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Discussion Starter #1
I know people have put the J/W aftercooler on a seperate system but has anyone thought about just a second heat exchanger? i have a ram air hood on my durango that came with it, i was thinking if i could support a heat exchanger under that vent, i could get some fresh air coming in over the heat exchanger to cool the water going to the J/W aftercooler more than the radiator. has anyone tried this or even thought about it? I'm not sure if the performance is worth it or not. The other option is to go straight to A/A intercooler, but i sold the intake parts with the 6bt i had, and I'd need an intercooler.

I just saw a heat exchanger at work that seems like it would work from MSC, but they are pricy, like 150-200 so i can't just try it, unless i can find a used one somewhere, or even a trans cooler, maybe...
 

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I'd not thought about the hood scoop, but I had given thought to putting another heat exchanger in the loop as you describe. Would probably give results similar to the dedicated loop or a CAC w/o as much complication as the dedicated loop and more flexible in plumbing than CAC.
 

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I'd not thought about the hood scoop, but I had given thought to putting another heat exchanger in the loop as you describe. Would probably give results similar to the dedicated loop or a CAC w/o as much complication as the dedicated loop and more flexible in plumbing than CAC.
It does seem pretty simple plumbing wise. The hard part would be mounting it to the top of the engine, i'll have to look at where the scoop is, i know the aftercooler sticks up into it.
 

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I'd also think that you could get away with a smaller exchanger with this setup than you could if going a separate system:

I looked at the plumbing of of the JWAC, and it is what I'd consider optimum if not using a separate exchanger: Water is picked up from lower hose of radiator, through the pump, and immediately off to the JWAC without going through the engine first. Water from the JWAC is dumped on the radiator side of the thermostat, so your water coming to the JWAC is going to be lower temperature than the 180°F - 203°F leaving the engine. It'd be interesting to see what the WP intake / JWAC feed temps are with just the radiator..
 

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I'd also think that you could get away with a smaller exchanger with this setup than you could if going a separate system:

I looked at the plumbing of of the JWAC, and it is what I'd consider optimum if not using a separate exchanger: Water is picked up from lower hose of radiator, through the pump, and immediately off to the JWAC without going through the engine first. Water from the JWAC is dumped on the radiator side of the thermostat, so your water coming to the JWAC is going to be lower temperature than the 180°F - 203°F leaving the engine. It'd be interesting to see what the WP intake / JWAC feed temps are with just the radiator..

yea, i've thought about trying to measure all those temperatures, but it seems like a big pain. I wouldn't mind intake temperature, among some other things too.
 

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I've put little research into this, but just head scratching: lots of stock diesels like Rams have factory AC. I wonder about getting a very small AC pump and assembly, say for a low powered foreign car, and using it to cool mixture?

That is mount this pump so that it pumps refrigerant through copper tubing, which is coiled tightly around the entire air outlet tube from turbo to intake manifold. Even use a heat sink paste for better contact, at least bare metal to bare metal no paint. Wrap it in a good heavy insulator.

Wonder if the super chilling of the mixture and resulting high density of charge would be a greater power advantage than the parasytic loss by running compressor? You still need an evaporator, TXV and all but use the copper tube as the condenser to remove heat from intake system?

I was told that some of the new Japanese compressors are a marvel for efficiency, and I'm sure even in their miniscule size they are more than enough to carry out this chiller function. If it would even improve by a few percent on the overall power curve and a guy could source junkyard parts and build himself, hmmm...
 

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I've put little research into this, but just head scratching: lots of stock diesels like Rams have factory AC. I wonder about getting a very small AC pump and assembly, say for a low powered foreign car, and using it to cool mixture?

That is mount this pump so that it pumps refrigerant through copper tubing, which is coiled tightly around the entire air outlet tube from turbo to intake manifold. Even use a heat sink paste for better contact, at least bare metal to bare metal no paint. Wrap it in a good heavy insulator.

Wonder if the super chilling of the mixture and resulting high density of charge would be a greater power advantage than the parasytic loss by running compressor? You still need an evaporator, TXV and all but use the copper tube as the condenser to remove heat from intake system?

I was told that some of the new Japanese compressors are a marvel for efficiency, and I'm sure even in their miniscule size they are more than enough to carry out this chiller function. If it would even improve by a few percent on the overall power curve and a guy could source junkyard parts and build himself, hmmm...
The only problem there is the amount of heat that needs to be shifted.
A small car AC unit probably shifts 4 kilowatts of heat, a 4BT running 15psi at 2000rpm sheds up to 7.3 kilowatts (10hp) through the intercooler.
 
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