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I thought it might be a good idea to have some basic guidelines on how we are interpreting the condition of an advertised part. This not only applies to the this forum but in all real world advertising as to what we are expecting when making a purchase. It is intended for educational purposes and should never be misconstrued as any basis for litigation. I know there are various ranking standards that apply to items such as firearms, stamps, radios, baseball cards etc. The following terms are the "Automotive Ranking Levels" that I have been taught over the last thirty years:

NEW - New is what it says it is. New is a part or assembly generally speaking is still in the shipping container and has never been installed into its intended service. New has never been dismantled or reassembled except by its original manufacturer. New always comes with a warranty unless it is "new old stock."

USED - Used is a part or assembly that has been installed in the parts intended service. Used condition can range from a low run time new part to a part that has been in service for unknown years but still functions in its intended application. Used is always a bolt on serviceable part and never a core. Since most parts are generally found in this category the best thing to do is include all pertinent information you have available such as age and overall condition.

RE MANUFACTURED - A remanufactured part or assembly is one that has undergone a complete disassembly down to all its individual components. All components are inspected for wear. Any components that are not within the manufacturers specifications are replaced with new (NOT USED) original equipment manufacturer specification components or new equivalent components. All bearings are replaced. As an example an engine would have replacement pistons and liners where applicable, the crankshaft could be reground, the camshaft and lifters would be replaced, etc. A remanufactured part or assembly should have the same life expectancy as a newly manufactured item that it is replacing. It would also normally come with a warranty. A remanufactured part or assembly has never been tested except by its original manufacturer and has never been put into service. A recently remanufactured part that has been installed and run is technically a used part or assembly. (This is why you are not normally permitted to return an electrical item to an auto parts store after you have installed and used it on your vehicle even if it was just on and off to troubleshoot).

REBUILT - Rebuilt is the shady gray area between remanufactured and repaired. A rebuilt part or assembly is dismantled down to its basic components. All parts are inspected for wear. Only components that do not meet the original equipment manufacturers specifications are replaced; for example not all bearings are replaced, only malfunctioning electrical components are replaced. Replacement components are NEW and meet all original equipment manufacturers specifications. A recently rebuilt part or assembly that has been installed and run is technically a used part or assembly. Rebuilt usually comes with a warranty.

REPAIRED - A repaired part or assembly is dismantled only to the point where a replacement part can be installed. A visual inspection of the remaining parts for defects and wear is normally conducted. The replacement part installed is generally a used part but may be used in conjunction with other new components. An example might be installing a new set of brushes and a new regulator in an alternator and not replacing the bearings or putting a used main shaft in a transmission and replacing one of the mains shaft bearings with a new one. A repaired part or assembly is generally considered as slightly better than a mid to long term used version. Due to the fact that major sub assemblies are "used components" the life expectancy would not be that of a rebuilt or remanfactured version of the same item.

CORE - A core is a part or assembly that is not damaged beyond the extent of being repaired or remanufactured and is normally removed from service before a major catastrophic event. It has all its basic components as manufactured. Examples would be an engine that uses oil but does not knock or an alternator that quit charging but spins freely.

SALVAGE - Salvage is a part or assembly that has undergone a catastrophic event but still has a few functional remaining parts or is an incomplete part or assembly. These remaining parts or assemblies are the source components used in a "REPAIRED" unit. A salvage unit is usually not economically repairable but may be of value as a parts source in some cases. An example would be a truck with the engine and transmission removed or truck with body damage where the repair cost would exceed the value of the vehicle before the damage occurred.

SCRAP - Scrap is a part or assembly that has undergone a catastrophic event and only has the remaining value of its raw materials. It may have some salvageable components or assemblies but is usually not economically feasible to remove them as salvage due to time constraints or the parts value.

This "Sticky Thread" is closed to avoid duplication however your comments are welcome in the following thread that is open for discussion:
http://4btswaps.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1237
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Include a digital photo with your ad.

It would also be beneficial to include a digital photo of the actual item being sold. This would eliminate some of the guess work involved in the physical condition of what you are selling. This would also be beneficial in filing any claims with shipping companies in resolving the original condition of the item at the time it was handed over to them.
 
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