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OK I'm a little late to this discussion, but I have some definite ideas about how to mount one of these engines.

First it kind of depends on how the vehicle will be used. If it is street only then mounts that support the engine and kind of limit its fore and aft and side to side movement, will probably work just fine.

However if the Vehicle is to be used off road in any challenging way then the mounts must not only support the weight of the engine but also positively capture its movement on all three axis'. Otherwise you will end up with holes in your radiator and general disappointment.

I learned a lot while building Early Rock Crawling Jeeps 95-03 ish. and they were evolving with every trip to a competition. The mounts on my Yellow Jeep broke on a mild trail in Moab and it took us 4 hours to recover it after only 5 minutes into the trail. About 200 yards!. That prompted me to design and build mounts using Poly Urethane Spring Bushings in the Tubular Mounts to positively locate the engine on all 3 axis'. No more problems with 12" holes in the radiator.

These mounts utilized the center mounting locations on the sides of he engine rather than the conventional mounts on the Front of Chevy 4's and 6's
These worked perfectly and there were no further failures. Even after rolling the Jeep 4 1/2 times the engine was still in place and running even though it was upside down. My right ear still rings constantly from that episode in 2003 !.
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Moving forward to the DeScrambler I wanted the same basic concept but bigger to deal with the 750 lb Weight of the Cummins 4 BT.

With the 4 BT as an off road power plant I decided it was best to mount the engine on the sides of the block so that the weight of the engine was supported entirely by the mounts independent of any "Cantilever" effects induced by mounting them on the front of the engine and relying on the Transmission mounts to support the rear and divide the entire weight of the power train (1150 lbs total) thus @280 lbs on each mount. This would put undue stress on the joints between the Engine/Transmission/ Overdrive/Transfer Case each of which would encourage oil leakage at some point.

The engine is supported near the #3 cylinder on the drivers side and #2 cylinder on the passenger side by Polyurethane Step Bushings that are 3" in diameter made of 60 Durometer Poly.. I made a mold to pour the Poly around a steel bushing in the center of the bushing.

The right side mount was a little complicated due to having to work around the Turbo Drain and pick up the front mounting holes in the block. The right side is much simpler.

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The rear of the Drive Train is supported by the Crossmember in between the Over Drive unit and the Transfer Case. So in the end the entire drive train is supported by 4 sets of the Poly Bushings, but the weight of the engine is mainly supported by the two engine mounts located on the sides of the engine and the Cross Member is taking the load of the trans and other piece parts. or about 400 lbs,.

Note: the Engine Mounts are bolted to the sides of the Frame Rails which incorporate bushings that go all the way thru the frame rail and are welded in place. In addition there is a "Shear Plate" on the top of the mounts that prevents the mounts from shearing off. So there is 4ea 1/2" G8 bolts holding the frame side of the mounts..

The only negative to this set up is that it does transmit vibration of the Engine to the frame very efficiently. Maybe some day I will go back and remake the step bushings from softer material. BUt for now looking at ways to lessen the vibration that the engine makes in the first place.
However the drive train is located very solidly in all 3 axis'. Period!

OK,,, that is what I did to mount my Engine /Drive Train. YMMV

Randy
Mine is very similar. I used off-the-shelf urethane leaf spring bushings. As I mentioned in the "Show Off Ur Motor Mounts" thread, these work well and provide adequate vibration absorption for a 6, but they would be far from optimal for a 4. A similar mount using the second gen Dodge mount inserts, as shown above in post #87 of this thread, would be much better. Even then, vibration absorption is likely to be marginal for a 4BT, unless you happen to have one with a balance shaft.







These are actually my second iteration of the leaf spring bushing mounts. The first version didn't allow as much slope on the turbo drain. With this version, the slope is still totally inadequate, which is forcing me to put a drain bung in the pan right below the pan rail. Eventually, I will swap to coil front suspension, and when I do so the stock Chevy frame-side motor mount brackets will go away. This will necessitate fabricating yet another set of motor mounts. When I do so, I will likely end up running aftermarket urethane bushings for the Dodge second gen motor mounts. I will still use tubing though!
 

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This pump?









That pump is an Eaton Vickers V10-NF. It is an SAE A mount pump with an 11 spline male input shaft. There are many different pumps available that all mount to an SAE A two-bolt flange and have 11 spline inputs. Note that 9 spline shafts are also available, but 11 spline seems to be more common for PS use. The "NF" in the basic part type indicates that it has an internal pressure regulator valve. Regular V10's for general hydraulic applications can have a pressure control valve or a flow control valve, or no valve at all. The pressure and flow control versions have a separate output for the fluid that the valve bypasses, whereas the NF returns the excess fluid to the pump inlet internally. The pumps without any pressure or flow valves must use an external regulator. The NF pumps are intended specifically for PS use. The pump on my engine puts out something like 6GPM and 2800psi max.

Here's an example of a TRW pump for a Freightshaker application. Its rated for 4.23gpm and 2683psi:




The component that allows the use of an SAE A mount pump is a gear drive SAE A PTO adapter like this one:





If you look around you may be able to find that SAE A adapter on the used market. Im not sure how long the bearings last. Mine came with the engine, and I have no idea how many miles/hours are on it. There is an oil hole between the gear and mounting shoulder that allows splash/drip oil into the bearings for lubrication, so it doesn't rely on grease for lubrication.

The Vickers V10-NF is a very tough, durable, all-cast-iron pump. Its also probably the most expensive. The disposable aluminum pumps like that TRW unit and many others are probably Chinese, which would account for their lower price. Once again, if you can find a used Vickers thats in good shape, it should give very long life. They are easy to re-seal if they leak, and they are completely rebuildable. Theres only a few wear items in the pump, all of which are replaceable. Again, I have no idea of the history on mine, but it makes no noise and works VERY well! I run a spin-on hydraulic filter in the low pressure return circuit (highly recommended) and use only high quality, high vicosity index, anti-wear hydraulic fluids.
 

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Im not positive, but I think the mount that is directly on the timing housing is SAE B. If so, then you are correct: an SAE B pattern pump would bolt right up. However, as you mentioned, a mating gear would be needed. Also, the pump in question would need to be rated to take radial load and axial (thrust) on its input shaft. In the SAE A setup I have, the drive adapter handles all the radial and thrust loads generated by the helical drive gear. Since the pump itself is balanced (that is, it pumps off opposite sides of the rotor equally), the pumps shaft bearings dont have to handle any appreciable load. Thats not to say that the V10 pump cannot handle such shaft loads. I honestly don't know. But it does mean that an inexpensive pump with simple journal bearings could be used with the SAE A load adapter, whereas a pump designed to have a gear mounted directly to the input shaft would both need a much beefier shaft as well as suitable bearings supporting it. Probably a decent size single row or double row ball bearing. Those are all things to keep in mind.

A more basic problem may be finding a direct mount pump that is SMALL enough for PS use. An SAE B mount pump with a 30mm or bigger input shaft is unlikely to be available in displacements small enough for a pickup truck. My pump is borderline too large as it is. I have to use a reservoir that holds over 1.5 quarts of fluid, and I have a PS cooler that was advertised and sold as a transmission cooler.
 

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A Saginaw P series pump is normally regulated at 1200psi max pressure, and can flow 2.75 to 3gpm.
 

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What gear are you looking for? Most all the hydraulic type pumps require that adapter MaxPF showed in an earlier post. The Ford and Freightliner pumps are the only ones I've seen that have the correct gear mounted on them. O'Reilly's sells the rebuilt units under part 736-0111 $480.99 +$100.00 core. It shows a gear mounted on the pump but I won't swear that is comes with one. Diesel Tuff sells one that is properly adjusted to 1450 PSI for $359.99 + $49 shipping. It comes with the gear. One model of those is made by ZF in Germany. New ones from Ford are probably over $1000 and that doesn't include the gear. Some of these pumps are aluminum and some are cast iron. The remote reservoir carried a Ford part number F3HT-3531-AB.
I forgot to mention that, besides the radial load that a directly-gear-driven pump must be able to support, the pump also has to support thrust loads caused by the helical gear.

I agree that probably 99% of the pumps used on these engines are SAE A mount, and require either the SAE A drive adapter like I have or a compressor with an SAE A drive mount on its opposite end.

Some of the aluminum pumps aren't too terribly expensive. However, being SAE A mount, they require the adapter. Ive only found one place that sells them new, and they are $800. The main problem with finding them elsewhere is that I don't have the Cummins part #, nor do I know exactly what they are called. That makes teh search process quite difficult.
 
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