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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
After 6 years of sitting it's time to start this 4bt. So far I changed the valve springs and governor spring/ fuel pin on the VE pump and added an hx30, and stuck it in a 69 bronco.The fuel lines are all AN fittings, and I primed it until fuel came out of the injectors, which seemed a little fast to be honest. For some reason it isn't starting though. Will fuel still get to the injectors while priming if the solenoid is faulty? I don't know if its functional or not. Also, the KSB plug doesn't have any wires to it and I don't see where they would go into the IP either. Not really cold here in the south either. I thought I read somewhere to pour diesel directly into the IP but that sounds off so I haven't done that. Many thanks for tips on how to proceed.
Drew
 

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If the shut off solenoid is working there would be fuel passing through. Just getting fuel to the injectors doesn't mean you are building enough pressure to fire them. It takes roughly 3550 PSI to pop the injector on a VE pump engine. When working properly, if you crack open a nut on an injector that fuel would hit the hood. Be careful, that stuff can be dangerous when under full pressure. Most likely you still have air in the lines. Takes a while to get that stuff out. Some guys put a piece of clear fuel line at the end of the injector return to look for air bubbles. As for the KSB, it doesn't have to be connected for the pump to operate. It is primarily a smog device that advances pump timing to help the engine warm up quicker. There are 2 types of those on VE pumps. One is a solenoid type that operates off a switch mounted in the head. That one was usually a later style. The other type is a wax motor type that draws its power from a jumper wire to the shut off solenoid. Look at your solenoid and see it there might be a blade terminal attached to the power screw. Not unusual for those to be disconnected. Here are a few photos of the 2 types. Photo #1 is the solenoid type and #2 is the wax motor type. If you had the solenoid type, the solenoid itself is replaceable but expensive. Around $200+. Most likely yours is the wax motor type.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I’ll just keep priming away then. Might try to pressurize the fuel tank. There isn’t even a ksb valve on there anymore. I only cracked the banjo bolt going to the injectors. I’ll keep going. Thanks
 

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Depending on your engine CPL, it may not have a KSB. Most road use engines did have one but industrial units often did not. They weren't meeting the same EPA regulations as road engines. Don't think pressurizing the fuel tank will help. An engine that has been silent for 6 years might have other issues. Residual fuel in the system might be gummy. Always good to use some type of additive to keep the system clean. Are you getting any smoke at all from the exhaust? You can use a bit of starting fluid but don't drown it. Try a couple small squirts in the intake and see if it fires. It just takes time and patience to get one running after a long sleep.
 

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In my truck the fuel tank is above the lift pump and I have noticed that bleeding the system consistently takes MUCH less time/drama then what most seem to report, I have always chalked this up to there being a little head pressure to the lift pump. If my tank is completely full I can crack the bleeder port on the head near the filter and after a while fuel will be dripping from it, so a little pressure in the tank couldn't hurt.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I removed the fuel lines and other parts while ago so I think just about everything was dry. I did try a little starting fluid with my 6 year old son turning the key, absolutely priceless moment when it fired up. You would have thought there was a bee hive in the truck. It blew one of the turbo pipes off and shut down. He earned a trip to the playground, I’ll try again later.
 

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Depending on your engine CPL, it may not have a KSB. Most road use engines did have one but industrial units often did not. They weren't meeting the same EPA regulations as road engines. ...
My CPL # 727 4bt does not have a KSB. 1986 engine (in a Ford/Grumman delivered to Continental Baking in Phoenix, AZ. I "suspect" that the KSB appeared after 1986, but, can not prove it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It’s a 93 engine. Has a plug in the intake plate, but that’s it. I live in Charlotte NC so it doesn’t really get that cold. Firing up with ether was good news for me, I took someone’s word/video that this engine ran when I purchased it off eBay about 6 years ago.
 

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My '88 CPL 767 does not have one either and with a single battery starting it started right up last week at 07:00 with it 18* after holding the grid heater button down for 10 seconds.
 

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I have a block heater as well but since adding the grid heater I only worry about it when I know it's gonna be REAL cold seeing as we have a lot of property and the trucks place in the shop has been taken over by the Wife's new car..........:(
 

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Discussion Starter #12
My wife is trying that same move for her beamer. She said I could have all three bays for my glassblowing shop and tools. We’ll see how long this chess game goes, even if I have to let her win, I still win.
 

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Smart man.................the key to happiness is knowing when to say WITH FEELING "yes dear your RIGHT"
 

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The fact that it fired up with the starting fluid is a good sign. Just got to work that air out of it. Weather like we have right now in NC should be no problem for starting a Cummins. It can get down to 20 deg temp and fire right up. If you have a block heater it won't hurt to hook it up. Warm engine spins over much easier. Just make sure you have very heavy battery cables. Factory cables on most vehicles were far too light for a diesel. 2/0 positive and ground are a good recommendation. Aha, got yourself a good second mechanic there. Good to hear. Before you know it he'll want to borrow it for a date. LOL.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I’ll make my son build his own, no way I’m trusting him with this one. Definitely has air in the lines. Cracked one of the injectors and it let out a dusty puff. I did pressurize the tank, a lot easier than manually pumping. I have 2/0 cables, but the battery, starter, and fingers need a rest.
 

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LOL. That sounds like a typical dad. He's got a few more years to go before he reaches that stage. Although not necessarily required, dual batteries can be a plus on these things. Yeah, don't burn up the starter. Just have to do it in stages and rest in between.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
It’s alive!!
I’ll definitely have to get a bigger battery, this one barely works. Also have to tune this pump I guess. Can’t get it to idle any slower and the screw is all the way out. What are you all using for crank amps on a single battery?
 

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