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Lots of interesting info coming out here. if you are using a Dodge Cummins adapter plate, the starter will be on the driver's side. That in combo with the vacuum/power steering pump takes up all the room on that side of the engine. Usually requires a modified starter to even make that work. There would be zero room for a mid engine mount with that setup unless it could be designed to be away from the power steering pump. Also, when using the pump combo, you must consider which injection pump you have. None of the stock Dodge power steering pumps will fit with the P7100. Requires a small round reservoir can and a remote supply. That is true even it you didn't have the vacuum pump in the lineup. When using the vacuum combo, you only need the small round reservoir only since the power steering pump has a special coupler on it. We've had several members go through this ordeal. Now the VE pump will clear the Dodge combo and there the only issue might be starter to pump clearance. You can read member Tinker's thread and see what he went through just to fit the combo unit. Land Rover Disco2: Out with the old, in with the 4BT! Dougal showed an industrial engine but it makes not difference in the block whether it is industrial or not. There were only 2 blocks for the 4bt, the original and STORM, and the mounting bosses are the same on both. Seems the main issue of this thread was controlling engine vibration. The normal angled style engine mounts have never proven to be very good at that. The rubber compound in the isolator is usually too stiff and transfers too much vibration to the frame. The Lord type mounts have been the standard for reducing vibration transfer. That company build aircraft engine mounts and as you know many propeller aircraft engines are 4 cylinder. The industrial mounting system with the SAE setup is a good one but not sure how well it controls vibration transfer. It is a 3 point mounting system with 2 hockey puck style isolators at the rear and one of possibly several types up front. Would need an engine/transmission set up in a lab to test each type of mount and see what degree of reduction they provide. Since the 3 point mounts were used in applications like generators I suspect they do a decent job. We just don't have many members who run the SAE mounts. On that system, there were at least 3 types of the front mount. One with a single puck, one with 2 pucks, and one with a special horizontal isolator. I think that last one was more common on gen sets. Here are photos of each type. Also, there is a whole section on the forum for engine mount that you might scan. Show off ur motor mounts.
 

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What gear are you looking for? Most all the hydraulic type pumps require that adapter MaxPF showed in an earlier post. The Ford and Freightliner pumps are the only ones I've seen that have the correct gear mounted on them. O'Reilly's sells the rebuilt units under part 736-0111 $480.99 +$100.00 core. It shows a gear mounted on the pump but I won't swear that is comes with one. Diesel Tuff sells one that is properly adjusted to 1450 PSI for $359.99 + $49 shipping. It comes with the gear. One model of those is made by ZF in Germany. New ones from Ford are probably over $1000 and that doesn't include the gear. Some of these pumps are aluminum and some are cast iron. The remote reservoir carried a Ford part number F3HT-3531-AB.
 

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