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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
You won't pass 250 HP with a single turbo. Install a 3000 RPM governor kit, a #10 torque plate, and adjust the pump timing to around 16 deg. Much higher than that and you chance blowing the head gaskets without other mods. If you're pushing more toward the 250 HP mark you'll need larger injectors. Stock units will run out of fuel a bit before that. If you change injectors you have to be careful with the P3000. Not totally sure, but I believe that unit may use injectors with lower pop pressure like the A or VE injection pumps. They pop at 245 bar where the P7100 is 260 bar. We don't have as much info on those P3000 pumps because they are probably rarer than the P7100.
Thanks again for the reply and helping me identify what pump I have.
I purchased a governor spring and a fuel plate.
I don’t know how to adjust the timing, but hopefully have friends that do.
I will install new Holset but will save the upgrades until I get it running.
Working on a fuel cell now …
 

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Adjusting the timing on the P pump can be done in several ways. The factory recommended procedure uses a gauge attached to the #1 outlet port of the pump. You engage the locking pin on the pump and the engine cam. You remove the nut attaching the pump drive gear and loosen it. This usually requires a gear puller. This can be done without removing the gear housing front cover. There is a plug over that gear nut. There are numerous videos online that show this procedure. The tools to adjust in this method are a couple hundred dollars. After you adjust you reinstall the gear. Caution. That gear is held in place only by friction and is torqued to a very high number. The pump shaft and inside the gear must be absolutely clean and free of any oil. Otherwise the gear can slip and the timing is messed up. The other procedure uses a degree wheel attached to the crank pulley. With that one you must know what the original pump timing number is and since you don't have an ID plate you don't know that number. The first method is probably your best. Another caution, when loosening and retorquing the nut on the pump you want to have the alignment pins free. They are easily broken. Just break the nut loose and then engage the pins. When reinstalling you just snug the nut up and then loosen the pins before applying full torque. This is usually covered in the videos but you don't want to break those pins, especially the one in the injection pump. I'm not sure what setting a P3000 had to begin with and you may not have to adjust it at all. You'd need the tools to check it first. Never know if someone may have already changed the timing. Here is one video you can watch that will show you the procedure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Adjusting the timing on the P pump can be done in several ways. The factory recommended procedure uses a gauge attached to the #1 outlet port of the pump. You engage the locking pin on the pump and the engine cam. You remove the nut attaching the pump drive gear and loosen it. This usually requires a gear puller. This can be done without removing the gear housing front cover. There is a plug over that gear nut. There are numerous videos online that show this procedure. The tools to adjust in this method are a couple hundred dollars. After you adjust you reinstall the gear. Caution. That gear is held in place only by friction and is torqued to a very high number. The pump shaft and inside the gear must be absolutely clean and free of any oil. Otherwise the gear can slip and the timing is messed up. The other procedure uses a degree wheel attached to the crank pulley. With that one you must know what the original pump timing number is and since you don't have an ID plate you don't know that number. The first method is probably your best. Another caution, when loosening and retorquing the nut on the pump you want to have the alignment pins free. They are easily broken. Just break the nut loose and then engage the pins. When reinstalling you just snug the nut up and then loosen the pins before applying full torque. This is usually covered in the videos but you don't want to break those pins, especially the one in the injection pump. I'm not sure what setting a P3000 had to begin with and you may not have to adjust it at all. You'd need the tools to check it first. Never know if someone may have already changed the timing. Here is one video you can watch that will show you the procedure.
I got the new Super 30 clocked and mounted. Just waiting for the oil lines
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You're also going to need the 90 deg compressor outlet elbow if you don't have it. Turbo looks very much at home there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
You're also going to need the 90 deg compressor outlet elbow if you don't have it. Turbo looks very much at home there.
I Assume you’re referring to the oil outlet. I have a flexible drain pipe coming tomorrow but I’m not sure if it will fit. I’m having a hard time finding the 90° elbow for the oil drain. Do you have any recommendations please
 

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The oil drain does not have a 90 degree elbow. That line is straight. The early style drains had about a 45 deg elbow where it went into the block and was connected to the main drain from the turbo by a section of rubber hose. You can't have a 90 in the drain or you'll risk a back up in the flow. The 90 degree I'm speaking of is the compressor outlet. See below. The oil drain should look like part #12 in the second diagram.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
The oil drain does not have a 90 degree elbow. That line is straight. The early style drains had about a 45 deg elbow where it went into the block and was connected to the main drain from the turbo by a section of rubber hose. You can't have a 90 in the drain or you'll risk a back up in the flow. The 90 degree I'm speaking of is the compressor outlet. See below. The oil drain should look like part #12 in the second diagram.
So I have part 12 coming tomorrow but I found one that I believe is flexible a bit closer to the mounting flange.
The elbow you posted will be used for the plumbing for the inter cooler off the turbo?
 

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Correct. That elbow is is air outlet to the intercooler. That particular one is for 3" diameter piping which is the smallest for the Super HX30W turbo. There is a sealing O ring and a clamping ring that completes the set. The O ring is 3883284 and the clamp is 3069053. That elbow will also need a 1/8" NPT plug if you aren't using that hole for some purpose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Correct. That elbow is is air outlet to the intercooler. That particular one is for 3" diameter piping which is the smallest for the Super HX30W turbo. There is a sealing O ring and a clamping ring that completes the set. The O ring is 3883284 and the clamp is 3069053. That elbow will also need a 1/8" NPT plug if you aren't using that hole for some purpose.
Thanks man !!
I’ll be looking for those parts.
I definitely appreciate your help with the part numbers !!
 

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You can find those parts pretty cheap these days as they are coming out of China. The parts from the local Cummins store may be a tad over $100. You can beat that a bit with some shopping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
You can find those parts pretty cheap these days as they are coming out of China. The parts from the local Cummins store may be a tad over $100. You can beat that a bit with some shopping.
I found the parts at my local dealership. Hope to have them the later part of this week. I got lucky and the oil drain pipe I got just clears the manifold bolt directly under it . I’m still waiting waiting on the oil feed line but that has plenty of room.
 

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Sounds like you've got it pretty well in hand. Yeah, Cummins engineered that flexible drain for the HX30W so it should fit just right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Sounds like you've got it pretty well in hand. Yeah, Cummins engineered that flexible drain for the HX30W so it should fit just right.
Thanks again for the help, you saved me a lot of time by giving me those part number and for the help in general!
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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
@char1355 if I could show you my plan for a fuel system and get your opinion on it please.
Plan will be a fuel cell in the rear of the car.
This is a kit made for the 5.9
140 gal per min.
( Disregard the red/yellow circle)
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Don't really have a personal opinion on the electric fuel pump systems. Those are usually aimed at guys running extreme power levels with modified injection pumps. The standard mechanical piston lift pump for the engines is more than adequate for most purposes and a heck of a lot cheaper. Diesel Tuff sells an upgraded mechanical for $199 which I'd guess to be a lot cheaper than the Fass. Those old mechanicals have a good reputation for durability.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Don't really have a personal opinion on the electric fuel pump systems. Those are usually aimed at guys running extreme power levels with modified injection pumps. The standard mechanical piston lift pump for the engines is more than adequate for most purposes and a heck of a lot cheaper. Diesel Tuff sells an upgraded mechanical for $199 which I'd guess to be a lot cheaper than the Fass. Those old mechanicals have a good reputation for durability.
My plan after I get the engine running and possibly on the street is a new governor spring and fuel plate that I already purchased.
Just don’t want to modify it before I get it running.
I was happy to see when I took off the mechanical fuel pump, the cam shaft looks brand new looking with spray grease on it.
I was told the engine was rebuilt.
 

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That is right. You can do mods in stages and see how they affect the performance. For what you plan that fancy electric lift pump is probably overkill. With a single turbo you're not going a lot over 200 HP which a perfectly good number for a street engine. Your car probably isn't that heavy so once you get it running and start tuning it will fell like you have a big block V8. You have a good turbo and you'll definitely need the intercooler in the first stage of tuning. Second step would probably be the governor spring. Doesn't really add a lot of power but improves gear shifting. The #10 plate and timing adjustment will have a considerable effect on power. It will be like the engine just woke up. The P3000 injection pump isn't the fire breathing monster like the P7100 but it should give you an honest 200-225 HP with all the changes. One item you need to keep in consideration is that vacuum/power steering combo. As I mentioned, that one isn't the best choice. If you don't need a vacuum source for any thing, might look for just the normal power steering pump. If you have vacuum power brakes in the plan then you'll need the vacuum. Otherwise I'd look at hydroboost brakes which tend to be much better. Those run off the power steering pump. I can sort of guess why the previous owner chose that early combo. When mounted it will clear the P pump without any mods. The later combos require changing the PS pump reservoir to a different type and use a remote reservoir. Even the PS pump only type that came on the P pump was that style. Below are photos of the power 2 types of power steering pumps. Those stand alone pumps are available new but are not cheap. Around $630. You can find one used occasionally. The expensive part is the mounting and gear which is $360. If you had those parts you can find the pump part at a reasonable price. That pump with the round reservoir came on GM Asto Vans and some of the diesel pickups. Below shows one off an '84 Chevy K3500.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
That is right. You can do mods in stages and see how they affect the performance. For what you plan that fancy electric lift pump is probably overkill. With a single turbo you're not going a lot over 200 HP which a perfectly good number for a street engine. Your car probably isn't that heavy so once you get it running and start tuning it will fell like you have a big block V8. You have a good turbo and you'll definitely need the intercooler in the first stage of tuning. Second step would probably be the governor spring. Doesn't really add a lot of power but improves gear shifting. The #10 plate and timing adjustment will have a considerable effect on power. It will be like the engine just woke up. The P3000 injection pump isn't the fire breathing monster like the P7100 but it should give you an honest 200-225 HP with all the changes. One item you need to keep in consideration is that vacuum/power steering combo. As I mentioned, that one isn't the best choice. If you don't need a vacuum source for any thing, might look for just the normal power steering pump. If you have vacuum power brakes in the plan then you'll need the vacuum. Otherwise I'd look at hydroboost brakes which tend to be much better. Those run off the power steering pump. I can sort of guess why the previous owner chose that early combo. When mounted it will clear the P pump without any mods. The later combos require changing the PS pump reservoir to a different type and use a remote reservoir. Even the PS pump only type that came on the P pump was that style. Below are photos of the power 2 types of power steering pumps. Those stand alone pumps are available new but are not cheap. Around $630. You can find one used occasionally. The expensive part is the mounting and gear which is $360. If you had those parts you can find the pump part at a reasonable price. That pump with the round reservoir came on GM Asto Vans and some of the diesel pickups. Below shows one off an '84 Chevy K3500.
I will take your advice on the power steering pump and replace it here in the near future. Are you at just need to do some research on how to get to the outcome that I would like to have . The elbow clamp and O-ring that you gave me the part numbers for will be arriving today oh, thanks again for the help
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
That is right. You can do mods in stages and see how they affect the performance. For what you plan that fancy electric lift pump is probably overkill. With a single turbo you're not going a lot over 200 HP which a perfectly good number for a street engine. Your car probably isn't that heavy so once you get it running and start tuning it will fell like you have a big block V8. You have a good turbo and you'll definitely need the intercooler in the first stage of tuning. Second step would probably be the governor spring. Doesn't really add a lot of power but improves gear shifting. The #10 plate and timing adjustment will have a considerable effect on power. It will be like the engine just woke up. The P3000 injection pump isn't the fire breathing monster like the P7100 but it should give you an honest 200-225 HP with all the changes. One item you need to keep in consideration is that vacuum/power steering combo. As I mentioned, that one isn't the best choice. If you don't need a vacuum source for any thing, might look for just the normal power steering pump. If you have vacuum power brakes in the plan then you'll need the vacuum. Otherwise I'd look at hydroboost brakes which tend to be much better. Those run off the power steering pump. I can sort of guess why the previous owner chose that early combo. When mounted it will clear the P pump without any mods. The later combos require changing the PS pump reservoir to a different type and use a remote reservoir. Even the PS pump only type that came on the P pump was that style. Below are photos of the power 2 types of power steering pumps. Those stand alone pumps are available new but are not cheap. Around $630. You can find one used occasionally. The expensive part is the mounting and gear which is $360. If you had those parts you can find the pump part at a reasonable price. That pump with the round reservoir came on GM Asto Vans and some of the diesel pickups. Below shows one off an '84 Chevy K3500.
Thanks again, now the Turbo side all has the same diameter plumbing going to the inter cooler.
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