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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all, I am new the forum here. truth be told, I am not swapping anything, I am rebuilding the 4B out of my case skid steer, and I am looking for a little clarification, I appreciate the help if anybody is able.

I am on the way with this project. its out and all torn apart. crank needs to be replaced. initial issue was a bad injector that ruined a rod, the bearing, and the crank. measured the block, and it needs bored 40 over on all cylinders. I got a crank ordered. I am about to order things from Pure Diesel Power. However, I am just stuck on this small piston/large piston thing. could anybody give me some info? Seems its not too straight forward, haha. My application is a skid steer, so I am thinking mostly marine style. I have been told it most likely has large bowl pistons. but it seems pictures on the web are so diverse and different. I just want to make sure I get the right piston/injector combo.

I am looking at this kit bored 40 over McBee 3.9L 4BT Cummins Engine Rebuild Kit
I am looking at these injectors 3.9L 4BT 8V Cummins Contagious 5x.011 SAC Injectors
Those injectors also will also need to be used in conjunction with the 7-9mm sleeves as my stock injectors were 9mm and cant seem to find those anywhere. they said this is fine.

These were all recommended by Pure Diesel after answering their questions, I am just following up/confirming because I am so confused about the piston situation. Here is a photo of my current pistons. Are these large bowls or small bowls? ughh!! haha.

Thanks for all the help!!
 

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The bowl shape and volume has varied a lot over years. Do you have the serial number for your engine? If so, I can look up what Cummins specs for it. Bowl design is often because of injector spray pattern or smog control. Most all 4B engines would have slightly wider bowls since the have 155 deg spray angle injectors. Also, a 4B may have a slightly higher compression ratio but that's not always true. You mention marine style bowls and that is a popular replacement type piston. True marine pistons would not be used in a 4B. They are low compression and wouldn't work well for that. Also, the 4B pistons are not the same as 4BT. They use different rings. You can use 4BT pistons in a 4B but not the other way around. Below is a photo of a 4B piston and it looks very much like the one in your photo. On the injectors, those need to be matched to your injection pumps for pop pressure. Stock injectors for you engine were possibly 4x.012 with 9mm tips. Cummins quit using those and any replacements from them are 7mm tip plus the sleeves you mentioned. 9mm heads had a bad reputation for cracks. Need to check yours. Those 5x.011 units are sort of odd size.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey this has been a lot of help, and seems like you know a little what your talking about. I am an auto mechanic, very capable of doing the work, but dont know history and details of diesels much, so this helps. I can give you the ESN sure, it is: 44538150.

I will definitely have the head checked out, thank you for that info!

the pump has actually been replaced as well, it is this pump exactly D&W Diesel
which matched the numbers of the old pump exactly, and matched it in every other visible detail

so you think what I have is large bowl (of some sort, lol) pistons? which means I need large bowl injectors?
How do I know the injectors are matched to the pump? you said those injectors are sort of odd size? Do you recommend another set, something you can link me? Hoping somebody is able to confidently send me a link for a kit including pistons (bored 40 over) and then good matching injectors haha

sorry for all the questions!
 

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OK. You have one of those engines that I can't tell you a lot about. The reason being is it has been rebuilt by Cummins and a new serial number assigned. Only info showing is the build date. A Cummins dealer might be able to look at the rebuild sheet and tell you info but I don't have access to that. The injection pump is a Delphi model and fairly common on industrial engines. I'm curious. Does you engine ID plate show a CPL number? If I have that I might find another engine serial number to look at. Your pistons on that units won't be the small bowl 145 deg ones because those were only used on the A and P injection pumps. The pistons usually referred to as large bowl were like the ones used on the early engines. Your current pistons would probably be part 3802064 for .040 (1.00mm) over. You could get those down at the local Cummins store for around $250 each. LOL. Need smelling salts when you go there to buy. You can find them aftermarket in the $60-80 range. That is complete kit with rings, clips, and pin. See photo below. In the second photo you see the smaller bowl compared to the large bowl marine style piston you mentioned. That style bowl is an aftermarket design. Mahle has them as well as many importers. They generally had 17.5:1 CR where the 4B was 17.3:1 so no problem using them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
People keep asking me for a CPL number, but I cant find that anywhere. they said look on the tag on the side of the timing cover. i attached a picture of that tag. where else would a cpl number be?

I understand you wont be able to answer all my questions. you are giving a lot of good info, but I still need some clarity to put together the pieces of what your telling me.

So you are saying my pistons are large bowl? Ok, got it. Ive seen that photo comparing the two. I notice mine has the point like the large one, but the over all size seems to fall somewhere in between those two...idk maybe im just seeing it wrong
So, the kit that I linked.. are the pistons included in that kit right for my application? Or do I need to buy my pistons separate and buy a gasket kit without pistons? is there a 'wrong' and 'right' large bowl piston? as long as its 40 over... If pure diesel says the pistons included in that are right for my 4B motor, are large bowl, and I select .040 over, are we good to go, or are there many other details I need to know about? thats what seems to be the case, but maybe I am just confused by all the jargain and over thinking it....
and still dont know what to do about injectors, lol. How do I know a set of injectors is right for motor? simply if they say large bowl? or the 5x.011 numbers? (not even sure what that means yet) The spray patter? many injectors I look up dont even give the spary pattern degrees. or does that just coincide with large or small bowl style? ughh this is racking my brain!
thank you very much for helping!
 

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On the pistons, there were basically two bowl sizes and just looking at them you might not notice much difference. Injectors fired in either a 145 deg or 155 deg patterns so the bowl which is the combustion chamber needs to fit the spray pattern for proper combustion. You could use 155 deg pistons with 145 deg injectors but wouldn't want to do the other way around because part of the fuel would be spraying outside the combustion chamber. The large bowl most are referring to is the marine style bowl in that second photo above. That piston was designed by Mahle/Clevite as a sort of universal replacement but are also found under a Cummins part number. Just for info, Mahle makes pistons for Cummins. The Cummins part 3802134 for the .040 oversize. Those are darned expensive if you get them from Cummins. Near $300 each. If they don't come in that pretty brown Cummins box, you can get them in the Mahle box under part 224-3523WR.040 for $84.87 each. Bit of price markup on Cummins parts. LOL. The bowl is basically like the marine pistons only shallower so the compression isn't lowered. Below is a photo of a true marine piston. Those have a compression ration of 15.3:1 where the marine style is 17.5:1. You wouldn't be getting into those because that lower compression makes starting a bit hard, especially in colder weather. If you looked up all the pistons Cummins had for just the B series engines, I suspect you'd have a page or two of part numbers. On your rebuild, I'd use turbo type pistons because they tend to be cheaper and will work perfectly fine. 4B pistons tend to be expensive because they weren't used as much. If you get a rebuild kit that is suited for a B series engine with a VE injection pump the pistons in that kit would be for 155 deg injectors. That's one reason for those large bowl pistons since one type fits both styles of injectors.

Now on injectors. The number 5x.011 means that the tip of the injector has 5 holes that are .011" ID. Your stock injectors were likely 4x.012 or something similar which had 4 holes that are .012" ID. Those 2 injectors would flow almost the same fuel. More holes of smaller size make for a better burn in combustion. Many companies advertise injectors of so much HP gain. That is junk info and not technical. The 5x.011 you found is what should be shown and I'd think they know what they're talking about. If you have your old injectors there should be some numbers on them. Even the tip has a number etched on it. The actual Cummins number is sort of hidden. It is just below the threads when the injection line attaches and usually hard to see unless you know where it is. On the side of the injector body will be several numbers. One very important one will read like 245bar. That is the pop pressure at which the injector fires. Just for info that is 3553 PSI so that gives you a idea how much pressure is in those injection lines. For safety sake you should always wear face protection and keep the hands away from the fuel line connections when it is operating. A tiny leak could fire fuel through your skin. Blood and diesel don't mix too well.

On your engine ID plate, 4-390 tells me it's an industrial engine and that part normally is associated with Case tractors. The 4b/4bt was a joint venture of Case and Cummins. An actual Cummins dealer may be the only one who can access info about your engine. Might try and contact member CrewCab59. He is a Cummins dealer and may be able to shed some light on your engine. If I had the model number of your skid steer I used to have a source where I could look up parts but that company is no longer associated with Case. In older parts, a Cummins part that begins with the number 3 would begin with the letter J in Case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
OK I am following you on the spray pattern info, how a square is a rectangle but not the other way around, I get that. but my uncertainty is, which do I have, and when I shop for them, spray pattern is not included in details usually
I tried to follow about which piston is lower compression - you said the marine style had lower compression, then gave it a rating of 17.5:1 which was higher than the other, so is it the marine that has lower compression?
I understand that I wouldnt want lower compression, that makes sense to me.
What about the numbers off the inside of my piston? 102018-21; 1275; also a 16, K, 40, B1

Ok so your saying the injectors that I linked might be a good choice? They dont list any of those numbers in the details either, so how do I know? ugh lol. I am thinking about getting mine rebuilt. But I wonder if they will be able to find the original 9mm tips, or they will switch them to 7mm as well?
Numbers on my injector body is 5568 also JH LJC6760501
the Tip has a number 6801079 also has an 'EGG 1' on the tip

I came across my Case manual. might have been help from the beginning! although when I google i still come up with different things. I attached pics of the piston page and the injector page. let me know if these part numbers help us figure anything out.

for example I search the A77412 number for 40 over and get this https://www.tractorpartsasap.com/cylinder-kit-100mm-040-new-case-a77412-166580.html I dont know what brand that is. and it doesnt tell me what size/degree bowl.

Thanks for all your help char1355
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I did just talk to a Case dealer, and they said 9mm tip part number has changed to the 7mm tip number, which would be JR919331 or J919331. and they confirmed the A77412 number. when I search the J919331 number I mostly get ebay listings and other random sites (plenty to choose from) with prices ranging from 100-200 for a set of 4. does that sound right? Am I fine getting some off ebay for $100? lol. they have case pictures on the listing and say they go right in the 1845c! lol
 

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That manual is worth it's weight in gold. OK. Your injector part number is J914472 and rebuilt number is JR914472. The Cummins part # is 3914472 for the 9mm model. Those have been discontinued but Oregon Fuel Injection does rebuild them for $99 each plus a $30 core. So if your cores are good you get that back. Those would still have 9mm tips just like the originals. Nothing wrong with rebuilt injectors. Those are 155 deg spray pattern. The Cummins number is discontinued and no longer available. Nothing wrong with the newer replacements that come with the 7mm to 9mm sleeve. So long as they have the correct nut size on top which is 12mm and the correct pop pressure. The part J919331 which is Cummins 3919331 is no longer available from Cummins. Don't know about Case but there are tons of those in the aftermarket but those are not genuine Bosch units. Not sure that really matters anymore. Those are all coming out of China and are usually under $200 per set of 4. You'd just need to get the little sleeves for them and those aren't very expensive. Those are Cummins part 3919358 and cost around $7 each.

On the pistons, your OEM units would have been 17.3:1. The marine style bowls are 17.5:1 so not enough difference there to matter. True marine pistons are the low compression 15.3:1. You don't have to worry about those. They aren't in the running for you application. The A77412 is the Case part for the .040 over piston kit which is Cummins part 3906208. Those are non turbo pistons just like your originals. See photo below. You can find those for about $60 each. That Allstate listing you found is one I saw. They are cheap and there are some even cheaper. If you want to use turbo grade pistons that is not a problem. They have a better keystone ring at the top. Have to remember a vast majority of these parts are coming out of China and so they are very cheap. Also remember that they are one of the few countries still producing the 4bt engine. They haven't been made in the USA for about 15-20 years.

One area of your rebuild you haven't talked about is what bolts to replace. You will need new rod bolts as Cummins does not recommend reusing those. Not super expensive but all the Cummins part # is 3900919. If you want an upgrade ARP units are part 247-6304. You will also need a new set of head bolts. There you have an option to consider. Original head bolts are not terribly expensive but they have a sort of weird torque procedure. An option would be to use studs instead of the bolts. ARP part for 4bt studs is 247-4206. These are not required, just an option. Main bolts in the bottom end don't need replacing. Another area that gets attention on these engines is the head gasket. Some aftermarket gaskets are perfectly good and some are junk. Hard to gauge that without actually seeing them. Even though you usually buy the gaskets and seals in a kit, lots of guys will spend the extra money for an OEM Cummins head gasket. Do you plan to do the actual rebuild yourself. These engines are not hard to work on. Just have to watch out for a few of those gremlins that might be hiding. LOL. If you have the block hot tanked and cleaned I'd replace all the freeze plugs. There you may stay with Cummins parts as those things are metric and hard to find correct fitting replacements. Be extra careful to make sure you replace the ones in the oil galleries or you wont have any oil pressure. We've seen that happen before. If when you tore it down you must label the cam tappets as to which hole they were in. Otherwise they will have to be reground or replaced. They are cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Wow, thank you so much for all this help! This brings a lot of confidence to the table!
I did actually already buy some injectors before, sort of before I began all of this work, trying to just get ahead of the game. then months later as I did research i wondered if i purchased the right ones or not. I DID buy a set of cheap J919331 off ebay. 7mm that require the 9mm sleeve. are you suggesting that these are probably OK? or should I try to have mine rebuilt?
When you say Allstate listing, you mean this listing? https://www.tractorpartsasap.com/cylinder-kit-100mm-040-new-case-a77412-166580.html You think these pistons are fine/good quality, etc?

I do plan on doing the rebuild my self. I am an automechanic with lots of experience with engines, just not much on diesels. this motor looks simple, yes. I have just been racking my brain over the whole piston/injector/pump area, whats right, whats wrong, whats ok, whats best, etc.
I was not really planning on hot tanking it. its pretty clean as it is. yes head bolts need to be replaced, thank you for sharing that info, I did not know about the studs. I have the manual i planned on following whatever torque sequence they say, whatever ftlbs or degrees they say, ive done some weird ones before, so ill probably just go with oem bolts. if I put studs in, the torque sequence would change...to what? do they give that info with the studs?

do you know much about the rebuild kit that i linked? think that head gasket is OK?

I really appreciate you taking all this time to respond and help me out, thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
I have found this kit for cylinder head bolts

I found these for rod bolts

On the injectors, another question. I said I bought a cheap set matching J919331. I noticed the nozzle tip protrudes every so slightly further down into the cylinder. very slightly. does this have something to with the difference between a 7 and 9mm tip? or is that something that is wrong and I should watch out for?

The head gasket I am getting some options. it says standard, or 2 notches or 3 notches. mine has been rebuilt before, and the gasket has no notches. I couldnt guarantee its the right one. or if no notches means Standard. here are some pics
 

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When I rebuilt mine the seal kit came with 2 or 3 different thickness of sealing washers for the base of the injectors as I understood it they were for finetuning the distance between the injector tip and the piston bowl this is to allow for the variations in castings, machining etc. IIRC one of mine required a different thickness the the rest to have the same standoff.

One other thought if the one that is different does not protrude as far as the others I would first check if there is still a sealing washer in the bottom of the bore.
 

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Sounds like the 7mm injectors you got are OK. As for the tips being slightly long, I think the sleeves make up for that. See photo below. You'll find those little devils priced all over the board. If they come in that pretty Cummins box they go up in the $20-30 range each. Aftermarket versions are around $7 or less. Here's a set of 6 out of China for $15.45. About a month delivery time. 6PCS Injector Adapter Car Modification 3919358 Accessory For 5.9L 89‑93 | eBay The injector tip protrusion into the head is important. It affects the timing.

On the head gaskets, those notches they are probably speaking of are marks put on the cylinder block indicating it has been surfaced by so much. During the rebuild, the important info is how much the piston protrudes above the surface of the block. If it's more than standard then you need a thicker head gasket. In a normal rebuild there would be X's stamped on the top of the block indicating how much it has been cut. I believe each X represents .010". This is one thing you have to measure after assembly to be sure what you have and which gasket to buy. If protrusion is too much to be covered by a thicker gasket then the pistons have to be shaved a little. Don't want the pistons colliding with the head. That gets ugly.

The bolts you found are typical. Like I said they aren't very expensive. Head studs run a bit over $300 and are highly recommended on engines being built for higher power. In your case that isn't an issue. The ARP rod bolts I mentioned are a little over $100 per set of 8. Again those are more for a high performance engine build.

On the pistons, that is the company I spotted. Have to be careful on some of the cheaper ones because they may just be the pistons only without other parts. That one from All States has pistons, rings, clips and pins just like you find in the OEM Cummins kit.

Any other questions feel free to ask. I don't know everything and if I don't I'll say so and recommend someone who knows.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ok that is good info on the head gasket. I did not know that the distance the piston protrudes above the block must be measured - I am used to rebuilding gas engines, usually not an issue! Is it possible that the top of my block does not need to be shaved at all? or is that highly recommended no matter whenever its taken apart? I figured the head should be checked for sure.
Ok so sounds like I need to order a kit and I may be scrapping the gasket that it came with depending on what measurement i get with the pistons - got it!

I am aware of the sleeves, and the copper washer, etc. when i compare the new injectors I got with my old injectors, I measured the distance the tip extends past the flange part (where the washer would sit) I measured both, and the new ones stick down further. the thickness of the sleeve-washer was the same as the old normal washer, so the tip would have protruded further down. you say that distance is important. what should the distance be? I attached a picture. you see the old compared to the new, tough to see but the new is longer. so would my goal be to make the new match the old, with accompanying shims/washers? or is there another specific distance I am aiming for? where do I get these varying washers to adjust the distance?
This is why I am tempted to get my old ones rebuilt, however, I bet they cant get the 9mm tips again and or they will come different length tips anyway and I am in the same boat.

I have actually been looking at this site a lot more now, if anybody has anything to say about it. Pure Diesel was able to help me less and less and answer less and less questions, so I kind of got turned away. I came across this site when looking for pistons. theirs were a few dollars more than the allstate listing, but they have everything else that I need, and their kits are a good price. here is the kit I am looking at
Cummins 4B 3.9L Inframe-Overhaul Engine Rebuild Kit - Naturally Aspirated
Obviously I would select 1.0mm over and standard bearing sizes, etc.

that kit should come with these pistons I believe, which I need to call and confirm
And they list the part numbers that match what my case manual has, so I think I am good there!

I really do appreciate all of this, guys!
 

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On the injectors, I suspect once you slip those sleeves on there and measure the distance all will be fine. The actual distance that is important is to those little tiny holes where the fuel exits. You notice on you old one those holes are almost at the tip and I believe the new ones may be farther down so the difference isn't as dramatic as it looks. 9mm tips are still available from sources in China. You'll notice that rebuilt 9mm are more expensive that new 7mm. The parts to rebuild them can get expensive and US labor is a tad more than China. Especially those tiny little shim used to adjust the pop pressure. Those little devils cost like $7 each and there are 30 different thicknesses. A rebuilder could have thousands of dollars tied up in those alone.

One item you haven't mentioned is the injection pump. Do you plan to have it checked out or is it in good shape. That's one area where cost can get crazy. Rebuilds sort of hinge near the $1000 mark and buying a new pump is very hard on the bank roll.

Yeah, on gas engines the piston don't get quite so close to the head as with a diesel. As to whether to cut the head or the block sort of depends on condition. If they don't need it you don't do it. If you cut the head then you have to watch for valve protrusion. There should be info in your service manual as to clearance that is acceptable. You could always order a rebuild kit with a thicker gasket. That wouldn't affect your compression ratio very little if it wasn't needed. I'll post you some videos you can look at concerning head gaskets. This guy is pretty old school and his videos are very helpful.

On the Case part conversion that sort of has to be looked at one part at a time. Case started using their own suppliers other than Cummins and some parts have new numbers. Any part you see beginning with the letter J you simply change that to the number 3 and you have the Cummins part. One bit of info you do not have on your engine is the CPL number. You'd need to contact someone at a Cummins store and see if they can provide that. I notice that parts supplier you listed asks for that number. There are not all that many parts that are unique on on various CPL numbers. Pistons is one that does vary. Buying all from one store is not a bad idea. AG Kits specializes in parts for farm and industrial applications.

You've worked on engines and the 4B is about as basic as a gas engine with a few differences. The engine has piston cooling nozzles in the upper webbing of the block. I believe the rebuild kit has those even though they don't mention them. Those are important. The kit has new rod bushings. You may need a machine shop to install and size those to your pins unless you have a Sunnen honing machine. Of all the gasket that come in the kits, the one least used is the one for the front gear cover. Most use RTV on that as it doesn't leak as bad. When you get to the point of installing that, the crank area where the front oil seal sits must be absolutely free of oil. Clean it with brake cleaner or some good solvent. Any oil on there will cause a leak. Rear crank seal doesn't have that issue. Just don't install it backward or you'll have a nice oil leak. Some guys have found that out the hard way. Also, be careful in removing the old seal from that aluminum frame. A gouge from a tool can make that part useless.


 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
My injection pump is new actually too, haha! already sunk that money months ago! here is my exact pump, I bought it here
That leads me to my next question, what style pump is that called? is that a VE pump? or is it called a CAV Pump? any brief explanation on the difference?

Yes, I agree that there is the slight uncertainty without the CPL number. I figured if that kit includes those pistons which interchange exactly with the part numbers included in my manual, then I would be good to go. But I will also call a cummins store to try and get a CPL number. would be nice to have. any known places to call? Yea I still havent called them, but that AG site seems to a good one stop shop for the most part.

I will have my machine shop do the piston - rod assembly, valve seals, bore the block, check the head for cracks, and machine head/block IF needed.
 

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The style of your injection pump is rotary. VE is a Bosch model, CAV is a Lucas model and your Delphi is also a CAV. Delphi bought the CAV division of Lucas in 2000 so now it is their model. Your original pump was likely a Lucas brand. There are also VE pumps made by other companies under Bosch license.

I contacted Cummins and the reason there is no info is that is a 3rd party engine. It was licensed by Cummins but they did not build it so it has no CPL number. Only Case could tell you who actually built it. Don't think that is really needed but at least we know some history.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I was actually going to tell you the same info. I got in contact with Cummins customer service who said that case has contract with Cummins around that era and Cummins can’t give any info on it. So I went to case who said their records aren’t good before 2002 lol. But the guy is looking into it more for me tomorrow.

so what does that mean for buying things without cpl numbers, like that rebuild kit? Pistons should be ok as long as they Match that part number from my case manual, the A77412 for1.0mm bored. But will there be other issues?
 

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Hey all, I am new the forum here. truth be told, I am not swapping anything, I am rebuilding the 4B out of my case skid steer, and I am looking for a little clarification, I appreciate the help if anybody is able.

I am on the way with this project. its out and all torn apart. crank needs to be replaced. initial issue was a bad injector that ruined a rod, the bearing, and the crank. measured the block, and it needs bored 40 over on all cylinders. I got a crank ordered. I am about to order things from Pure Diesel Power. However, I am just stuck on this small piston/large piston thing. could anybody give me some info? Seems its not too straight forward, haha. My application is a skid steer, so I am thinking mostly marine style. I have been told it most likely has large bowl pistons. but it seems pictures on the web are so diverse and different. I just want to make sure I get the right piston/injector combo.

I am looking at this kit bored 40 over McBee 3.9L 4BT Cummins Engine Rebuild Kit
I am looking at these injectors 3.9L 4BT 8V Cummins Contagious 5x.011 SAC Injectors
Those injectors also will also need to be used in conjunction with the 7-9mm sleeves as my stock injectors were 9mm and cant seem to find those anywhere. they said this is fine.

These were all recommended by Pure Diesel after answering their questions, I am just following up/confirming because I am so confused about the piston situation. Here is a photo of my current pistons. Are these large bowls or small bowls? ughh!! haha.

Thanks for all the help!!
If you clean the top of your piston(s) there is a 4 digit number etched , which is the last for digits of the Cummins part #. There are several places on line where you can acquire the right piston with that 4 digit number. Interstate-Mcbee catalog is a good place to start. Any good Cummins parts place should be able to do the same
 

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Not having the CPL number is not going to be a big issue. Don't even have to worry about an exact match of piston numbers, but if that info is there that's OK. Just for interest, I found a 4B engine made at the Cummins plant in Rocky Mt, NC. It's serial number is 44888261. Has the CAV injection pump like yours, has 3906208 17.3:1 pistons like yours would need, shows the 7mm injectors and sleeves, and guess what. It doesn't show a CPL number either. Whether it has one I don't know. I may email Cummins to see just for kicks. You could use this one on Quick Serve to cross reference with your Case parts manual. Just for info, the injector they show is part 3802338 or 3802338RX. RX is a rebuilt part. Here's the factory diagram.
Liquid Fluid Art Font Ornament
 
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