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Sort of curious as to the application of that cast iron extension housing. I though all the Dodge and GM's were aluminum. Are there any ID numbers on the part. Trying to think if anything commercial used that transmission.

PS. Did a bit of reading and that tail housing is listed as a '94 up Dodge. In that case the mount should be a B2852 at O'reilly's for $30.99. That is a totally different number than a GM NV4500. Believe Rock Auto has the Anchor unit for $5.66. Here's a link. http://www.rockauto.com/en/catalog/dodge,1995,ram+3500+pickup,5.9l+l6+diesel+turbocharged,1095971,transmission-manual,transmission+mount,8756
 

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Discussion Starter #102 (Edited)
Char1355 - Thank you for looking at some options (O'reilly and Rock Auto). If you would - take a look at pictures on post #93 above. The cast iron extension has threaded holes that are exactly 4" apart. I'll take a look at the part number if there's any - once I get it back from tranny shop - where they do rebuild. If the part number on the tail housing is inside somewhere, I would not be able to get to it. The mount you found on Rock Auto seems to be stock for cast aluminium extension just by looking at it. Cast iron bolt-on mount would have to be different design. Doing extensive online search, I could not find the bolt on mount for this this cast iron tail housing. It's interesting. Milan
 

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Char1355 - Thank you for looking at some options (O'reilly and Rock Auto). If you would - take a look at pictures on post #93 above. The cast iron extension has threaded holes that are exactly 4" apart. I'll take a look at the part number if there's any - once I get it back from tranny shop - where they do rebuild. If the part number on the tail housing is inside somewhere, I would not be able to get to it. The mount you found on Rock Auto seems to be stock for cast aluminium extension just by looking at it. Cast iron bolt-on mount would have to be different design. Doing extensive online search, I could not find the bolt on mount for this this cast iron tail housing. It's interesting. Milan
I think that the parts Charles found are correct but are pictured upside down. The wider part with the holes gets bolted to the tail housing and the studs would go through the cross member with nuts to secure.

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Discussion Starter #104
On another subject... yesterday I tried to temporarily hook up the turbo, so the engine can be test fire. The air horn this engine came with is 3927106 - 90 degree elbow. This elbow does not clear the valve cover by 1 or 2 eight of an inch, so I could not "turn it" to directly face the turbo compressor outlet. What a bummer! So now I have to get the straight horn part number 3927107 and use 90 degree silicone elbow to clear the valve covers. It's interesting that 3927106 sells for more than the 3927106. Hmmm. talking about boost piping... There are few treads here advising NOT TO use silicone 90 degree reducer, to reduce from smaller ID on turbo compressor to larger ID on air intake. Do these reduced silicon elbows really expand under the 30+psi of full boost and create unwanted turbulence? Thank you. Milan
IMG_3076.jpg
 

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Probably what you need is Cummins part 3918530. That is the air elbow that came on the 1st gen intercooled 6bt Dodge. It faces toward the fender so when reversed it crosses the valve cover. You will have to make a spacer to get it high enough to clear. That would be fairly simple. A flat piece of aluminum stock and some time at the drill press and a hand grinder. Of course it will need an extra gasket and longer bolts. Here's a couple photos of what it looks like. Don't know there's anything wrong with the 90 deg boots so long as they are good ones. At least 4 or 5 ply.
 

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Discussion Starter #106
Getting back to tail-housing bolt on mount option. The cast iron tailhousing part number is NV18305 and based on the response from New Venture tech support the bolt on mount part number is: 716101. New Venture website has this specs sheet listed:
NV Tailhousing mount.jpg
Looking at the drawing there's adapter bar (simple plate) that will bolt on the tail housing with flat head cap screws. That plate is part number 716101-1. It is obvious that this plate is easy to fabricate. With that plate any mount can be used and bolt onto it. It is just matter how wide or long the plate is to accommodate the distance between holes on the mount. So with that the part number found previously on Rock Auto or O'Reilly (by Charles) is correct one! This is just an info for anybody else you may search for it. Milan
 

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The mount I found was for a Dodge. This adapter is apparently to use a Ford mount with that transmission. Of course I'm guessing here.

By the way, there may be another possible intake elbow that wouldn't require a spacer. Need to check out part 3921649. I think but can't be certain that one is a side to side too. I did find a Cummins drawing showing that. Here's a photo of the part. Several truck companies have these for $50 which isn't a bad price.
 

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Discussion Starter #108
Thank you for advice.
As for the air horn I ended up getting used 3927107. That's the one going straight up. Luckily it was available on eBay. Seen this setup on many 4BT and 6BT pictures. With that there would be no problem to point it into any direction. Milan
 

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Discussion Starter #109
Yesterday I tried to crank the engine for the 1st time after all gaskets replacements and changes and all that. It was not successful. The engine did not fire up. This was just temp hook up on the skid to see if engine runs and to discover any issues. As a result of that I have few questions:
1. The engine has brand new lift pump part number 3936316. - Is that the correct one? I read all the treads related to lift pump under stickies section and found that the original Cummunis part number is different. The stock lift pump that this engine came with seems worked fine, but I decided to replace it anyway – it just had the rubber boot torn. This is for P pump 4BT.
2. While I was trying to bleed the system by manually engaging the lift pump I noticed that it is leaking fuel. How it’s possible that brand new pump is leaking? Is this leak related to not have the correct pump?
3. I had hard time to hook up stock 1995 Ford Bronco radiator to 4BT. Mainly because misfit of upper and lower hoses shape and ID diameters. I end up buying 6BT lower hose, but it is a bit loose on the radiator connections. Upper one hose was a pain to fit over the outlet and the bended shape of it will not be a good for permanent installation. Does anybody know what hoses to use to hook it up?
Thank you Milan
 

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The part # for the lift pump is correct. There are probably a half dozen more numbers for that thing. Where was the pump leaking? If all the fitting were properly tightened, it shouldn't be leaking. If it leaks then air could get in. Not sure what that's all about unless it's a defective unit. There is also an upgraded pump on the market. Looks just like the one you have but has a larger piston for more fuel flow. Probably not necessary unless you're pushing the HP envelop. Your engine is only 2/3 the size of a 6bt and about 1/2 of a 6ct yet it has the same lift pump. On the hoses, what size are the radiator in and out? Also, does the engine have the outlet that faces up or forward. If it's up and the radiator has the inlet on the top right side, might check the hose from a Ford 7.3 IDI diesel. That one is 2" on the engine end and 1-3/4" at the radiator. The other option can be to do it like the big trucks. You have a metal pipe except where the connections are made. They did that so you only had about 3" of rubber hose and you could carry spares in the glove box since bot ends were the same size. Unfortunately, it's not so simple with our vehicles.
 

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Discussion Starter #111
Charles - Thank you for your response. 1- Lift pump leak. I have not been able to figure out where exactly it’s leaking from. It seems as from top back (towards engine) running down dripping. First I thought I did not tie the brass fitting on the top, but it was tied, I re-torque it anyway and it did not make any difference. I have to take it out now and see if I can figure out (while removed) where is it leaking from.
2. Radiator hoses – the existing radiator and hoses I tried to fit on 4BT are stock Ford Bronco. Not sure what’s the ID. I would have to measure it. Yes you are right I’m using upper inlet that points straight up and lower is 60 degree pointing down. I’ll take a look both options – Ford 7.3 IDI and metal pipes. I guess Summit Racing would sell the metal one, right? I was also thinking about rubber flexible (goose neck) type of hoses. Milan
 

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That Ford 7.3 IDI hose has good possibilities for the upper. I believe I'm correct that the up pointing outlet is 2". If the radiator is 1-3/4" that would be worth a check. The bottom one will be the complicated one. I have one of the setups that came off the Ford medium duty trucks. It has a inlet that turned 90 deg down. Then a piece of that short hose to another 90 deg facing forward which has a bend on the end making it parallel to the radiator. Then another piece of that short hose to a longer metal pipe running parallel to the radiator. If I remember correctly, that pipe even has provision for a support brace. You could probably get an exhaust shop to make pipes. The main thing would be getting the ends beaded so the hose wouldn't slip off. That HD short hose is made by Gates and it's kind of expensive. They sell it in lengths so you cut it to fit. Some of the flex hose may be a possible too. Here's what that top hose looks like.
 

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Discussion Starter #113
Hello Charles, Radiator hoses – since this setup seems to be full custom I may go with aluminum piping and silicone couplings. Aluminum because that’s the only one I can create beads on it at home (using modified vise grips) and also weld it if necessary. There some write-ups about using exhaust piping. Not sure about that. I cannot weld or bead stainless so that’s out of the picture. Copper is very tempting, pipes are easy to get in any plumbing shop and solder it together with all the elbows. Seen some write-ups mainly on hotrod sites, but I would not be able to make bead on it at home. Hmmm where to get cheap beading kit…?
Just on the side note – going back to #2 step of this tread – this conversion can be done in two days…? LOL Sure!
 

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If your radiator is aluminum, you could go the all out way and use braided stainless hose and fittings like NASCAR. Here's a photo of a setup like that. Probably only take a small mortgage to buy that stuff. Seems like the hose is about $50 / ft but the killer would be those fittings. I might try to design some dies to make beads on standard size pipes. The decent beading tools are just plain expensive. Seems like we have a member who works for a company that can do beading. I'll try to remember who he is.
 

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Discussion Starter #115 (Edited)
There seems to be a room (good business idea) for some low cost simple tool that can do the bead job as good as these expensive one on market.
Braided stainless hose fittings… NASCAR huh? Must be nice to have unlimited resources for these fancy - high end items.
I think I found solution – in this useful write-up: https://www.garagejournal.com/forum/showthread.php?t=55207
Step #7 of that tread is option for homemade cheap bead tool. Should work better than modified vise grips setup. The way I’ll go is on step #15:
I have done it many times on copper lines in 2 different ways...on small diameter stuff, cut a small ring off of the appropriate diameter fitting and solder it onto the tube close to the end and it will form a bead for the hose clamp. On bigger stuff, just make a ring out of 12 or 14 gauge wire and solder it onto the tube...instant bead, costs next to nothing, works great.”
I love that. No need to weld it, easy to assembly, not very expensive, easy to get, can disassemble it if I mess up the angle. Just perfect! I’ll do regular plumbing copper pipes. Milan
 

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Discussion Starter #116
I have another question – gauges. There are few write-ups in stickies section and based on that I’m getting EGT gauge that were not in consideration before. So along with EGT a boost gauge is a must. I’ll plan to have water to air intercooler and am thinking about dual intake temp gauge to monitor air temp before and after intercooler or possibly hook up one of the dual temp to monitor water temp in the intercooler system and the other to air intake after intercooler. The idea is to have manual override for el. fans on intercooler radiator. Do you see any value in that gauge? Is there any value in monitoring fuel pressure? I already have transmission temp gauge. So besides standard stock gauges I intend to keep, anything else that is important to monitor? BTW all gauges are GlowShift
Thank you. Milan
 

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Discussion Starter #117
Just a “short” update… reading some other posts on Full Size Bronco site and other places about header wraps, I decided I’ll get stock 4BT exhaust manifold and turbo housing ceramic coated. I settled for Jet-Hot. They are not in town so I have to ship it out and that adds more to the cost, but they have very good reputation and have life time warranty. Getting it done in one of the local places with unverifiable quality of their work or processes could yield poor results that would backlash in the future. The reason why ceramic coating and not cheap wrap is that I had bad experience with wrapped headers on BKO before and won’t do it again. And not just that… reading about difference between these two – it’s obvious what’s better option is. The turbo blanket was also on the table but after reading some other chat rooms it seems as CC is the way to go. It should improve spooling and potentially add few HP as well. That of course will be hard to verify as I won’t be able to Dyno test before and after. Also the under hood temp will be significantly lower and the water to air intercooler exchange chamber would not get so hot and that is another reason to go extra mile with this setup.
So now the engine still needs to be fired up (after leaking lift pump issue is resolved). Then drill hole into manifold for ETG and then it will be shipped out for coating. The plan is once this is all assembled in truck to get ceramic coating of the down pipe as well. At least the first 1-2 feet. That will get done locally as shipping 3” pipe could get really expensive. Will see.

Now on NV4500 – it has been in local transmission shop for almost 4rd week now. The only guy there who knows how to rebuild it finally pulled it apart. Some additional parts had to be ordered like fork and other that were not part of the rebuild kit that came with it and had to be replaced. Interesting thing is that they never told me about what exactly needs to be replaced to give me a chance to source it online for less. Oh well. Cast iron tail housing that will get bolt on in to replace stock aluminum one cause the shop problem as they could not fit it on and they had no idea what to do with it. They ordered new output shaft. Doing some research on it, calling few places the result is - no need for new output shaft, so they cancelled that. Big relieve. All that needs to be done is bore bigger hole in the tail housing so the sleeve with the lip that goes on the shaft will slide on. The stock cast iron tail housing has that hole too small to accommodate some bearing that it is designed for. So once the hole is bore bigger it will be easy assembly. Also the transmission fluid will have the free path all the way through tailhousing to the transfer case, so the stock seal around NP205 input shaft would have to be replaced with dual seal that will keep transfer case and transmission fluids separate. Most likely it will require more fluid in transmission to compensate for that “overspill”.
So hopefully this info will help other guys who may go through the same setup.
 

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Discussion Starter #118
To continue with previous update of unsuccessful startup the lift pump was removed and inspected. The leak was from the inlet metal tube. The tube was not straight going into the brass fitting and even after re-toque it (while it was on engine) it was leaking. Fixed that and put the pump back. After solid 10 min of manual pumping no bubbles were coming from return line. Transparent hoses were used so it was easy to see. I decided to disconnect solenoid as I did not know if it is working and did not have harness pigtail and did not want to hack the wires. So, with that lever (solenoid was hooked up to) all the way to the front of the engine secured with small bungee cord, starter got to work. Spinning, spinning and NOTHING! Disconnecting one and two lines on the injectors reveals no fluid going out. Seems like there’s still air in the system. Keep cranking the engine and there it was – fuel was shooting from the line. After tightening both lines on injectors, the engine fired up for the first time! AMAZING! Engine runs great. Adding throttle - RPM increased - perfect! At that point it all seems like all that changes (fuel plate, pump advanced timing, governor springs, etc..) and adjustments I did were all good. And then as the engine was still running I noticed it – from underneath the valve cover of the most rear piston a rather large volume of coolant was pouring down on the engine. That can’t be good! Not having idle setup correctly when the accelerator was release the engine died. Removing the valve cover and re-start engine again – I see there’s water spraying out in the air from within the hole of lift rod. Seems like something went wrong when I replaced head gasket. I must have messed up something. Or the gasket is bad? Now everything has to be dismantled and pull apart and replace the gasket. What a setback. But better to find out like this then while the engine is already in the truck. What is the best quality head gasket out there? Some people saying that original Cummins are not that great. Is that right? Thank you Milan
IMG_3152.jpg
IMG_3151.jpg
 

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In general, you will find the OEM Cummins gasket is the best. It's the aftermarket ones you have to be careful of. Some of those are pure junk. Also, there are different thickness gaskets depending on whether the block or head has been cut. Need to measure piston protrusion to be sure. I notice you still have head bolts. You may have to replace those if they are stretched too much. As much work as you're putting into this thing, I'd say change to studs. They aren't horribly expensive. You'll need to have a small amount machined off the rocker pedestals where the nuts sit but that's not major and clean up the bolt holes with a bottoming tap. Member Eggman could do the rock stands if you don't have anyone close to you. Also, might pay to have the head checked and make sure it's flat. The same could be true for the block but I'd have a shop check the head first. A small amount of warp make gasket sealing difficult. Yes, always good to find these hiccups before it's all done.
 

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Discussion Starter #120 (Edited)
The engine head was removed rather quickly. The gasket looks like this:
IMG_3172.jpg
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The copper sealant was sprayed on both sides of the gasket. That sealant came off the gasket and stick to the surface of head and blog:
IMG_3175.jpg
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Should that copper gasket stay on the head gasket, or is this normal? Wondering if I should use that copper ever again...?
Can you please look at these pictures?
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These are from surface of the engine blog. Are these areas an issue? Should I get it resurfaced?
I’m just trying to figure out if I need to get it resurfaced or if the leak was because I put in crappy aftermarket gasket. Thank you Milan
 
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