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Hey guys, I don’t know much about air cooled deutz diesel preferably the 5 and 6 cylinder diesels. From what I have read so far they don’t make a lot of power, is that because they’re not turbo’d? Are there horsepower modifications? Or if you do put more power into them are they gonna break like the 6.2 and 6.5 diesels over time? Also what transitions can you use with them as far as a manual transmission? Can I put a sm465 behind it or a nv4500? Please tell me any other helpful information about these engines. Thanks guys
 

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Best to use at least a 5 speed trans. because of narrow torque band on diesels, 465 not a good choice, 4500, NP-540 series, etc. lookin archives, several have been on here.

Ed in CO
 

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The Deutz brand is one of the oldest internal combustion engine companies. It was founded in 1864. They build a very high quality product and as most diesels they aren't cheap. They have made both non turbo and turbo models in the air cooled versions. As with most high torque diesels, don't let the lower HP fool you. The power can be upped on the engine but care must be taken not to overdo it. Ford offered a dealer installed 5 cylinder in pickups back in the late 1960's or early 1970's. It was very expensive and I've never seen a truck with one installed. There was one of the kits for sale on the forum many years ago but those would be considered very rare. They have also been used in medium duty trucks and buses so they aren't weaklings. They have a few unusual features. You can rebuild them one cylinder at a time. In operation, you want to be sure to keep the cooling fins clean and the fan working properly. Engines came in 1,2,3,4,5, and 6 inline and V6,V8,V10,V12, and V16 up to 2000 HP. When installing on in a swap the first thing you get rid of is the radiator and cooling system. Heat for the cab of the vehicle can be done several ways. One is using engine oil circulating through a cooler unit like water in a heater element or the better system was a small diesel fired furnace unit that would give you instant heat. Those heaters are still in use today and the Germans make the king of them but there are cheaper versions coming out of China these days. About $1300 for the German built unit or $200 for the Chinese. As for transmission adapting, the engines normally have an SAE flywheel housing. For a manual transmission you could used one like a NV4500 with the aftermarket SAE bellhousing. Automatics can be done too using adapters from Phoenix Casting but most prefer a manual type. Of course the transmission from various medium duty trucks would have SAE standard too. Without any mods the 6 cylinder turbo model came in up to 200 HP like the one pictured below. That is a turbo model with an intercooler. Turbos came in 4 and 6 cylinders. Not sure about the 5 cylinder. The engines main drawback is cost and availability. You can buy a rebuilt Cummins 4bt or 6bt in the $6000-8000 range. A Deutz will be near double that. To add a turbo, you have to be careful because these engines have much higher compression than other turbo diesels. Where a Cummins might have around 17:1 the Deutz will be around 20:1 so that limits how much boost pressure you can add. Hope this gives you some ideas.
 

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I have actually worked on the fuel system on one that was installed in a old ford truck. In my opinion they are not the ideal engine for automotive use, but it can be done. They are extremely loud due to the lack of water jackets and the high volume of air the fan moves to cool the engine. They can make ok power, and if you have the correct governor on the injection pump they will drive OK.
 
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