bay. Super clean. I really like how low your bracket puts your compressor. Did you fab that yourself, or did you buy it? Something like that would be perfect.

Baytowndaddy-Thanks! I really appreciate that. The case bracket turned out to be pretty pricy...maybe they are using a different one on the Gallions?

GLTHFj60- I was worried that it would not provide enough traction, so I feel a lot better knowing that is not a problem. Should get a lot of wrap:)

char1355- Thanks for those depressing links that remind me how poor I am:) I'll go ahead with what you say and stick with the factory style...but I do have some questions about that.

The old Grand Wagoneers were designed to run r12. I was looking at my condenser, and it seemed quite small. While reading a vintage air catalogue they suggested that with r134a, you have a condenser about the size of your radiator. Is that sound advise? I never know how much to trust someone selling me something :). Maybe I can just charge it with HC12a? Either way...I'm ready for some ice! Let me know what you guys think, I really respect your opinions. I'll keep you updated with what goes down and maybe it can help out someone else.
 

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Forget the old R12. That ship has sailed. You can use one of the replacements, however most AC shops won't install it. There are several versions that actually cool better than R12, but they are flammable. Probably would never be an issue unless there was an accident. Most old systems can be changed over to R134. Sometimes it doesn't cool quite as good. The culprit us usually the condenser. R134 needs a larger condenser to achieve the same cooling as R12. It will still work fine in a older system, but isn't quite as efficient.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
ky-donzi- Something like that would be perfect... my system is set up for a york compressor, so I could plug and play. I'm surprised to hear that though. Seems like the freightliner/cummins high bracket is by the alternator. Maybe they are using the case bracket? I'll see if we have anything around here in the morning. Thanks for the headsup.

char1355-I was hoping to put HC12a, not R12 in. I agree, R12 is outa here. Looks like we are on the same page with it, HC12 is that propane/butane mix you are talking about. Looks like people don't use it cause it's flammable... Feel free to correct me, but I feel like 1 pound of propane is one of the lesser things to worry about in an accident. Besides...I'll be getting a roll cage:)
 

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The stock compressor should be fine, if you go look at Vintage Air or similar you could probably easily get a new condenser designed for 134a, mounting that shouldn't be a major issue if you've done the work to fab in the engine. The stock evaporator will probably be fine, the tricky part with 134a is that the expansion valve/orifice should be different, and that might be a little harder depending on how your stock system is designed. You will need new style hoses, but you'll need new hoses anyway and the barrier style is basically all they sell anyway. Always install a new dryer/reciever in the system. If you are trying to use something other than 134a you'll either need to find a shop that is OK with just evacuating the system for you and has the right adapters for the fittings you'll need to use, or you'll have to invest in the vacuum pump and necessary guages.

Most AC gasses can be flammable under the right conditions, though I think with 134a it's mostly due to the entrained oil, and then only under the right pressures and temperatures. Basically it's not easy to get it to burn compared to a some of the other alternatives.
 
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