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Discussion Starter #1
I've just completely rebuilt a 91 non-intercooled 6BT to swap into a 98 Chevy K2500. This is my first diesel and my first engine swap so I'd like to run it on my engine cart to make sure everything was done correctly before putting it in the truck. I assume it's fairly simple, but I've never done anything quite like this so can someone please provide instructions on exactly how? I only want to run it long enough to identify any major leaks if possible.

Here she is in all her rebuilt glory.
127679


Bonus pic of the freshly rebuilt NV4500 mocked up. They're not bolted together yet but the clutch and flywheel are installed.
127680
 

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Your wooden floor stand looks very good for supporting the engine. Never try to run one on the regular engine stand. If you plan on running it more than just a very short time, you'll need a coolant supply. I do mean very short time. You'll need to cap off or plug any other open accessory coolant ports. Will need the belt installed so the water pump turns. Of course you'll need a fuel supply and return line and battery power. Light jumper cables are often too light for that purpose. Most single batteries won't make the cut either. Takes a lot of current to turn one of these engines over. You'll need a hot wire to the injection pump solenoid if it still has one. Main issue will be getting fuel to the injection pump and injectors. Getting the air out of the system takes a bit of time. Hand pumping at the lift pump to get fuel into the filter and to the injection pump can sometimes try your patience. You could help that a bit by filling the fuel filter and reinstall it. You'll need to crack open the fuel lines at the injectors one at a time while turning the engine over. At first fuel my only be a dribble. Take care to project your eyes and hands. Once that fuel reaches full pressure it can shoot through your skin. Not a good thing. Be sure the fuel return line is submerged in the fuel supply. Prevents air form getting into the system. A section of clear hose on that line can help you see when the air has cleared up. You would probably want an oil pressure gauge to monitor that. Wouldn't want to crank one up that was building no oil pressure. Sometimes people use a little starting fluid to get it to kick off. Won't hurt the engine as long as you don't go nuts with the stuff. When you start to see some smoke coming from the turbo exhaust you know it's getting close. Once it does fire up, may run a bit rough at first until you get the air out of the fuel system. Don't expect one to run away but taking that precaution can be good. Be ready to remove the wire to the pump solenoid and if that doesn't stop it have a flat board to put on the front of the turbo to choke off the air supply. This doesn't often happen. This is some of the basics.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
By “very short time” are you thinking something like 10 seconds or 1 minute? Also, could you please elaborate more on how to hot wire the fuel solenoid? Just a single wire from the solenoid contact straight to the battery?
 

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Lo,

Not more than a min or so without coolant. The fuel solenoid is grounded already so yes.. just a single wire from the positive side of the battery.

Cj
 

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I limited it to about 15 seconds...
 

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Yes Russ, I was thinking no more than 15-20 seconds without coolant in the system. Not hard to rig up a temporary coolant setup. Also good to have a battery charger on hand. Sometimes a first start up can take some time.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I only want to run long enough to identify any obviously leaks. I was toying with with the idea of rigging up a couple garden hoses to the inlet and outlet and getting water through it like that if need be.
 

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Your wooden floor stand looks very good for supporting the engine. Never try to run one on the regular engine stand. If you plan on running it more than just a very short time, you'll need a coolant supply. I do mean very short time. You'll need to cap off or plug any other open accessory coolant ports. Will need the belt installed so the water pump turns. Of course you'll need a fuel supply and return line and battery power. Light jumper cables are often too light for that purpose. Most single batteries won't make the cut either. Takes a lot of current to turn one of these engines over. You'll need a hot wire to the injection pump solenoid if it still has one. Main issue will be getting fuel to the injection pump and injectors. Getting the air out of the system takes a bit of time. Hand pumping at the lift pump to get fuel into the filter and to the injection pump can sometimes try your patience. You could help that a bit by filling the fuel filter and reinstall it. You'll need to crack open the fuel lines at the injectors one at a time while turning the engine over. At first fuel my only be a dribble. Take care to project your eyes and hands. Once that fuel reaches full pressure it can shoot through your skin. Not a good thing. Be sure the fuel return line is submerged in the fuel supply. Prevents air form getting into the system. A section of clear hose on that line can help you see when the air has cleared up. You would probably want an oil pressure gauge to monitor that. Wouldn't want to crank one up that was building no oil pressure. Sometimes people use a little starting fluid to get it to kick off. Won't hurt the engine as long as you don't go nuts with the stuff. When you start to see some smoke coming from the turbo exhaust you know it's getting close. Once it does fire up, may run a bit rough at first until you get the air out of the fuel system. Don't expect one to run away but taking that precaution can be good. Be ready to remove the wire to the pump solenoid and if that doesn't stop it have a flat board to put on the front of the turbo to choke off the air supply. This doesn't often happen. This is some of the basics.
WD40 works good as a primer... They'll start on it..
 

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I've just completely rebuilt a 91 non-intercooled 6BT to swap into a 98 Chevy K2500. This is my first diesel and my first engine swap so I'd like to run it on my engine cart to make sure everything was done correctly before putting it in the truck. I assume it's fairly simple, but I've never done anything quite like this so can someone please provide instructions on exactly how? I only want to run it long enough to identify any major leaks if possible.

Here she is in all her rebuilt glory.
View attachment 127679

Bonus pic of the freshly rebuilt NV4500 mocked up. They're not bolted together yet but the clutch and flywheel are installed.
View attachment 127680
I suggest an emergency shutdown plug for the turbo in case the motor over reves: This is the one was
emergency shut-off plug for turbo intake.jpg
built for hopefully the test on sunday
 

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just did this with mine, week ago, hanging from engine hoist and in a similar wood enclosure, bleed fuel and crank to produce oil pressure, 15 second intervals with couple stand by minutes cool starter, engine will jump from torque when it fires and idle, be prepared and careful, diesels dont heat quick, you can run for couple minutes and not experience any temp at head, they need the aluminum adapter plate, flywheel, stater to fire, adapter wont handle the weight hanging engine on stand.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
just did this with mine, week ago, hanging from engine hoist and in a similar wood enclosure, bleed fuel and crank to produce oil pressure, 15 second intervals with couple stand by minutes cool starter, engine will jump from torque when it fires and idle, be prepared and careful, diesels dont heat quick, you can run for couple minutes and not experience any temp at head, they need the aluminum adapter plate, flywheel, stater to fire, adapter wont handle the weight hanging engine on stand.
Additional support from the engine hoist is a good call. I hadn’t thought of that. Thanks for the advice.

I had figured on a piece of 2x6 to choke the turbo if it tries to run away.
 

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WD40 works good as a primer... They'll start on it..
Yes . Spray WD40 sprayed directly into the intake manifold & if nessesary a 1second burst of either staring fluid sprayed in the general area of the intake ! If it knocked you have sprayed to much. I have not ever had to blead the individual injectors
Good luck , Robert!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Having trouble getting the starter to turn over the engine and need some help now. Bendix is engaging the teeth on the flywheel and turning maybe 10-12 teeth before stopping.
  • This is happening identically with two starters. One of which is brand new.
  • I’m using a brand new pair of 2ga 20’ jumper cables to jump the starter from a running truck.
  • The truck’s battery has 800CCA and 1000CA.
  • Engine turns over with a breaker bar just fine.
  • Jumper cables feel warm through the insulation after a crank or two.
  • Voltage at the battery is 13.6 and drops to 10 during cranking
  • Voltage at the starter drops to 8 during cranking.
Any advice? Are these cables too long or not heavy duty enough and not getting enough juice to the starter?
 

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Having trouble getting the starter to turn over the engine and need some help now. Bendix is engaging the teeth on the flywheel and turning maybe 10-12 teeth before stopping.
  • This is happening identically with two starters. One of which is brand new.
  • I’m using a brand new pair of 2ga 20’ jumper cables to jump the starter from a running truck.
  • The truck’s battery has 800CCA and 1000CA.
  • Engine turns over with a breaker bar just fine.
  • Jumper cables feel warm through the insulation after a crank or two.
  • Voltage at the battery is 13.6 and drops to 10 during cranking
  • Voltage at the starter drops to 8 during cranking.
Any advice? Are these cables too long or not heavy duty enough and not getting enough juice to the starter?
Definitely too long.. better to take the batteries and connect them with minimum 2/0 cables from what I have read.. i tried it with standard battery 2 gauge cables at 20 inches and they heated mighily...
 

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Jumper cables won't cut it. The alligator ends can't supply the current needed to start one of the these engines. You can use a 2 gauge wire but it needs to be 3 feet or less with good solid crimped terminals on either end.
 
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