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After I just did this installation wrong I thought I would make a post to tell the other newbies how to do it right. You guys with more experience than me please make corrections or additions.

I took the timing cover off my motor to do a KDP fix. (Please do a search on this if you don't know what it is.) Taking things apart was a snap. When I inspected the timing cover seal I saw it was shot. I cleaned everything (cover, pulleys, and bolt heads)up in a bead blaster. Then I put the timing cover on the arbor press with appropriate sized backup and bore spacers. The old seal came out easily. I put a fresh coat of epoxy primer and paint on everything. The next day I took some paint thinnner and took all the paint out of the seal area so I had shinny metal. So far so good!

I had to order the seal since my local part stores did not stock it. I bought a National 39803 seal. The price was about $25. From reading previous posts I knew that the sealing surface was not to be touched. When I opened my new seal box that was clearly printed on the seal. There was a plastic insert in the seal to prevent it from contact. I carefully removed this plastic insert to press the seal into the timing cover. When I removed my old seal it was just the seal. In the new box there was also an outer metal piece to be used on some insallations. Help me out here guys--Sould this be used on the 4bt?:confused: My old seal was installed past flush in the timing cover. It appeared to be the depth of the other metal ring insert. I used the additional piece and pressed it all together. I also noticed that my seal looked a little cocked. After some more pressing and tapping I decided that my timing cover wasn't perfect and the bore was not as deap on one side as the other so I decided the seal was in correctly. I reinstalled the plastic seal protector. Now I have a little doubt.

I had made the decision to use grey sealant and not the gasket for the cover replacement. I applied the sealant to the timing cover. Here is where I really screwed up-I took the plastic seal protector out of the seal. LET THIS IN! I didn't realize it helped get the seal over the crank shout. It won't go on without it. Mine got a few ridges and bends. Then I touched it to straighten it out. By this time I have sealant smeared everywhere. I got it together but I think it will leak. I would take it all back apart and redo it while the sealant is soft but there are no more seals in town. I am going to give it a try, but I expect an oil puddle. After I was done I didn't like the extra metal ring around the oil seal. It was really close to the crank snout. I should have tried a fealer gauge or piece of paper to see if it was actually in contact, but I just took my puller and pulled it out of the timing cover. I put everything else back on the front of the motor. I still have the front clip off the truck so it would be a lot easeir to do this all again now before it goes together. What are my chances of a leak??

Why can I take things apart better than I can put them together??
 

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It sounds like you were off to a good start then some confusion around the "metal ring" got you distracted. From your discription, I'd say the metal ring was the seal installation tool supplied with all repacement seals. The tool allows you to press or tap the seal to the proper depth while keeping it square in the housing cover. The tool and the seal should be installed from the front of the housing cover.

On the other hand, the "metal ring" may have been the crankshaft wear sleeve if you purchaced a complete seal kit. You discription does not sound like a possible wear sleeve. If it is a wear sleeve, you will have to remove the old sleeve on the nose of your crank. (a few creases with a semi dull cold chisel will expand the sleeve enough to allow removal) A special tool or homemade adapter will be necessary for new crank sleeve installation.

I personally hate oil leaks...if it were mine, I'd get a new seal and start over. $25 and 2 hours labor is cheap insurance and you won't have to cleanup oil blown over your entire undercarriage.;)
 

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1.Don't use any kind of a press ,you can bend the sealing lip and won't know until it leaks.

2. the steel ring is the install tool plus a seal gauge.

There will be some seal seal that come with a dust seal ring .

You need a new seal the plactic sleeve has to stay in the seal ,if not the double lip on the seal gets damage and will leak.

Scott
 

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From the Cummins shop manual section 7-16

1. Illustration of the timing cover shown with the gasket side up while being supported beneath on wood strips:

"Remove the oil seal from the gear cover. Drive the oil seal from the back side of the cover toward the front side of the cover, while supporting the gear cover"

2. Illustration of front of the crankshaft where the pulley bolts on:

"Clean the gear cover seal bore and the crankshaft surface free of all oil and seal residue"
*My comment: Starting ether works really great as the cleaning agent for this but ONLY use either outside or in a well ventilated area.

3. Illustration same as 2 above:

"Inspect the crankshaft for excessive wear. NOTE: If crankshaft has excessive wear, a service wear sleeve is available"

4. Illustration of the seal:

"Apply a bead of Loctite 277 or equivalent to the outside diameter of the seal"

5. Illustration of the seal and installation tool:

"382498 Installation tool. Leave the plastic pilot installation tool in the lubricating oil seal. Position the seal on the service tool Part No. 3824499 with the lubricating oil seal dust lip facing outward"

6. Illustration of the seal assembly with the wood supported cover facing gasket side up:

"Note: Properly support the front cover lubricating oil seal flange to prevent damage to the lubricating oil seal and front cover. Press the lubricating oil seal into the front cover from the back side of the cover toward the front side of the cover. Press the lubricating oil seal until the service tool bottoms against the front cover"

7. Illustration of timing cover:

"Apply a thin bead of Three Bond to the cover side of the front gasket only. NOTE: Do not remove the plastic seal pilot tool from the lubricating oil seal at this time. Use the plastic seal pilot tool to guide the seal on the crankshaft. Install the cover on the engine"

8. Illustration of front cover seal area and cover:

"Tighten the front cover mounting capscrews. Remove the plastic pilot tool from the crankshaft. Torque value: 24Nm [18 ft-lb]
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My comments: It would seem reasonable from others past experiences that the seal can be installed from either the front or rear of the bore in the timing cover as long as it is placed squarely in the bore. If you touch the sealing surface of the seal the oil residue on your skin can be enough to cause it to leak. If you wrinkle the seal by not having the plastic sleeve in place you have created a very good possibility of leaking seal. The seal is designed to transfer a small amount of teflon to the crankshaft on the initial start up.
 

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Oil seal replacement is outlined step by step with illustrations on TST's website, as well as the KDP fix.
 
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