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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is their anyone on here with experience and knowledge of writing and coding ecm files? I'm wanting to know if it is possible to write a completely new file to run a ram 6.7 ecm on a common rail four cylinder engine? is it possible to just take a Cummins ecm calibration code from a on highway industrial application (ISB3.8 - ISB4.5) and load it into the ram 6.7 ecm? any and all help is greatly appreciated even if its just getting me pointed in the right direction. Thanks in advance!!!
 

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Way out of my league there. One member who might help is Steed. Haven't heard from him in a while so don't know his status. He works for the US Army. If I were guessing I'd say you might hit some snags in you approach. The 6.7 has a computer controlled turbo as well and the ISB3.9 doesn't. The ISB4.5 wasn't available in this country for a long time but I see them being sold here now. We had the QSB4.5 which is the industrial version. Are you looking for some huge increase in power? The ISB4.5 is available with up to 210 HP and 627 lb ft of torque. That's a lot of grunt.
 

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I've dabbled enough in some ECU code to know how much more is required.

The coding is written in bytes which you can identify tables and maps (maps are 3D tables) using software like WinOLS. This is the level of identifying and tweaking what is there. It's slow and painful to identify and edit. It's almost like floundering around in the dark.

The coding is created using other software to create an instruction tree that is literally a chain of logic statements and look-up tables.
It is possible to reverse-engineer the code back to the original instruction trees, but that requires knowing what it was written in and several other difficult things. The electrical hardware (chipset) and the manufacturers documentation for the chipset can be a starting point for this.

There was a really good article around the VW emissions scandal where someone was able to reverse engineer the code to work out what the test mode was, how it was triggered and what it did to the engine coding.
This might be referring to the same guy, I remember the idle RPM being discussed: 32C3: Dieselgate — Inside The VW’s ECU

Ultimately I think you're better off being able to reverse engineer the code back to the flow-charts and lookup tables, then modify those as required.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
h
I've dabbled enough in some ECU code to know how much more is required.

The coding is written in bytes which you can identify tables and maps (maps are 3D tables) using software like WinOLS. This is the level of identifying and tweaking what is there. It's slow and painful to identify and edit. It's almost like floundering around in the dark.

The coding is created using other software to create an instruction tree that is literally a chain of logic statements and look-up tables.
It is possible to reverse-engineer the code back to the original instruction trees, but that requires knowing what it was written in and several other difficult things. The electrical hardware (chipset) and the manufacturers documentation for the chipset can be a starting point for this.

There was a really good article around the VW emissions scandal where someone was able to reverse engineer the code to work out what the test mode was, how it was triggered and what it did to the engine coding.
This might be referring to the same guy, I remember the idle RPM being discussed: 32C3: Dieselgate — Inside The VW’s ECU

Ultimately I think you're better off being able to reverse engineer the code back to the flow-charts and lookup tables, then modify those as required.
ok so I'm pretty familiar with vehicle electronics especially with Cummins engines. but 90 percent of my knowledge and experience is in heavy truck and equipment. I have been through hundreds of hours of Cummins training over the last 15 years and what I learned from them is that the insides of their ecu's are virtually all the same within each ecu variation. the only difference is the exterior, meaning different harness connectors or they have a external power and ground connector. the ecu's guts or hard parts are all the same and they all have the same basic layout with all the same provisions for each engine family designation. the internal parts are all interchangeable if you had the tooling and knowledge to do so. the ecm that is on the ram engine is the exact same ecu that is on the ISB internally, the difference is the connectors and how it communicates to the ram truck. that same ecu is used on the ISB and QSB engines. what in the ecu gives it the ability to communicate with the vehicle? is it a hard part via a micro chip or processor? or is it completely in the programing?
 

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h

ok so I'm pretty familiar with vehicle electronics especially with Cummins engines. but 90 percent of my knowledge and experience is in heavy truck and equipment. I have been through hundreds of hours of Cummins training over the last 15 years and what I learned from them is that the insides of their ecu's are virtually all the same within each ecu variation. the only difference is the exterior, meaning different harness connectors or they have a external power and ground connector. the ecu's guts or hard parts are all the same and they all have the same basic layout with all the same provisions for each engine family designation. the internal parts are all interchangeable if you had the tooling and knowledge to do so. the ecm that is on the ram engine is the exact same ecu that is on the ISB internally, the difference is the connectors and how it communicates to the ram truck. that same ecu is used on the ISB and QSB engines. what in the ecu gives it the ability to communicate with the vehicle? is it a hard part via a micro chip or processor? or is it completely in the programing?


You might want to look here. ECU Might be a little quicker than histograhming and entire ECU code.
 

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Not yet but I know a few who have used the DSL1 on there om606 swaps. I have an common rail OM648 that I will do in the next few years and will use Balders ECU. there several vids out there with swaps running it and no issues. Balder provides awesome support also. I dont think there are any basemap stuff for the cummins stuff but I could be wrong. Email him and ask. He might be busy right now as its race season in Iceland.
 

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Not yet but I know a few who have used the DSL1 on there om606 swaps. I have an common rail OM648 that I will do in the next few years and will use Balders ECU.
Here's a link to the DSL1 mentioned above. Note: At this site they spell the name "Baldur".

 
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