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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Finally decided to build up rebuild this 68..... broke rear axle 25 years ago and just never fixed.....had people steal from it over the years....

so need a rear axle, fuel pump and back seat.... anyone know the orginal tire size? or vcan i just put 31x9.50x15?


probably need gas lines and tank cleaned out.... 41k original miles on engine.

i never took the top off, is that a bad thing?


any leads would be helpful on parts...

any helpful hints?

I have a neighborhood mechanic that will do the work, i need to find parts.
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
As I recall, the steering box on those Scouts was prone to breaking, so check carefully.

Ed in CO


Thank you Ed,

will be building for sons and grandsons to use on weekends in the hills or cruise town, fishing, etc...

I heard I can use an entire rear differential housing assembly from another make of vehicle... I wonder if you know which newer vehicle fits the same????

Ray
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I believe the standard tire size was 6.00 x 16 which is 28" diameter. A close radial size is 185/80R16 which is 27.7". 15" tires don't fit the stock rims.

Thank you very much.....


I heard I can use an entire rear differential housing assembly from another make of vehicle... I wonder if you know which newer vehicle fits the same????

Ray
 

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On your rear axle, why not repair it. That should be a dana 44 which is strong enough for that vehicle and parts are readily available. Just have to determine which dana 44 you have. There were some changes around 1968-1969.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
On your rear axle, why not repair it. That should be a dana 44 which is strong enough for that vehicle and parts are readily available. Just have to determine which dana 44 you have. There were some changes around 1968-1969.

ok, i attached pics of broken axle 1 piece next to scout, other piece in back of truck bed...... is this repairable.... i hope so.... if so what do i need.... im sorry I am ingnorant.... I have a mechanic... very busy guy.... he only wants jobs with parts ready to go... thats it.


please let me know if I can still somehow repiar this axle.
 

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That keyed axle will not hold up. Modern D-44’s to fit Jeeps of different widths and with modern brakes and positraction are readily available. I would suggest you check into that. 4wd Magazines advertise those services.

Ed in CO
That looks like the early offset to passenger side.Same drivetrain as Jeeps of the time. Don't recall weather an offset Dana44 was ever made without the removable(keyed) hub. A olderJeep rear with same Spicer 18 transfer case(dual stick like your Scout) may bolt right in. Sometime on the mid-late 60's they change to center drive with model 20 transfer case.. I had 68 CJ5 with V6 engine, which by that time had changed to center drive.It may have been in 64 as that was first year for the v-6(if memory serves) The 4 cylinder Jeeps were mostly 5.38 ratios which is likely what you have in that rear.
 

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That looks like the early offset to passenger side.Same drivetrain as Jeeps of the time. Don't recall weather an offset Dana44 was ever made without the removable(keyed) hub. A olderJeep rear with same Spicer 18 transfer case(dual stick like your Scout) may bolt right in. Sometime on the mid-late 60's they change to center drive with model 20 transfer case.. I had 68 CJ5 with V6 engine, which by that time had changed to center drive.It may have been in 64 as that was first year for the v-6(if memory serves) The 4 cylinder Jeeps were mostly 5.38 ratios which is likely what you have in that rear.
The knowledge base here continues to amaze me!
 

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I was going to ask you which motor it has.
An old hunting buddy had a 1968 many years ago ..We loved it His was a 345 cid motor.
But I don't think he had but maybe a 4:11 rear gear .. He ran about 65mph on high.
 

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The knowledge base here continues to amaze me!
It is hard NOT to expand your world with this Crews knowledge base and skillsets, and we are lucky to be part of it.
 
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Put a roll bar in it and make sure the seat belts work. The first traffic accident casualty that I ever witnessed was a passenger in one of these scouts. It was a roll over and the lady had her head flattened. That haunted me for many years. Looks like you might be in PA?
 

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The Scout 4 cyl's were the right bank only of a V8. I think they were 196 cubic inches displacement, which would make them 1/2 of IH's 392ci V8..Their cooling system is exceptionally well designed when compared to other light duty engines (Ford, GM, Mopar), but their cylinder head port design is abysmal - an object lesson in what not to do. They're also a "Slant 4" in design layout, although I'm not sure if the cylinder bank is slanted at 45° like either bank of a V8 - it may be less of an angle.

With the extra 20 inches of wheel base that the 80/800's have over the MB & CJ-5's, having that offset rear diff may not be as important. By mixing and matching parts from a Dana 20 and it's existing Dana 18 transfer case it may be possible to have a centered rear output Dana 18 (I know this can be done, it's a question of getting the right splines and tooth counts for it to work), which would allow the use of far more common axles. Advantage of doing this instead of just plugging in a Dana 20 is the 18's lower low range ratio.
One common axle donor are Scout II's. If you can find a '74-up donor you get a pair of D44's and the front will have Ford caliper based disc brakes. I've seen some Scout II D30's with disc brakes, but those seem to be rather rare and no literature that I've read ever has mentioned their existence.
 

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That must have been some wild ride to break that rear axle. Could it be repaired, yes but you probably need a good axle shop to do it. Going to need a new tube and axle shaft at least. Now for dimensions on that axle in case you want to consider an alternate. The Scout 2 which was later than yours had axles that were 57.1" wide. That is basically mounting surface to mounting surface. The 800 axles are narrower at 55.7" wide. Used axles for you vehicle are out there but some of the prices will make your eyes water. I saw one company that has them for $2153.26. Had to look twice. Thought that might be a custom replacement price. LOL. Maybe repairing the old axle isn't such a bad idea. An early Ford Bronco is 58" so it's a bit too wide. There are a few Jeeps that are in that 55.7" range. The '81-85 CJ8 Scrambler and "82-86 CJ7 are 55.0" which is close. Another thing you'd want to be sure of is the bolt pattern on the hubs unless you plan on changing the front axle too. You'd have to be careful if you looked for a Jeep rear because they had some narrow tracks in those years which wouldn't work. Also need to know what axle ratio you have. There should be a tag on the lower left side facing the rear with the ratio number. I believe standard axle ratios on the 800 4-196 were 4.09/4.10 but you'd want to check that. Not sure if there are any more modern vehicle with axles that would possibly fit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
That must have been some wild ride to break that rear axle. Could it be repaired, yes but you probably need a good axle shop to do it. Going to need a new tube and axle shaft at least. Now for dimensions on that axle in case you want to consider an alternate. The Scout 2 which was later than yours had axles that were 57.1" wide. That is basically mounting surface to mounting surface. The 800 axles are narrower at 55.7" wide. Used axles for you vehicle are out there but some of the prices will make your eyes water. I saw one company that has them for $2153.26. Had to look twice. Thought that might be a custom replacement price. LOL. Maybe repairing the old axle isn't such a bad idea. An early Ford Bronco is 58" so it's a bit too wide. There are a few Jeeps that are in that 55.7" range. The '81-85 CJ8 Scrambler and "82-86 CJ7 are 55.0" which is close. Another thing you'd want to be sure of is the bolt pattern on the hubs unless you plan on changing the front axle too. You'd have to be careful if you looked for a Jeep rear because they had some narrow tracks in those years which wouldn't work. Also need to know what axle ratio you have. There should be a tag on the lower left side facing the rear with the ratio number. I believe standard axle ratios on the 800 4-196 were 4.09/4.10 but you'd want to check that. Not sure if there are any more modern vehicle with axles that would possibly fit.


well, my son said it was a wild ride indeed... place called Hollister Hills in california....

I attached pics of identification tags of my rear axle, hoping someone can tell me what I had and also pics to show extent of damage close up to see if repairable???
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Here is close up images of extent of damage---- repairable???
 

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