Cummins 4BT & Diesel Conversions Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, I’m preparing to put my engine in, and have been working on my mounts, adapter rings and such. I’ve modeled everything in the computer 3d first in order to head off any problems in advance. This way, my motor mounts will be done ahead of time, and I can have them welded in with the motor out. Anyway, from what I can tell, I’m going to have to tilt the engine 2.5 degrees in order to clear the axle housing. Is this typical? I installed a 2” body lift ahead of time to make sure there was no hood issues, and it appears I wiil still clear the hood after tilting the engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I don't know if its "typical", but if you have a 4bt that came with a Chevy adapter, it lived its life with a 10 degree slant towards the passenger side. With only 2.5 degrees, I think you'll be fine.

MIke
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
477 Posts
As long as this is not in addition to the 8 deg. tilt that is built into the GM style P30 adapter ring you should not have a problem. If you are using the GM adapter ring and are adding another 2 deg to the 8 deg that they already have you may have a problem. If you are usning the 8 deg GM adapter ring and taking 2 deg tilt off of that it would also work fine. If using the Dodge or Ford setup I wouln't thing the 2 deg would hurt anyting since it has been proven that the 8 deg tilt used by GM works fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I was afraid I'd get misunderstood. I'm referring to tilting front to back. I'm making my own adapter ring, with no rotation (in referrence to the typical 10 degrees). Basically the engine is higher in the front than in the back.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
1,447 Posts
I was afraid I'd get misunderstood. I'm referring to tilting front to back. I'm making my own adapter ring, with no rotation (in referrence to the typical 10 degrees). Basically the engine is higher in the front than in the back.
I don't think that'll be any problem. The one in my P30 looks tilted a bit front to rear in addition to the normal 8° to the side.

Now, what I would look at is to make sure you keep your driveshaft phasing right or you might get some driveline vibration. (Or put a CV on it and be done...)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
My last one was easily 2-4* not a problem at yes...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,660 Posts
Again the big thing is oil cooling/travel particularly with the valves and such, and oil pickup in the pan. With such mild angles you should be fine...

On another note on of the best things about these engines is the crazy angles that they run great (diesel seems to run as good if not better as fuel injection on angles)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
engine anglea

the standard front or rear sump oil pans allow for 45 degrees in all direction, but not on a continous basis, info is based off engineering option book.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
131 Posts
Why did they tilt these motors (side to side) in the vans?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,462 Posts
The angle of the engine in relationship to the rest of the drivetrain is critical here. Engines are not installed level and the engine angle does not exactly match the pinion angle at rest. a 1/2 a degree makes the difference between full U-joint life and 20K miles out of U-joints.

Ideally, you measure the exact angle of the engine in relationship to a known "zero" plain on the vehicle. Most manufacturers use the flat portion of the lower lip of the frame just forward of the rear leaf spring hanger. You need a good bubble or digital protractor for this work. The plastic welders protractors are not accurate enough.

The angle of the engine and the rear pinion are designed to match under steady state, light loaded conditions (cruising down the highway). The rear pinion angle changes ever so slightly under load.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top