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Hey friends, I live in northern Montana so it is cold here 5 months of the year! I do have a engine block heater, but I wont be able to plug it in when I'm hunting or at work for 10 hours. So I think it would be essential. I was wanting to know if anyone has ever used a grid heater on their 4BT? How would I wire in the relays to the computer? or should I use a switch to heat it up then turn it off? Thanks for your two cents!
 

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I put one on mine last year. It works amazingly well. I used a ground to activate solenoid from Surplus center. Heavy gauge wiring from battery to solenoid to grid heater. Light gauge wiring from solenoid to momentary switch in cab. Grounded the switch to the dash. Flip and hold switch for count of 15. Fires up like its summer time. Got the intake plate off ebay. Had to slightly clearance the body of the grid heater for the injector line to clear. Had to modify the injector line support brackets a bit- no big deal. Used a intake horn from a 5.9 off ebay. I am only using one group 31 battery. It works awesome. I am in Northern Wyoming and needed for the same reasons you do.
 

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Unless you have an ISB engine you probably don't have a computer. The wiring of the grid heater is pretty straight forward. Install it on the intake plate (might need a new plate if yours doesn't accommodate one). There may be one or two relays that send the power to the unit. Those are wired directly to the battery (a fusible link is required). To trigger the relay assembly, use a momentary on or push button switch. Engage it for about 10 second or less and then start the engine. Remember those heaters use a lot of current so you don't want them on for a long time. Will quickly drain the battery. The units that had dual relays were designed so the vehicle computer would activate only one half of the grid in less cold weather. You can decide whether you want to tie the two sections together or use two switches on the dual relays. With the 4bt, you become the computer. An alternative to the grid heater is a device called a thermostart. It's a very simple device that uses diesel fuel to heat the intake chamber. Those are cheap and use far less battery power to operate. Those are very common on farm tractors. You have a small diesel tank ( probably less than a pint) that feeds the unit. They make tanks that can be plumbed into the return line so it's always full. When the power is applied, the unit heats up and a valve opens letting diesel drip on a hot coil. The fuel ignites and you have a fire in the intake. Instant heat.
 

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I did have a heck of a time finding long enough metric bolts for my intake horn. So if you ebay one, it would be a bonus if it came with the bolts.

And as someone else mentioned- some protection is good. I added a resettable breaker to my heavy gauge wiring.
 

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I did have a heck of a time finding long enough metric bolts for my intake horn. So if you ebay one, it would be a bonus if it came with the bolts.

And as someone else mentioned- some protection is good. I added a resettable breaker to my heavy gauge wiring.
My local Ace Hardware store carries metric flange head bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Wow thanks everyone! So I picked up an intake horn and grid heater off craigslist for 75 dollars and it comes with the bolts. Now all I need is the intake cover! Really happy with all the answers. Thanks Again!
 
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