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Discussion Starter · #562 ·
I am loving that dash, I was skeptical at first as I love the D2 cluster but thats turned out really well!
Me too honestly, was not expecting the result to look so "fancy" (maybe too nice for that interior haha!) like something out of a small aircraft.
 

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Discussion Starter · #563 ·
Very, very nice. Where's the secondary instrument cluster going?
I'm thinking the additional powertrain related gauges will go in a panel that'll replace the old Rover HVAC controls, and the electrical related gauges will go up on the headliner storage panel or down on the center console where the old automatic shifter assembly was.
 

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Me too honestly, was not expecting the result to look so "fancy" (maybe too nice for that interior haha!) like something out of a small aircraft.
I just wish they did a rubber moulded floor matting system to replace the carpet for D2s like Wright Offroad do for Defender, would be ideal for those outdoors types in boots
 

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Discussion Starter · #565 ·
It's a funny coincidence that the Rover's interior color is SO very near to the "Cummins biege" that I've applied here to the new gauge cluster:

 

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Discussion Starter · #566 ·
A full dashboard AND a proper gauge cluster... what is this, some kinda road worthy vehicle now? 😆


Also trying to keep up the momentum with organizing the shop. Now I'm on the hunt for a small-ish mill and a lathe, so hopefully the work I did to seal the place up has worked.
 

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Discussion Starter · #567 ·
Here's the process of modifying the new manual transmission shifter and the original dashboard, so they play nice together... plus a bunch of test rips rowing thru the gears to get a feel for the new shifter movement:

 

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Nice work. That thing needed a shifter like I had in my old '73 F100 with the NP435 transmission. See photo below. That transmission was also under the dash. You remind me some of a young kid I've watched on YouTube. From an early age he was an internal combustion enthusiast. He built a motorized tricycle, a 4 wheel motorcycle, an off road lawn tractor, and a special 6 speed motorized sofa. Wonder what the girl friends thought about that one. LOL. In his senior year of high school the built a 40% scale M26 Pershing tank. His current project he began in 2018 is a built from scratch car. By scratch I mean the frame was a couple sticks of 2x4 tubing and the body a stack of sheet aluminum. He fashioned it after a 1920's-1930's Indy racer. His workshop has a lot of old school tools. A lathe, milling machine, drill press, metal break, and an English wheel. No computer stuff in his shop. How many kids know how to use an English wheel to fashion body panels. He had never touched one and in days was turning out beautiful pieces. He's also a very good welder. If he doesn't have a tool he makes it; His latest segment was to make adapter plates for a Jag 2.4 engine to a flat head Ford bellhousing to a Chevy T5 transmission. His work is as good as any professional. He's in his second year of college now and not sure what he's studying. Here's a couple of links to his project. The first is him making a stainless grille for the car and the other 2 are the engine/trans adapters. Wish I had this kids ability.
 

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Hey Tinker, I had the same shifter issue in my land cruiser 80 4bt nv4500 swap and i took the shifter off the transmission, then took the rod out of the nylon square piece so i wouldnt melt it and i put a little goose neck in the rod (acetelyne torch). It will put the long shifter rod at an angle but another bend in it straightens it out. Works great. I can get a picture later. Fred
 

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Discussion Starter · #570 ·
Nice work. That thing needed a shifter like I had in my old '73 F100 with the NP435 transmission. See photo below. That transmission was also under the dash. You remind me some of a young kid I've watched on YouTube. From an early age he was an internal combustion enthusiast. He built a motorized tricycle, a 4 wheel motorcycle, an off road lawn tractor, and a special 6 speed motorized sofa. Wonder what the girl friends thought about that one. LOL. In his senior year of high school the built a 40% scale M26 Pershing tank. His current project he began in 2018 is a built from scratch car. By scratch I mean the frame was a couple sticks of 2x4 tubing and the body a stack of sheet aluminum. He fashioned it after a 1920's-1930's Indy racer. His workshop has a lot of old school tools. A lathe, milling machine, drill press, metal break, and an English wheel. No computer stuff in his shop. How many kids know how to use an English wheel to fashion body panels. He had never touched one and in days was turning out beautiful pieces. He's also a very good welder. If he doesn't have a tool he makes it; His latest segment was to make adapter plates for a Jag 2.4 engine to a flat head Ford bellhousing to a Chevy T5 transmission. His work is as good as any professional. He's in his second year of college now and not sure what he's studying. Here's a couple of links to his project. The first is him making a stainless grille for the car and the other 2 are the engine/trans adapters. Wish I had this kids ability.
I think I'll call that shifter a "gooseneck" haha! And wow that's an impressive resume, probably would've been a hell of a hotrodder if he was born a few generations back! I'm for sure having a look thru those videos later on, seems like some of my favorite youtube channels have been recommended on account of sharing my work on the Disco.
 

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Discussion Starter · #571 ·
Hey Tinker, I had the same shifter issue in my land cruiser 80 4bt nv4500 swap and i took the shifter off the transmission, then took the rod out of the nylon square piece so i wouldnt melt it and i put a little goose neck in the rod (acetelyne torch). It will put the long shifter rod at an angle but another bend in it straightens it out. Works great. I can get a picture later. Fred
Solid idea and probably would look a bit better plus less bulky than my fix for it, and much appreciated!
 

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Discussion Starter · #572 · (Edited)
Exhaust gas temp sensor installed, but had to drill out my previous tapped hole that was a size too small (eighth vs quarter inch npt) and of course it went a little crooked... probably should've taken the manifold off too. Oh well, hopefully the off-kilter sensor will distract from my TERRIBLE paint job on the engine block that didn't hold up due to the winter cold a few seasons back :( (very much looking forward to a redo on that next summer when I do the frame rails too)


While I was at it I chucked in the boost gauge's pressure sensor right into the turbocharger's outlet elbow (putting the gauge reference as near to the turbo as I could)


Lots of wiring, but a good test run before the thousand+ feet of motorsports grade Raychem "spec55" wire I ordered gets here for the full rewire job:



Did a quick test fire to check the status of all the new readouts and aside from dialing in the NV4500's VSS to match GPS readings it looks like all I have to work on is the tachometer signal that I'm trying to steal from the old Rover alternator... but I kind of expected that to take a little fiddling around to get right (plus I have a laser RPM reader to verify the gauge reading when it's working properly)
 
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Discussion Starter · #573 ·
Upgraded the shop! Scored a pre-war era vertical milling machine, and locally made to boot (Jackson Machine & Tool No.2). Couldn't have done it without the help of a couple friends with the skill & muscle to tear it down & rebuild it again 30 miles away. It's in surprisingly good shape for being near 100 years old & thankfully came with a bunch of old tools, so I don't have to feel bad about breaking them as I learn.


I'm excited to see what I can do with a level-up like this, even though I have very little knowledge in that department, but thankfully I have smart friends! Can't help but think that a lathe & TIG welder are in my future as well now... Don't have what I need? Now I can make it! :D
 

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That old mill is awesome!! What tooling does it use? Looks like it has an outside taper on the spindle, unless that's an end mill holder installed without an end mill in it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #575 ·
That old mill is awesome!! What tooling does it use? Looks like it has an outside taper on the spindle, unless that's an end mill holder installed without an end mill in it.
It's so cool how stout & simple it is! That's just an empty holder in there, & it uses #10 B&S taper holders. They look so long + thin compared to what we use for the more modern CNC's I work with that I didn't immediately realize they were holders. Unfortunately someone else beat me to the punch with a majority of the tooling, but it did still come with a handful of those holders & odds 'n ends to get me started.
 
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Yes, our forefathers built machines designed to last well beyond their time. I watch one guy on YouTube who has some machines that go back into the late 1800's. He powers them with a steam engine and line drive pulleys. Going to have some fun with this new toy. Some young machinists would probably look at it and ask where's the computer readout. LOL.
 

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Discussion Starter · #577 ·
I thought for sure that these Rover alternators had a "W" wire you could tap into for an RPM pulse signal, but after cracking it open it would appear I was wrong on that one...


So I had to get creative and drill & tap a tiny hole into one of the stator field windings for my new "W" wire to drive my tachometer gauge:


Took it for a drive & thought I had all the gauges working... although sadly after a bunch of testing it seems the "vehicle speed sensor" in the transmission is dead, but at least the rest of the cluster is alive 'n kicking:


Also had the final bits of my wiring arrive for the Rover's full rewire project... well over a thousand feet in this tote, going to be a big job! Big stuff is all marine-grade tin coated & silicone wrapped, while all the smaller is Raychem Spec55 motorsports grade wire, & the wrappings all aerospace kit. Here's hoping all the work I've been doing on the temporary/test wiring pays off so I don't let the smoke out of this good stuff:
 

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Discussion Starter · #578 ·
Almost forgot to share the video of the all the detail work on that custom gauge cluster I've built (much more than just these images here)

 

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Discussion Starter · #579 ·
Lots of driving footage & getting the gauges dialed in (pun intended) plus some custom work to get the alternator hacked to supply a signal for the tacho:

 
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Discussion Starter · #580 ·
I spent some time going thru everything on the new (to me) Jackson mill... bolt checks, lubricating, measuring for new accessories I have planned, and adjusting/checking the accuracy of the 3 table axis + 2 head axis movements. I'd say having .0025" runout on average & the only backlash to keep an eye on being in the table X-axis isn't half bad for a 90 year-old machine!

 
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