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Discussion Starter #1
I'm pretty new to this engine and learning what I can. I want to install one in a full size Dodge van. I see there are a few different 4BTs out there, which one should I look for? I assume later might be better, or would an early one be as good? Would there be any to stay away from? What is early and late as far as years of manufacture? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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Try to get one with an inline-pump if possible, they're more rare, but can be tuned up for more power, however the standard rotary pump design is fine for most applications.

Also, try to find a 4BT with the correct adapter plate for your intended application(ford, chevy, dodge, etc) auto/manual.
 

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If you're gonna run it as is or only mildly tweaked then buy on condition, if you are gonna bomb the bejesus out of it go for an inline pump preferably the P pump. Inline is probably better for SVO/WVO also. JMHO

Gaza
 

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can you replace the rotary pump with a inline pump or are the mounts diffrent on the engine.
 

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can you replace the rotary pump with a inline pump or are the mounts diffrent on the engine.
yes you can replace it. iirc an inline pump was 1200 last time i found one. figure another 1200 for lines, gears etc....

2400 better be ALOT of power, heck you can get a complete engine for that.
 

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I'm pretty new to this engine and learning what I can. I want to install one in a full size Dodge van. I see there are a few different 4BTs out there, which one should I look for? I assume later might be better, or would an early one be as good? Would there be any to stay away from? What is early and late as far as years of manufacture? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
An engine intended for on road use is my answer. There are plenty out there not intended for vehicle use. The injection pumps and transmission adapters are useless for an on the road vehicle. I think any of the injection pumps are good, some capable of more HP tweaks than others. So if you looking to get on the list of high HP #'s then your looking for a P-pump engine. Otherwise a good running engine with the trans. adapter/transmission in your particular flavor is what your after.
 

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Very good question. I personally would want to see what the engine was in myself. Another way I know of is the two types of injection pumps that are known to have been in vehicles used on the road. VE Rotary Distributor Pump and the Inline P-Pumped units. There are several other injection pumps used on the engines. Some may work, others not. I would not want to gamble, just my .02 though.
 

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I seem to remember something about the CPL tag rating the engine HP at 1800 RPM and a lack of a KSB solenoid valve on the rotary pump version.
 

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What is your point Bob?

Any VE pump engine is a Rotory Distributor Injection Pump. KSB is a cold start option.

I personally would take the VE over an in-line pump just for the ease of turning it up, there is plenty there for my needs. I don't need to get into the pecker race of high HP #'s...
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for all the replies and info, I appreciate it. It looks like the most common 4BT is the rotary pump 105hp unit from the old bread trucks. It sounds like it would do nicely for my needs. I've got a line on one and if it pans out I'll pick it up.
 

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What is your point Bob?

Any VE pump engine is a Rotory Distributor Injection Pump. KSB is a cold start option.

I personally would take the VE over an in-line pump just for the ease of turning it up, there is plenty there for my needs. I don't need to get into the pecker race of high HP #'s...
I think the last question was "How do you tell the difference between on and off road engines?" and that was what I was answering. That is what I get for hitting reply instead of quote.
 

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do both engines have the same bolt pattering for the transmissions high hp is not is not what i'm after geared more toward mpg and some lite trails thinking of donning a swap into a scout.
 

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do both engines have the same bolt pattering for the transmissions high hp is not is not what I'm after
The 4BT and 6BT Cummins engines have the same rear block bolt pattern, but you must have the proper adapter bolted to the block for the bellhousing to bolt to. They are available in various SAE housings, and also Ford small block, Chevy and Dodge patterns.
 

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How do you tell the difference between on and off road engines?
I was looking at pictures of 4BT powered generator sets.... even though they have a turbo, they do NOT have the aneroid AFC cover with the four common screws and the smoke adjust screw in the middle. Otherwise, the FI pumps look VERY similar.

I would hazard a guess that if the FI pump has the aneroid AFC, then you have a "speed" governed unit (on-road) versus a load governed one (off-road)
 

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I was looking at pictures of 4BT powered generator sets.... even though they have a turbo, they do NOT have the aneroid AFC cover with the four common screws and the smoke adjust screw in the middle. Otherwise, the FI pumps look VERY similar.

I would hazard a guess that if the FI pump has the aneroid AFC, then you have a "speed" governed unit (on-road) versus a load governed one (off-road)


that is correct there is no Air Fuel Control (some call it a Compensator) on a generator set. So under low or no boost situations against the engine the pump system would have no way to add fuel to compensate for the additional load on the engine.
 

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that is correct there is no Air Fuel Control (some call it a Compensator) on a generator set. So under low or no boost situations against the engine the pump system would have no way to add fuel to compensate for the additional load on the engine.
Most industrial uses (pumps, earthmoving machinery, generators etc) rarely see high loads at really low rpms so boost compensators aren't usually an issue.
It's mainly the automotive applications that demand high torque at low engine speeds to accelerate vehicles.
 
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